Exhumation begins at Rathkeale as gardai investigate murder probe

first_imgWhatsApp Twitter Proceedures and appointments cancelled again at UHL Advertisement Previous articleVisitor numbers soar at eagles’ viewing pointNext articleNew support group for Limerick women experiencing separation Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Walk in Covid testing available in Limerick from Saturday 10th April NewsBreaking newsExhumation begins at Rathkeale as gardai investigate murder probeBy Staff Reporter – September 16, 2014 542 Linkedin Facebook Shannondoc operating but only by appointment center_img Surgeries and clinic cancellations extended RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Email Print No vaccines in Limerick yet TAGSfeatured Andrew Carey in [email protected] up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up THE exhumation of a woman found dead in her home over 20 years ago has begun at St Mary’s Burial ground in Rathkeale this Tuesday morning. Limerick woman Margot Seery was found dead in her apartment following a night out and at her inquest, it was found that she died of asphyxiation after choking. However, in a new development to the case, gardai and detectives attached to the cold case unit in Terenure were given new information into the possible circumstances surrounding the woman’s death. Following the granting of an application to the Minister for Justice earlier this summer seeking permission to exhume the body, more than a dozen gardai from the technical crime scene investigation unit and the cold case unit arrived shortly after 7am this Tuesday to begin the work of exhuming the remains of Ms Seery. A garda cordon was put in place at what has been deemed a crime scene as gravediggers started their work. The family plot at St Mary’s Burial ground also has the remains of Ms Seery’s parents as well as her late aunt. A second post mortem is expected to be carried out later at University Hospital Limerick as gardai further investigate this murder probe which is being led by Det Insp George McGeary West Limerick coroner Brendan Nix arrived on scene and said that he had “nothing but the height of praise for what is being done in these difficult circumstances”. More to follow. First Irish death from Coronavirus last_img read more

Wood recognized with Planck-Humboldt Medal

first_imgIn the inaugural award ceremony held Wednesday in Berlin, Robert Wood, together with the American mathematician Sam Payne, received the Max Planck-Humboldt Medal, and British astrophysicist Catherine Heymans received the Max Planck-Humboldt Research Award.The prestigious prizes, which are funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMFT), recognize extraordinary scientists with outstanding future potential.As an electrical engineer and roboticist, Wood has made numerous critical contributions to the field of robotics, and specifically to the subfield of soft robotics that focuses on the design of robots using highly compliant materials. Inspired by the ways in which living organisms move and adapt to their surroundings, soft robots have the potential to be used in many real-world applications for which rigid robots are not suitable.Wood and his team at Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have worked out some of the basic engineering principles for the construction of soft robots at different scales and with different functionalities. These are key to creating soft robots with a much broader range of abilities in the future, including devices that can grasp and manipulate items with dexterity resembling that of the human hand, or that carry out a variety of tasks at different scales or in challenging natural and unstructured environments.Wood is a founding core faculty member of the Wyss Institute and a leader of its Bioinspired Soft Robotics Initiative. He is also the Charles River Professor of Engineering and Applied Sciences at SEAS and a National Geographic Explorer.With a highly multidisciplinary team, he has already developed soft robots that, for example, function as artificial muscles, able to grip and lift objects many times their own weight; small soft endoscopic devices for potential use in surgeries and industrial micromanipulation; and soft gripping devices for deep oceanic research that can be operated remotely to collect fragile specimens. His team increasingly integrates soft robots with new sensor technologies to make them responsive to different control or environmental stimuli, and actuator technologies that rival the remarkable abilities of muscle. To complement these efforts, Wood’s group has developed new fabrication approaches to monolithically integrate new functionalities into soft material architectures, often at scales well below other demonstrations of soft robots.For the 2018 awards, Wood and his two fellow recipients were selected for their unusual ability and future potential to carry out innovative and high-risk research, and to develop new research areas in the natural and engineering sciences. As an additional criterion, the committees also considered researchers’ interest in a research residency or close collaborations with established research groups in Germany. Future awards will also go to researchers from the human sciences and life sciences.“I am deeply honored to have been awarded the Max Planck-Humboldt Medal and I hope this will help to establish close collaborations with German robotics groups who have complementary research interests in the field of soft robotics,” said Wood.“For example, we hope to work with the group of Professor Oliver Brock at the Technical University of Berlin, a leader in soft robotics and specifically in robotic manipulation using soft hands. Forming a collaboration could help us formalize device and algorithm designs that may enable soft robots with human-level dexterity across a range of objects.”The prizes were jointly presented by the president of the Max Planck Society, Martin Stratmann; the president of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, Hans-Christian Pape; and the BMFT state secretary, Michael Meister.last_img read more

Brisbane home features three levels with the creative inclusion of sub-levels

first_img121 Martha St, Camp HillThis architecturally designed home at 121 Martha St, Camp Hill is a family sanctuary.The four-bedroom, two-bathroom property, on an elevated block, has plenty of style and space.Ray White Stones Corner selling agent Ben Cannon said the house was a testament to good workmanship.“It has shown that through quality construction, a home can last and continue to deliver over time,” Mr Cannon said.FREE: Get the latest real estate news direct to your inbox here. 121 Martha St, Camp HillThe backyard is perfect for children as it is low maintenance and child-friendly, and there is an integrated spa.The bedrooms are of a decent size and all have built-in wardrobes. The master ensuite has a walk-in robe with private access to the deck. The spacious interior at 121 Martha St, Camp HillThe new owners can enjoy the home’s polished timber floors, plenty of storage and airconditioning throughout.Mr Cannon said the contemporary residence was set over three levels with the creative inclusion of sub-levels.“By design you and your family will spread out and appreciate an enviable lifestyle whether entertaining or enjoying quiet family time,” he said. 121 Martha St, Camp HillHe said the home was ready to be enjoyed and would appeal to families.Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 2:08Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -2:08 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenDream Home: Buderim02:08 Related videos 02:08Dream Home: Buderim00:32Mediterranean style mansion with wine cave02:10Dream Home: Manly01:31Lana’s Dream Home: favourite rooms01:19Dream Home: Buderim Qld01:36Dream Home: BrookfieldMore from newsCrowd expected as mega estate goes under the hammer7 Aug 2020Hard work, resourcefulness and $17k bring old Ipswich home back to life20 Apr 2020The house features a contemporary open-plan design, zoned living/dining areas and a projector and movie screen for those times you can’t wait to come home to kick back and relax. 121 Martha St, Camp HillWith a covered alfresco area at the back, there’s plenty of opportunity to entertain friends and family all year round.The double garage has a home office/gym and there is plenty of off-street parking.The property is close to shops, schools and is just a quick drive to the airport.last_img read more

Kirk Cousins troubled by Vikings No. 1 pick Garrett Bradbury’s sweaty butt

first_imgYou get the picture: For Cousins to take a snap under center, he has to place his hands against Bradbury’s sweaty butt.”That’s probably one thing we didn’t get a measurement on in the pre-draft process,” Cousins said with a smile. “But It’s not really just the posterior. It’s really just the whole thing. I look at his shins and its just pouring, like my window after a rainstorm.”And apparently the veteran QB has brought it up to Bradbury.So what did the rookie say?”I don’t know, I apologized?” Bradbury said half-quizzically at Wednesday’s line of questioning.”I’m just going to try to keep doing my job coming out here to work,” he continued. “If we need to take alternate methods to prevent, I mean cease the sweating, I don’t know, but it’ll be fine.”That apparently is also what Bradbury has told Cousins, particularly in the context of being able to grip a moist football. Packers’ Jimmy Graham says he’s going to ‘shut a lot of people up’ this season “He promises that it’s not a problem in games, and it remains to be seen because his shorts today were soaked,” Cousins told the media Wednesday. “But apparently when they keep those domes air-conditioned and you get a break on the bench and you sit with the cooling fans, I’m hoping that really helps.”A first big test comes when the Vikings open their preseason against the Saints in the Superdome.”So that’s a big thing I’m going to take away from Friday night, is how tough was it to grip the ball after he snaps it to me. Uh, if it’s tough we might be in pistol and shotgun (formations) all year,” Cousins joked … probably. Kirk Cousins has a new metric for the Vikings’ draft evaluation process. Beyond height, weight, strength and speed, even hand size and arm length, he might suggest the scouts look at sweat — as in “How much does that guy …?”center_img The topic came up (again) Wednesday at the Vikings camp when Cousins was asked about how he was doing with a new center, first-round draft pick Garrett Bradbury.”I’m going to go back again and talk about how much he sweats,” Cousins told reporters ( via the Star Tribune ). Related News Nick Bosa injury update: 49ers rookie has ankle sprain, will sit preseasonlast_img read more