Leading journalist’s car sabotaged four days after gruesome ‘narco-message’

first_img Reports May 10, 2007 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Leading journalist’s car sabotaged four days after gruesome ‘narco-message’ News MexicoAmericas Follow the news on Mexico Organisation April 28, 2021 Find out more Help by sharing this information 2011-2020: A study of journalist murders in Latin America confirms the importance of strengthening protection policies Receive email alerts MexicoAmericas center_img RSF_en Reporters Without Borders voiced concern today about gruesome threatening messages aimed at journalists and the fact that one of the latest messages, which are being blamed on drug traffickers, was followed four days later by an apparent attempt to kill a leading investigative journalist by sabotaging her car.On 3 May, World Press Freedom Day, the head of a corpse was left on a street in the eastern city of Veracruz along with the message: “Here is a gift for journalists, and other heads will fall, as Milo Vela well knows.” Vela is a columnist who writes for the Veracruz-based daily Notiver. Someone appears to have acted on the threats when freelance journalist and human rights activist Lydia Cacho Ribeiro’s car was sabotaged in Mexico City on 7 May.“These so-called ‘narco-messages’ to the press are extremely disturbing,” Reporters Without Borders said. “We call on the authorities to immediately ensure that both Lydia Cacho and Milo Vela are properly protected.”Cacho’s car was sabotaged although she was being escorted by three policemen because of the death threats she regularly receives. As she and her police bodyguards drove away from Mexico City’s airport after her arrival there on 7 May, the driver lost control and nearly crashed. Her bodyguards discovered that the nuts had been loosened on one of the wheels.“If the driver had not braked in time, the wheel would have come off and the car would have turned over,” Cacho said. “At first time I did not think it was very important, but then the policemen showed me the nuts… I have been advised to file a complaint at once because everything indicates it was a murder attempt.”Mexico continues to be the western hemisphere’s deadliest country for the press, with two journalists murdered since the start of the year and one missing. Reporter murdered in northwestern Mexico’s Sonora state May 13, 2021 Find out more to go further News May 5, 2021 Find out more NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say Newslast_img read more

LYS to hold 40th anniversary celebration

first_imgLinkedin Limerick Youth Service have launched a new online live information chat service Print Keith Allen, Dylan Graham and Ryan O’Donoghue, who were part ofLimerick Youth Service’s 40th birthday celebrations.Keith Allen, Dylan Graham and Ryan O’Donoghue, who were part ofLimerick Youth Service’s 40th birthday celebrations.LIMERICK Youth Service is inviting past and present volunteers, participants and staff to a celebration evening at the Strand Hotel on Friday, September 26 at 7.30pm.The event marks the formal end to the popular youth organisation’s 40th anniversary celebrations. “Having supported Limerick’s youth for over four decades, we are sure there are some out there with amazing stories that we would like to hear,” said Catherine Kelly, CEO, Limerick Youth Service.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up “We would like to gather as much information as possible about people’s time with Limerick Youth Service and share it with the wider public. The evening is also our way of saying thank you for the support Limerick Youth Service has and continues to receive from the people of Limerick and beyond,’ added Ms Kelly.The evening will also feature the regional leg of Youth Work Ireland’s Volunteer Achievement Awards with local volunteers nominated in a number of categories.“The categories reflect the diversity of volunteering opportunities at Limerick Youth Service. From a Friday night youth club, to various committees or leading a band of merry men up Croagh Patrick, volunteers contribute their time and experience to our young people,” said Dermot Troy, Limerick Youth Service.Volunteers from this year’s local awards will be put forward for selection for Youth Work Ireland’s National Volunteer Achievement Awards to be held in Dublin in October.Anyone interested in attending the event can contact Dermot Troy at [email protected] Limerick Youth Service bakers create a special ‘Soviet Loaf’ Twitter Facebook TAGSLimerick Youth Service Limerick Youth Service Calling for Additional Investment in Youth Work Sector Advertisementcenter_img RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR NewsCommunityLYS to hold 40th anniversary celebrationBy John Keogh – September 12, 2014 848 Previous articleAutistic students put at riskNext articleMid West needs more start-ups John Keoghhttp://www.limerickpost.ie WhatsApp Young people graduate from Youth Employability Programme with Limerick Youth Service Email Nordic adventure for Northside teens Teenagers get on their bikes in search of new opportunitieslast_img read more

Is Indiana the New Iowa?

first_imgWhen Dow and DuPont decided to merge into a single behemoth corporate entity, they announced they would spin off their two agricultural divisions into one all ag company. Basically, this would mean putting DuPont Pioneer together with Dow AgroSciences to form a global, $18 billion heavyweight to compete with the likes of Monsanto, Syngenta, BASF, and Bayer.  The conventional thinking was that this new major ag firm would be located in Iowa, since Pioneer already had its headquarters there.  But, that is not how things turned out.While Iowa officials launched a high profile campaign to land the headquarters of the yet to be named entity, Indiana put together a low key, full court press to challenge Iowa. According to those close to the negotiations, when Dow/DuPont top execs came to Indiana they had their minds pretty much made up that things were going to Iowa. Yet, as one of the members of the Hoosier team said, “We knocked their socks off.”  A combination of a pro-business and pro-agriculture atmosphere impressed the top brass.  In the end, it was decided to have two Global Business Centers, one in Iowa and the other in Indiana.For the past decade, Indiana has been cultivating a climate that is supportive of agriculture. Not only is it supportive of agriculture within the state, but also supportive of attracting agricultural investment from outside the state.  The first round came with the renewable fuels boom. Late to the game and, well behind Iowa, Indiana made up ground quickly by attracting billions of dollars to build new ethanol and biodiesel plants in the state. In recent years, the focus has shifted to attracting food processing plants. When Governor Pence ran for his first term, the foundation of his agricultural policy was innovation in agriculture. He had the vision to make Indiana a center of research and innovation for agriculture and food production.  It is this policy that enabled the Hoosier State to put together the kind of package that was able to compete with Iowa and land this major global agricultural business.Indiana is gaining a reputation as a major ag player in other areas. As a specialist in swine genetics, Whiteshire Hamroc, based in Fort Wayne, was recently featured in Bloomberg Business news. The article focused on the growth of the animal genetics industry, especially in developing countries where demand for meat is growing.  Indiana-based Beck’s Hybrids has been making news as it expands into the Western Corn Belt; and Jiff Simmons, President of Elanco, is recognized as an international authority of innovation and food sustainability.Where Indiana is still lacking is getting the majority of Hoosiers to understand that they live in a key agricultural state.  Most of Indiana’s residents identify with motorsports, basketball, and manufacturing. Many residents of even our smaller communities see farming as a source of possible pollution rather than a source of jobs and local economic activity. More work needs to be done to get more of the 6.2 million Hoosiers on the Ag bandwagon.Indiana is celebrating its Bicentennial this year. During this celebration, there will be a lot of talk about how agriculture is part of the Hoosier heritage and of the role it played in the formation of the state and its culture. But, what also needs to be showcased is how agriculture is part of the Indiana future.  Biotechnology, life sciences, food production, and renewable energy will all see significant growth and innovation in the next 100 years.  If these become the centerpiece of the Hoosier economy and culture, look out Iowa!FOOTNOTE: Our next “IS IT TRUE” will be posted on this coming Friday?If you would like to advertise in the CCO please contact us City-County [email protected] “Readers Poll” question is: Do you feel that Council was correct in voting to spend $17 million dollars to renovate North Main area?Copyright 2015 City County Observer. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributedFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare,When Dow and DuPont decided to merge into a single behemoth corporate entity, they announced they would spin off their two agricultural divisions into one all ag company. Basically, this would mean putting DuPont Pioneer together with Dow AgroSciences to form a global, $18 billion heavyweight to compete with the likes of Monsanto, Syngenta, BASF, and Bayer.  The conventional thinking was that this new major ag firm would be located in Iowa, since Pioneer already had its headquarters there.  But, that is not how things turned out.While Iowa officials launched a high profile campaign to land the headquarters of the yet to be named entity, Indiana put together a low key, full court press to challenge Iowa. According to those close to the negotiations, when Dow/DuPont top execs came to Indiana they had their minds pretty much made up that things were going to Iowa. Yet, as one of the members of the Hoosier team said, “We knocked their socks off.”  A combination of a pro-business and pro-agriculture atmosphere impressed the top brass.  In the end, it was decided to have two Global Business Centers, one in Iowa and the other in Indiana.For the past decade, Indiana has been cultivating a climate that is supportive of agriculture. Not only is it supportive of agriculture within the state, but also supportive of attracting agricultural investment from outside the state.  The first round came with the renewable fuels boom. Late to the game and, well behind Iowa, Indiana made up ground quickly by attracting billions of dollars to build new ethanol and biodiesel plants in the state. In recent years, the focus has shifted to attracting food processing plants. When Governor Pence ran for his first term, the foundation of his agricultural policy was innovation in agriculture. He had the vision to make Indiana a center of research and innovation for agriculture and food production.  It is this policy that enabled the Hoosier State to put together the kind of package that was able to compete with Iowa and land this major global agricultural business.Indiana is gaining a reputation as a major ag player in other areas. As a specialist in swine genetics, Whiteshire Hamroc, based in Fort Wayne, was recently featured in Bloomberg Business news. The article focused on the growth of the animal genetics industry, especially in developing countries where demand for meat is growing.  Indiana-based Beck’s Hybrids has been making news as it expands into the Western Corn Belt; and Jiff Simmons, President of Elanco, is recognized as an international authority of innovation and food sustainability.Where Indiana is still lacking is getting the majority of Hoosiers to understand that they live in a key agricultural state.  Most of Indiana’s residents identify with motorsports, basketball, and manufacturing. Many residents of even our smaller communities see farming as a source of possible pollution rather than a source of jobs and local economic activity. More work needs to be done to get more of the 6.2 million Hoosiers on the Ag bandwagon.Indiana is celebrating its Bicentennial this year. During this celebration, there will be a lot of talk about how agriculture is part of the Hoosier heritage and of the role it played in the formation of the state and its culture. But, what also needs to be showcased is how agriculture is part of the Indiana future.  Biotechnology, life sciences, food production, and renewable energy will all see significant growth and innovation in the next 100 years.  If these become the centerpiece of the Hoosier economy and culture, look out Iowa!FOOTNOTE: Our next “IS IT TRUE” will be posted on this coming Friday?If you would like to advertise in the CCO please contact us City-County [email protected] “Readers Poll” question is: Do you feel that Council was correct in voting to spend $17 million dollars to renovate North Main area?Copyright 2015 City County Observer. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed Ask most Americans to name an agricultural state and they will say Iowa. This is due, in part, to Iowa’s impressive agricultural production in corn, soybeans, livestock, dairy, and poultry, but it is also due to the fact that Iowan’s are, for the most part, proud of agriculture.  It is part of their culture, their politics, their heritage, and their modern day identity. Agricultural issues are written about in their newspapers, broadcast on their local TV stations, and consume a good deal of their radio broadcast time.   While other states can claim all of these as well, Iowa is generally acknowledged as the leader. Yet, Iowa may have some competition. Is Indiana the New Iowa?  BY GARY TRUITT of HOOSIER AG DAILYlast_img read more

Governor Wolf Addresses Joint Session of PA House and Senate, Urges Action to Combat Opioid Abuse Epidemic (Round-Up)

first_imgABC 27: Governor Wolf pushes for immediate action on opioid and heroin crisis (VIDEO) By: Eryn Spangler, Press Assistant September 29, 2016 TribLive: Wolf urges Pa. lawmakers to tackle abuse of opioid drugs“Every day, we lose 10 Pennsylvanians to the disease of addiction,” Wolf said. “This is a public health crisis the likes of which we have not before seen.” Overdose deaths statewide topped 3,500 last year, or 1,000 more than in 2014, he said.Reading Eagle: Pa. Gov. Tom Wolf urges action on combating state’s opioid crisis“It threatens entire communities throughout the commonwealth,” [Governor Wolf] told lawmakers. “Here in this building we can make a difference, right now, with bills that are close to passage.” Wolf, a Democrat, said partisanship should be overcome. The overdose death crisis has the potential to overwhelm positive steps taken by the Legislature in the past, he said. Beyond that, he said, families across the state affected by the crisis are calling for action.The Times: Wolf, legislators coming together to fight opioid epidemic“Addiction too often is an invisible problem,” Wolf told lawmakers. “But, in Pennsylvania the problem is visible: In the lives lost. The families broken. The communities shaken.” Lawmakers have made the battle against opioid addiction a priority, Wolf said. “And because you have brought the voices of your constituents here, it is now possible for us to fight with every tool we have,” he said. “And that is what we are going to do. We are going to take a stand against the vicious disease of opioid addiction.”Associated Press: Wolf urges quick action on opioid addiction“The opioid epidemic did not start overnight, and we will not fix it overnight or even in this session,” [Governor Wolf] told lawmakers. “But by acting on these bills, and by putting other ideas on the table, we can continue to stem the tide of opioid abuse. We can make progress for the families we have met, the parents who have cried on our shoulders.”PhillyVoice: Gov. Wolf pushes state lawmakers for bills to combat opioid addiction“It is up to us to tackle the opioid crisis and give Pennsylvania the prosperous, healthy and safe future we know it deserves,” Wolf said. “I look forward to a productive session and real progress toward stopping the opioid epidemic. Let us, here in Pennsylvania, lead the nation in fighting this crisis.”PennLive: Gov. Wolf: Pa. must ‘take a stand against’ opioidsPennsylvania politicians of all stripes are expressing great commitment and urgency in the fight against opioid addiction, which is killing ten Pennsylvanians per day and is expected to get worse before it gets better. Now the big questions involve exactly what they’ll do and how long it will take. Gov. Tom Wolf outlined his top priorities on Wednesday during a rare joint address to both the House and the Senate.PLS Reporter: Gov. Wolf addresses joint session of the General Assembly on opioid crisis, but more work remainsGov. Tom Wolf addressed a joint session of the General Assembly Wednesday morning in an effort to spur on legislative action to fight the opioid crisis facing Pennsylvania. According to the governor, while the legislature and administration have already taken steps to help doctors, law enforcement, and the corrections system deal with the opioid epidemic, more work remains to be done.WFMZ: Gov. Tom Wolf urges lawmakers’ fast action on opioid addiction bills (VIDEO) SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Public Health,  Round-Up,  Substance Use Disorder,  The Blog Yesterday, Governor Wolf addressed a joint session of the General Assembly to urge action to combat the current opioid and heroin abuse epidemic plaguing Pennsylvania.“We have shown that we can work together to make Pennsylvania the great place we know it can be. It is now time to do so again and give the people of Pennsylvania a reason to believe in their leaders,” said Governor Wolf. “It is up to us to tackle the opioid crisis and give Pennsylvania the prosperous, healthy, and safe future we know it deserves. I look forward to a productive session and real progress toward stopping the opioid epidemic. Let us, here in Pennsylvania, lead the nation in fighting this crisis.”3,500 Pennsylvanians were lost to overdoses in 2015 and ten Pennsylvanians die per day as part of the opioid abuse epidemic. In order to stem the tide of opioid abuse and help those suffering from substance use disorder, Governor Wolf encourages the legislature to work quickly and efficiently to pass bills aimed at fighting this health crisis.Take a look at the additional coverage below:   SHARE  TWEET Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf Governor Wolf Addresses Joint Session of PA House and Senate, Urges Action to Combat Opioid Abuse Epidemic (Round-Up)last_img read more

Ice cream fundraiser benefits local charities

first_imgGreensburg, In. — The First Presbyterian Church in Greensburg will hold an ice cream fundraiser for local charities Friday, May 25 from noon to 5 p.m. The church is located at 202 N Franklin Street. For more information please call 812-663-2197.last_img