Chinese in Canada a target of increased hate during pandemic

first_imgEllen, who asked to be identified by first name only, said the database will guide advocacy to combat racism.”Very lewd, inappropriate and derogatory remarks and gestures, I’ve experienced quite a bit of that, mostly referencing characteristics of being Asian,” she said.”The anticipation of what might happen to me is quite stressful, scary and disturbing.” Vancouver resident Trixie Ling recalls her disgust and anger after a passing stranger taunted her with racial and sexual slurs in early May. Then he spat on her face.”I was feeling a mixture of shock, disgust and sadness that it happened to me,” Ling said in an interview with AFP near the scene. “But I knew I’m not the only one this has happened to.” Hate-mongeringA stone lion statue on the historic gate of Vancouver’s 125-year-old Chinatown was vandalized last week with “China” and “Covid” graffiti.A nearby Chinese cultural center’s windows were also recently vandalized. A mobile police surveillance camera trailer now monitors the area.Canadian singer Bryan Adams, who recorded his biggest hits in Vancouver, inflamed tensions with a tweet blaming COVID-19 on “bat eating, wet animal market selling, virus making greedy bastards.”Wet markets sell fresh food and produce, including farmed animals and wildlife. One such market in Wuhan, China has been identified by the World Health Organization as a possible source or “amplifying setting” of the outbreak.The “Cuts Like a Knife” singer later apologized for the “racist” post.Vancouver church pastor Daniel Louie, who co-organized an online anti-racism town hall in mid-May, said criticism of China’s government must be distinguished from stereotypes about Chinese people.The hate-mongering has also spilled out against people who were mistaken for Chinese or through association, including of Japanese, Korean or Vietnamese descent. ‘Shockingly high’ The ResearchCo poll also found that 24 percent of South Asians reported racist insults. Even Indigenous people reported being targeted.”It’s so shockingly high, I had to go back to the calculations to make sure there was nothing wrong with the numbers,” said pollster Mario Canseco. The survey is considered accurate within 2.5 percent.”There’s this element that comes out blaming an entire ethnicity for what is going on. It should be cause for great concern,” he said.Vancouver resident Dakota Holmes, who is Indigenous, said a man told her to “go back to China” before punching her in the head, leaving Holmes on the ground with bruises after she sneezed from seasonal allergies.”He said all these racial slurs,” Holmes recalled. “I’m Indigenous, not from Asia; he didn’t care.”British Columbia Premier John Horgan condemned the rising acts of hate as “unacceptable,” saying that “racism is a virus” and “hate has no place in our province.”But while political leaders, police and community advocates alike condemned the incidents, others want to see more aggressive preventive action by authorities, such as financial support for organizations serving the Chinese-Canadian community, offering victims mental health services, and backing initiatives to educate witnesses on how best to respond.”I would focus the attention, if someone is being verbally abused, on the victim — not the person harassing them,” Louie advised.Some advocates suggested that the racist incidents are not simply a short-term fad, but that the pandemic is bringing long-standing societal prejudices to the surface.Recalling her assault, Ling said it “lit a fire” in her to speak out.”People are afraid of going outside not because of COVID but because of their skin color,” she said. “It’s important for all of us to do something when you see it happening — to not be ashamed or silent, because if many people speak out, that’s how we fight against racism.”center_img Ling is indeed not alone. From spitting and violent attacks, to verbal assaults and vandalism of Chinese cultural sites, Chinese residents of Canada’s third largest city — who make up 26 percent of its population, according to the last census in 2016 — say they feel increasingly unsafe and unwelcome.A new survey obtained by AFP suggests the problem is deeply rooted: one in four British Columbians of Asian descent (70 percent of whom are Chinese) said someone in their household had been targeted with “racial slurs or insults” since March, according to the ResearchCo poll of 1,600 adults.Vancouver police are also investigating 29 anti-Asian incidents over the past two months, seven times more than the same period last year, the police chief revealed.Another Vancouverite who experienced racism during the pandemic helped launch an online reporting form for others to share their experiences anonymously.  Topics :last_img read more

Online trade solution program for ASEAN businesses sees few takers

first_img“In the European Union, a similar [trade solution platform] system known as SOLVIT has seen over 10,000 cases compared with 10 cases in ASEAN,” Vergano said.The EU’s SOLVIT is described by the European Commission as “an informal problem-solving network that can help EU citizens or businesses when their rights are breached by public authorities in another EU member state”.In 2019, SOLVIT reported having handled a total of 2,380 cases that fell within its remit, while also receiving an additional 2,977 complaints that were not within its remit.“The concept is trying to minimize long tariff barriers and measures and to have the private sector talk to the government within a system that is free of charge and fully based on the internet,” Vergano said.He added that the platform provided businesses with an anonymity feature in case they were concerned about possible retaliation as a result of filing their complaints.Businesses can expect to have practical solutions within 40 to 60 days upon having their complaint accepted by the central administrator of the ASSIST website. Once a solution is proposed, they can either accept the proposed solution or reject it and look for other channels to resolve their dispute.Vergano noted, however, that the platform was not a silver bullet that could overcome complicated problems such as government inefficiencies or red tape. It is meant to address a specific problem, he said, but it could help build momentum for change.“If we can establish a pattern of 50, 100 requests to the government, with no solution provided, that government will look terrible and there will be further pressure by other ASEAN member states on that government to actually start providing a solution,” Vergano argued.Robert Kwee, the founder of Alfamart Trading Philippines, said during the webinar that there were no specific regulations that served as an obstacle to trading in ASEAN.“But in reality, many players do not open market opportunities,” he said.Trade attache at the Indonesian embassy in Manila, Lazuardi Nasution, cited on July 30 a case where foreign architects working in the Philippines must take a professional exam.The examination, however, was conducted in Filipino, making it harder for Indonesians to work as architects in the Philippines, Lazuardi noted.Topics : An online platform to help business players resolve cross-border trade issues in the Southeast Asia region has been met with a cold shoulder by the region’s economic community, a European Union (EU)-backed facility has shown.In support of the ASEAN regional integration, the EU has helped establish the trade solution platform, dubbed the ASEAN Solutions for Investments, Services and Trade (ASSIST), through its ASEAN Regional Integration Support by the EU (ARISE) Plus technical facility.Paolo Vergano, a trade facilitation expert at ARISE Plus, said the platform only saw 10 cases lodged so far, with five out of the six cases lodged in 2019 being from business councils or business federations.  “ASEAN businesses are not using ASSIST,” Vergano said during a livestreamed outreach event on July 30, as he urged the region’s businesses to utilize the platform.ASSIST is expected to help ASEAN-based enterprises expedite complaint-filing with other ASEAN governments over cross-border trade issues, including non-tariff measures.The increasingly integrated ASEAN economy follows the introduction of the ASEAN Economic Community (AEC) in 2015. As of 2018, ASEAN was the fifth-largest economy in the world with a total combined gross domestic product (GDP) of US$3 trillion.ASEAN economic integration continued to contribute to the region’s emerging position as a global growth driver, with intra-ASEAN activity accounting for the largest share of ASEAN’s total trade and its foreign investment in 2018, standing at 23 percent and 15.9 percent, respectively, according to the 2019 ASEAN Integration Report.last_img read more

Five Southland Softball Student-Athletes Earn Academic All-America Honors

first_imgFRISCO, Texas – Five Southland softball student-athletes were named to the 2018 Google Cloud Academic All-America® Teams, the College of Sports Information Directors of America announced Monday. Sam Houston State pitcher Lindsey McLeod and Houston Baptist shortstop Demi Janak are third-team selections. McLeod, a 2018 All-Conference Second Team member, set a single-season strikeout record (222) for the Bearkats in her junior season in which she kept a 4.0 GPA as a public health major. Janak, who finished her junior season leading HBU in batting average and home runs, is a 4.0 student as an accounting major. The five total selections are second only to the SEC, which led all conferences with six members. Each Southland member has a 4.0 GPA; of the 30 honorees scattered across the three teams, only 19 members have a perfect GPA. For a complete list of the 2018 Google Cloud Academic All-America® selections, visit here.center_img Nicholls pitcher Megan Landry was selected for the second team after a junior season that saw her win Southland Pitcher of the Year while keeping a 4.0 GPA as a secondary education-English major. Abilene Christian first baseman Brianna Barnhill joins Landry on the second team. Barnhill completed her college career with a spotless GPA as a kinesiology major. Central Arkansas shortstop Kate Myers leads the Southland as the lone pick to the first team. Myers becomes the first student-athlete in program history to earn first-team recognition and just the second to receive All-America honors. Wrapping up her senior season for the Bears, Myers maintained a 4.0 GPA majoring in Biology and minoring in sports psychology. The Tulsa, Oklahoma, native was one of two student-athletes to receive the Southland’s F.L. McDonald Scholarship to be applied toward graduate studies. She will continue her academic career at Oklahoma State’s College of Osteopathic Medicine.last_img read more

Justice for Sammy: Two gangsters get life in prison in shooting death

first_img Fast-forward to Aug. 13, 2005. Sammy was walking down an alley with Juan Pedroza, who had a distinctive limp from a childhood car accident, according to court documents. Diaz, Vega and Betancourt were nearby at a party when they spotted the two. Diaz asked if Pedroza was the “fool who ratted on Clumsy.” It’s unclear if they thought he was Victor Pedroza and mistakenly targeted him. “Let’s (mess) him up,” Betancourt said before he charged toward Pedroza. Betancourt threw the first punch, then Vega jumped in. Pedroza, who had a metal plate in his head, had little use of one arm. Sammy jumped in, trying to fend them off. Moments later, Diaz pulled out a gun and shot him in the head. During Thursday’s hearing, a bald-headed Diaz shot glances at rows of red-eyed relatives and smiled a few times while Vega kept his eyes focused ahead. Diaz’s attorney, Robert Schwartz, said trial witnesses contradicted each other, and his client was not involved in the shooting. “For my client to be convicted under this evidence is a miscarriage,” he said after the sentencing. But when Vega’s attorney asked the judge to reconsider his stiffer sentence, she said, “It’s one arrest after another. If he isn’t a perfect example of recidivism, I don’t know what is.” The lead investigator on the case, Los Angeles police Detective Steve Castro, called the outcome “a great day for justice. Gangs like to intimidate; they don’t like people speaking against them, making crime reports,” said Castro, who attended the sentencing. “It weakens their gang.” Bravo, a housekeeper, sat in the back of the courtroom as the judge spoke. Her stomach knotted. Her heart felt as if someone stepped on it. “It has been hard on me,” she said. “Since that day, I am not the same person anymore.” Afraid of retribution, she and her 13-year-old daughter moved from their North Hollywood home with the help of law enforcement. She was even escorted to her car Thursday by sheriff’s deputies for protection. At home, she keeps a candle burning next to her son’s photograph in her living room. Every birthday, every holiday, the sorrow begins anew. On that August night two years ago, she knew something was wrong. She had just arrived in California the year before after escaping an abusive husband in Texas and had tried so hard to protect her son from violence. “I felt something in my heart,” she said, recalling how she went searching the neighborhood for Sammy that night. “When I went to go look for him, I saw a lot of ambulance and police. They already had him in the bed. I was running and crying and they didn’t let me close to him.” At the hospital, she watched as he clung to life. “I told him how much I love him and I didn’t want to miss him, and not to go,” she said. He died 10 minutes later. For the latest news and observations on crime in Los Angeles and the San Fernando Valley, check out the Daily News’ crime blog by clicking here.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREGame Center: Chargers at Kansas City Chiefs, Sunday, 10 a.m. Van Nuys Superior Court Judge Darlene Schempp sentenced Enrique Diaz, 32, to 40 years to life in prison for shooting Sammy in the head. Sammy had intervened when several other gangsters were beating up his disabled friend, Juan Pedroza, whom they considered a snitch for talking to police about another case. Luis “Wicked” Vega, 28, who participated in the killing, was sentenced to 55 years to life because he had a prior “strike” under the state’s “three strikes” law for using a cane to beat someone. Both maintain their innocence and will appeal, their attorneys said. Another defendant, Marcos “Shyster” Betancourt, who was 14 at the time and struck a deal with prosecutors to testify against Diaz and Vega, is awaiting sentencing. He likely will be sent to the California Youth Authority and be released when he is 25. Prosecutors called the case a classic example of gang intimidation and revenge that ended in the worst way. A few months before the killing, Pedroza’s brother Victor was harassed by Roberto “Clumsy” Fletes, a parolee and North Hollywood Boyz member. Fletes demanded Pedroza pay “taxes” because he believed he was selling drugs on the gang’s turf. But Victor Pedroza refused and went to the police to file a report against Fletes, eventually testifying against him at a parole hearing. VAN NUYS – The day Leticia Bravo’s 15-year-old son was shot to death by gang members for trying to protect his disabled friend is the day her own slow death began. “They killed my son, but they killed me,” she said, tears welling in her eyes. “You don’t die immediately. The pain goes on and you die day by day.” Thursday, when a judge sentenced the two North Hollywood Boyz members to more than 40 years in prison each for killing Sammy Salas, Bravo said she had at least ended the most painful chapter of her life. “I hope some day they will be sorry,” she said. “I don’t know why they did it. It is nothing Sammy did to them.”last_img read more