LIT study highlights student experience of sexual aggression

first_img Previous articleNew phase of Wild Atlantic Way to include LimerickNext articleOpinion – World in Union #RWC2015 Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Advertisement Linkedin WhatsApp Andrew [email protected] up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up ONE in every four students have experienced unwanted and aggressive sexual behaviour, including groping, sexualised verbal abuse and unwanted sexual contact, according to a study conducted at a Limerick third level college.Limerick Institute of Technology (LIT) research collective, Social Science ConneXions, has found that up to 25 per cent of students surveyed earlier this year reported having experienced a “sexually unwanted or aggressive incident”.The survey was conducted online across all four LIT campuses. 338 responses were received and the key findings also showed that five per cent had experienced a non-consensual sexual encounter and five per cent of male respondents had experienced a sexually unwanted or aggressive incident.Karen Sugrue, Sociology lecturer and researcher with Social Science ConneXions said that while there was an enormous amount of evidence that students were particularly vulnerable to sexual assault and unwanted sexual behaviour, they wanted to find out if this was also the case for LIT students.“We’re delighted with the response from the management team at LIT who have taken the issue extremely seriously”, she added.LIT lecturer Jennifer Moran Stritch, who is director of the Loss and Grief research group, said that some people believed that the only type of sexual assault is rape.“We are also aware of the importance of verbal abuse, atmosphere and the sense of feeling intimidated. We want our students to live and study in an environment where they feel safe and know how and where to access supports should they need them”.Mairead Keogh, Vice President of LIT Students Union said that prevention of unwanted or aggressive incidents was the key to ensuring a safer environment for students and the students union strongly support the measures implemented.LIT Registrar Terry Twomey said that LIT had an exemplary record in student safety on campus.“We have had no reported incidents here at LIT, and we take pre-emptive action through our Student Safety Programme to ensure that we maintain our exemplary record. Nonetheless, as part of LIT’s Student Safety Programme, our Social Science Connexions unit carried out a small pilot survey of students on any experience of sexual harassment they might have had”.He added that because LIT had no reported incidents, the negative experiences reported most likely related to life off-campus.“Still, the institute is taking no chances. Last week, LIT introduced a new presentation on consent to all new students as part of our Student Safety Programme. LIT is leading the sector in this way and our objective is to maintain our exemplary record of student safety,” he concluded.National research indicates that only about 1 in 10 incidents are reported. To address this and support students, LIT ran a programme of discussion about consent during September induction days for 1st year students that ties in with the No Grey Areas campaign launched nationally by Minister for Justice Equality and Law Reform, Francis Fitzgerald, last Friday. Emailcenter_img Print Twitter Facebook NewsLIT study highlights student experience of sexual aggressionBy Staff Reporter – September 24, 2015 1100 last_img read more

Vatican will publish Knights Templar trial

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREGame Center: Chargers at Kansas City Chiefs, Sunday, 10 a.m.They include a 14th-century parchment showing that Pope Clement V initially absolved the Templar leaders of heresy, though he did find them guilty of immorality and planned to reform the order, according to the Vatican archives Web site. But pressured by King Philip IV of France, Clement later reversed his decision and suppressed the order in 1312. Only 799 copies of the 300-page volume, Processus Contra Templarios – Latin for Trial against the Templars – are for sale, said Scrinium publishing house, which prints documents from the Vatican’s secret archives. Each will cost $8,377, the publisher said Friday. An 800th copy will go to Pope Benedict XVI, said Barbara Frale, the researcher who found the long-overlooked parchment tucked away in the archives in 2001. The Knights Templar, which ultimately disappeared because of the heresy scandal, recently captivated the imagination of readers of the best-seller The Da Vinci Code, which linked the order to the legend of the Holy Grail. By Frances D’Emilio THE ASSOCIATED PRESS VATICAN CITY – It’s not the Holy Grail, but for fans of The Da Vinci Code and its tantalizing story line about the Knights Templar, it could be the next best thing. Ignored for centuries, documents about the heresy trial of the ancient Christian order discovered in the Vatican’s secret archives are being published in a limited edition – with an $8,377 price tag. The new Vatican work reproduces the entire documentation of the papal hearings convened after Philip IV of France arrested and tortured Templar leaders in 1307 on charges of heresy and immorality. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Cloud Security Using… Social Networks?

first_imgRelated Posts Tags:#cloud#security The issues of cloud/SaaS security have been on my mind since the late 90s when I was working on my first global intranet/extranet project. Personally, I’ve never been terribly concerned with the more lower-level technical details of network architecture, transport protocols or with tedious policy writing; you need good security experts to cover these areas properly. I’ve always been drawn to the more forgivably human downsides to the whole SaaS/Cloud concept like this one: How on earth do you prevent password sharing? I’ve been thinking that the solution may be so obvious, so ubiquitous, that it’s just difficult to see past our own fears: What if we could improve the security of our cloud-based applications by handing over our authentication processes to the social media networks?Steve Henty is an experienced IT Project Manager who has specialized in Web technologies since 1996. He lives in Madrid and is currently working for Toshiba. He can be contacted at [email protected] or on Twitter or at http://www.henty.es.The ProblemYou see them everywhere. Those claims that XYZ Web application is 100% secure because it’s as secure as banking online and uses SSL and allows IP restrictions and uses LDAP authentication and etc. All these security features are useful but at the end of the day we’re still faced with the daunting challenge of convincing users not to give out their passwords either intentionally (e.g. by lending to “friends”) or unintentionally (e.g. written notes lying around). As soon as one person in your organisation has divulged his or her account details the entire system is compromised and all the company information is open to whoever gets hold of the password. What’s worse, there’s no real way of know if or when this has happened – even our careless user may be unaware that someone else is using the same account. I sometimes see references to this problem on the Web but I haven’t seen any serious solutions. It tends to get passed off as irrelevant, as if password security has nothing to do with cloud security. But unfortunately its inevitable effect on adoption blows a big hole in the whole cloud computing concept. So currently the industry doesn’t want to talk about this elephant in the room because it might affect uptake, and consequently businesses are not getting the full picture.With 50% of companies in the UK currently thinking about moving to the cloud this year, we’re going to see an increase in security concerns – that is, as soon as these companies realise they’ve had the wool pulled over their eyes. When Strong Isn’t StrongLet’s take a quick look at the ways cloud computing services are currently attempting to deal with the issues of cloud security and examine how they might fall short.SSL: A common claim you hear is that XYZ app is as secure as online banking because it uses the same technology: SSL. While I agree that it’s important to encrypt communication, this claim is borderline fraudulent. People are inherently motivated to keep their online banking account details a secret whereas an employee may actually become motivated to do the complete opposite.IP Restrictions: Some apps let you restrict access from certain IP addresses. This might work if you’re prepared to forego the benefits of device independence, but to my mind this is one of the great advantages of working in the cloud.LDAP Integration: Some apps allow integration with directories such as the Active Directory. This is great – one less directory to manage. However, in addition to the network security headaches this can bring it doesn’t guarantee that the person using the password is actually the person you hope it is.Enterprise Security: Two-factor authentication with security tokens or a sophisticated PKI implementation work nicely if you have the time and resources. If you have any high-profile users you’ll be wanting this level of security to avoid breaches like the one Twitter faced a few months ago. However, these solutions can be so expensive and time-consuming that even a large enterprise would baulk at the cost of rolling this out to 100% of employees. So for most companies it’s just not a feasible option.On The Radar: In the not-so-distant future we may be using mobile phone SIMs, Electronic IDs or government-issued browser certificates to authenticate. But how about right now? Is there anything else we can be doing now, in 2010, to improve the security of our cloud-based apps?The Solution: Social Media Integration?Solutions often seem counterintuitive at first. What if we could increase security by giving up some control? What if we were to relax our grip a little on the whole identity management and authentication process and let the employee share some of the responsibility?Most employees have a personal online identity already, a personal brand that they are inherently motivated to protect. The have a personal email addresses, blogs, Facebook accounts, LinkedIn accounts – public or semi-public profiles all over the Web. What if we were to allow these social media accounts to connect to our company cloud-based apps and perform the authentication process?This could mean, for example, that an employee would be able to access a company CRM application simply by logging into a Facebook or LinkedIn account. A breach in our application’s security would then only come at the expense of a breach in the security of a user’s personal account. This way the responsibility for maintaining security would be would be shared.Now that our users have a vested interest preventing unauthorised access to company data they might actually start taking to heart all the guidelines about strong passwords we’ve been banging on about for so long.It could also be argued that by spreading the accounts over a number of different social media sites, thereby decentralising the authentication process, potential hackers might be deterred from casual password guessing and brute force attacks.Okay, the idea needs to be developed further and it’s far from perfect. There are certainly issues that need to be addressed regarding adoption, privacy and appropriate checks and controls. However, the technology already exists in the form of APIs, Facebook Connect, OAuth and OpenID and others, and the big social media players now have the critical mass of users you’d need in order to pull off something like this. Even attitudes towards privacy appear to be relaxing, so the timing could be perfect. If my assumptions are right, the missing piece in the cloud security puzzle might be right under our noses, and we’d be able to alleviate some of the fear of cloud computing simply by relinquishing some of our need to control.I’d be very interested in your views on the subject – especially if you know of anyone has already had some experience of implementing this in a production environment or has decided against doing it.Photo credit: Joshua Davis. guest author 1 A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…center_img Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more