VIDEO: Take a Peek into the Future of Unmanned Ships

first_imgRolls-Royce has unveiled its vision of the land-based control centres that the company believes will remotely monitor and control the unmanned ships of the future.In a six minute film, Rolls-Royce presents a vision of the future in which a small crew of 7 to 14 people monitor and control the operation of a fleet of vessels across the world. The crew uses interactive smart screens, voice recognition systems, holograms and surveillance drones to monitor what is happening both on board and around the ship. “We’re living in an ever-changing world where unmanned and remote-controlled transportation systems will become a common feature of human life. They offer unprecedented flexibility and operational efficiency. Our research aims to understand the human factors involved in monitoring and operating ships remotely. It identifies ways crews ashore can use tools to get a realistic feel for what is happening at sea,” Iiro Lindborg, General Manager, Remote & Autonomous Operations, Ship Intelligence, Rolls-Royce, said. “The autonomous ship does not mean removing human beings entirely from the picture, as is sometimes stated. Unmanned ships need to be monitored and controlled and this will require entirely new kinds of work roles, tasks, tools and environments. The future shore control centre concept has been designed by emphasising the user experience of the human operators. By focusing on the operators’ point of view, it is possible to introduce meaningful, pleasurable and engaging new roles for the ships’ shore control centre professionals,”Eija Kaasinen, Principal Scientist at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd said.The film marks the final stage of research that will inform the design and construction of a project demonstrator before the end of this decade. An effective remote operations centre is essential to the company’s plans to develop autonomous and remote controlled vessels.The research was undertaken by VTT and University of Tampere research centre TAUCHI (Tampere Unit for Computer Human Interaction) in collaboration with Rolls-Royce. It explored the lessons learned from other industries where remote operation is commonplace, such as aviation, energy, defence, and space exploration.On 5 April in Helsinki Rolls-Royce will reveal separate research findings, which it believes will set the direction for the development of remote and autonomous shipping.last_img read more

Three Rs on the decline as a quarter of adults have a

first_imgThe traditional ‘three Rs’ are on the decline in England, analysis has revealed, with over a quarter of adults having literacy levels so low that they may struggle to read a bus timetable or a wage slip.Five million adults lack basic reading, writing and numeracy skills required in everyday life and to carry out a job, research by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation found.According to government figures, 28 per cent of adults have a standard of literacy of level 1 or below, the equivalent of GCSE grades D-G. For numeracy, 29 per cent of adults scored the level 1 or below. Some people have never reached a good level of literacy and numeracyCredit:Alamy Child writing Stephen Evans, Deputy Chief Executive at Learning & Work Institute, said: “Everyone needs a set of basics for life and work in modern Britain. It’s shocking that so many people lack these core capabilities.”This holds back people’s life chances, businesses future success, and national prosperity.” These shocking figures show millions of adults are being left behind in the modern economyKatie Schmuecker, JRF Which countries have the best literacy and numeracy rates? https://t.co/ukFBWZtY7i #education #edchat pic.twitter.com/eWihchyAHB— World Economic Forum (@wef) August 28, 2016 Around one in 20 adults have the literacy or numeracy levels of a five-year-old, meaning they would struggle just to write a short message or to select a floor number in a lift.England is the only country in the OECD where the average literacy score for the youngest age group (16-18 years old) is lower than that of the oldest age group (55 to 65 years old), the  Foundation said.23 per cent of 16 to 18 year-olds are at literacy level one or below, compared to 19 per cent of 55 to 65 year-olds. For numeracy, 29 per cent of 16 to 18 year-olds are at level 1 or below, compared to 26 per cent of the older age group. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. In other countries, young people significantly outperform their older counterparts, but the trend is the opposite in England. For the oldest age group in the study, England is third in the international rankings for literacy, while for the youngest age group (16-18) it is 18th.Katie Schmuecker, Head of Policy at JRF, said: “In a prosperous country like Britain, everyone should have the basic skills they need to participate in society and build a career.“But these shocking figures show millions of adults are being left behind in the modern economy, holding back their potential and the productivity of our businesses suffering as a result.”last_img read more