Limerick students learn to finance their future

first_imgNewsEducationLimerick students learn to finance their futureBy Liam Togher – April 30, 2014 889 Changes to the Student Support Scheme for people living in Direct Provision Advertisement Print Twitter Previous articleLimerick’s latest prize bond millionaireNext articleLimerick people Keane to support guide dogs Liam Togherhttp://www.limerickpost.ieLiam joined the Limerick Post in December 2012, having previously worked in other local media organisations. He holds an MA in Journalism from the University of Limerick and is particularly interested in sports writing. Students in Limerick colleges to benefit from more than €1.5M funding to assist with online learning RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Limerick schools urged to get involved in STEM challenge STUDENTS from Laurel Hill Secondary School took part in a financial literacy programme under tuition from volunteers from Dell.‘Finance Your Future’ is a six-week programme sponsored by the Citi Foundation, with transition year students around Ireland learning about the importance of financial management, the importance of education and its role in improving potential earning power and using credit and cash wisely.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The programme began in 2012 and has educated more than 3,000 students nationwide in financial literacy modules. Volunteers from a variety of support organisations, including Dell, have delivered the lessons to students in a classroom setting.More than 90 Laurel Hill students enjoyed the programme taught to them by Dell volunteers Siobhan O’Connor, Stephen Martin and Fearghal Carroll, and career guidance counsellor Eithne Lyons said that the students took enormous benefit from ‘Finance Your Future’.“It is an excellent programme. The students learned through group work, interaction and activities – a perfect recipe.“Siobhan, Fearghal and Stephen are great role models for the students, giving them a real taste of life in the workplace and also how good financial decisions impact on their lives now and in the long term. We are grateful to both Citi and Dell for giving our students this opportunity.”center_img Linkedin Email Facebook TAGSCitiDELLeducationEithne LyonsFearghal CarrollfinanceFinance Your FutureLaurel Hill ColáisteSiobhan O’ConnorStephen Martin WhatsApp Education and Training Board serves up award winning standards Limerick social entrepreneurs honoured for their work in response to covid-19 Consultation process on a new action plan for apprenticeship launchedlast_img read more

Carroll Hall wins Hall of the Year while Flaherty, Dunne take women’s, men’s titles

first_imgCourtesy of Aidan Cook Residents of Hall of the Year Carroll Hall attended the Kelly Cares 5K in the fall semester 2020.Even though they lie on the furthest edges of the campus, the residents of Far Quad and East Quad won big this year in the Hall Council Presidents (HPC) Hall of the Year contest. For the 2019-2020 year, Carroll Hall won Hall of the Year, Dunne Hall won Men’s Hall of the Year and Flaherty Hall won Women’s Hall of the Year. Carroll Hall was built in 1906 before becoming a residence hall in 1967. The hall puts on a number of events every year including lake cleanup brigades and group workouts where they partner with other dorms, in addition to hosting their signature events: the Lakeside Music Festival and Carroll Christmas. Carroll’s hall president, senior Aidan Cook said these events were more successful than ever. “This year, the goal we set our eyes on was winning Hall of the Year. We wanted to show campus that our size and location were something to envy, not pity,” Cook said. Additionally, the dorm hosted guest speakers events alongside their Men’s Group discussion sessions. The dorm displayed impressive participation in GreeNDot training and won the highest Dorm Based Athletic Attendance Contest, both key components to the HPC’s point-scoring in the contest. They also had the most residents participate in the Kelly Cares 5K. Cook said the long walk to Carroll brings the residents together. “During this return journey,” he said. “We physically distance ourselves from the stresses of campus and classes and come together again in a home where we know, with no exaggeration, every other resident’s name and interests and story. Because of this, we can readily support each other and band together to achieve goals we collectively share.”Cook thanked the HPC and other dorm leaders.“Whether we collaborated with their dorms, sought advice from them in trying to plan new programming or built new friendships with them, these other campus leaders were always there for us to turn to,” he said. Carroll Hall rector Eric Styles said Cook and vice president, senior Jacob Stellon played a huge role in this year’s award, who collectively came up with the Carroll Kitchen food sales initiative. “This is my fourth year as rector, which means the current seniors started with me,” Styles said. “That makes them special to me. I know them really well and have asked much from them, and they delivered. We also had a higher number of seniors elect to remain on campus. It helps to keep the community more mature. They are looking toward their future, and the younger residents see that.” Both Stellon and Cook praised the participation of Carroll residents. “Our community was especially successful this year for a long list of reasons,” Stellon said. “But it all comes back to the fact that we, all 100 of us, worked hard to make it this way.”Built in 2016, the Flaherty bears have resided on East Quad for four years.“In my opinion, Flaherty Hall is so special because of the identity that we have acquired over the past four years,” Flaherty’s president, senior Catherine Dieckman said. “We are no longer being confused with Farley, nor are we considered just a boujeer form of Pangborn. Over the past four years, we have become a dorm that is home to fierce, strong, compassionate women.” Flaherty works each year with Beacon Children’s Hospital to fundraise for monetary and supply drives in addition to holding a DVD collection. They also have established a textbook exchange program, support the Boys and Girls Club of South Bend and the Center for the Homeless and boasted a percentage increase of GreeNDot participation from 19% to 28%. According to Dieckman, some of Flaherty’s most beloved traditions include their signature events such as Project Pumpkin Pie, an event in November where Flaherty’s residents bake 80 pies for the South Bend Center for the Homeless. “This is one of our favorite service events of the year, and we continued this tradition from when the Pangborn community moved into Flaherty,” Dieckman said.The hall also fosters an internal community through their weekly food services, Bearly Baked on Monday nights and Fronana on Thursday nights. Additionally, the hall hosts a barbecue called BearBQs in the fall and spring. “Our hall government makes all of the food, and our girls love it,” Dieckman said. In their presentation to HPC, Dieckman said she and her vice presidents focused on the improvement of their signature events, their work with Beacon Children’s Hospital and the diverse events they held with other dorms. Dieckman also created a one-second-a-day video showcasing the community and work of the residents of Flaherty Hall during her term, which was presented to HPC.“Even though Flaherty Formal, Honey Week — our spirit week — and Flaherty Females Weekend did not occur this year due to the shortening of the spring semester on campus, our Bears still prioritized making memories in the small ways,” Dieckman said. The Men’s Hall of the Year, Dunne Hall, was built in 2016, on East Quad alongside Flaherty Hall. The Sentinels’ signature events include the DunneDance Film Festival — which was held over Zoom this year — and the Dunne Funne Runne. The dorm began a number of new initiatives this year including a parent’s weekend and a mentorship program for its first year residents. The Sentinel president, senior George Lyman said his favorite tradition is the dorm’s annual Jimmy Dunne feast week. “We started out the week with the whole dorm having a steak dinner at South Dining Hall on Sunday night,” he said. “For the rest of the week, we had a bowling night, a Spikeball tournament, a chicken McNugget eating contest and an informal formal at Jays Lounge. That week really brought us together as a hall and helped strengthen our community.” Lyman said the dorm’s presentation focused on improvement. “We wanted to show how much the hall community had grown in one year,” he said. “We talked about all the events that had been started in Dunne this year, like parents’ weekend, weekly service trips to Saint Adalbert’s and more and then talked about how we built on events already created.” Lyman said the dorm’s leadership saw over 100 people attend some hall councils, and he thanked Dunne’s rector Fr. Matthew Kuczora. “This is his last year as our rector, and it is clear to everyone who has lived in Dunne he is truly a special person and deserves some recognition,” he said. “We are going to miss him a lot next year, but the foundations he set up for Dunne will live on.”Tags: Carroll Hall, dunne hall, flaherty hall, Hall of the year, HPC, Men’s Hall of the Year, Women’s Hall of the Yearlast_img read more

Analysts: More Global Momentum Toward Renewables

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Bloomberg New Energy Finance:The continuing plunge in costs for solar and wind energy, and for lithium-ion batteries, means that market opportunities will keep opening up for clean power, storage and electric vehicles. In 2017, we saw new records set for the tariffs in renewable energy auctions around the world, at levels – for instance $18.60 per MWh for onshore wind in Mexico – that would have been unthinkable only two or three years ago.In batteries, we estimate that lithium-ion pack prices fell by no less than 24% last year, opening up the prospect, with further cost improvements, of EVs undercutting conventional, internal combustion engine cars on both lifetime and upfront cost by the mid-to-late 2020s.Detailed analysis by our teams suggests that these cost reduction trends are set to remain in place in the years ahead, thanks to economies of scale and technological improvements – although no trend is a straight line, given the importance of the supply-demand balance and commodity prices.The upswing in the world economy in recent months could also be helpful for the transition in energy and transport, since it has bolstered oil and coal (and, to a lesser extent, gas) prices, so tipping the competitive comparison a little further toward wind, solar and EVs. Investor confidence in our sectors has certainly been quietly improving, with the WilderHill New Energy Global Innovation Index, or NEX, which tracks the performance of around 100 clean energy and transport stocks around the world, climbing 28% between the end of 2016 and January 11 this year.However, and this is where the Dark Side comes in, there is room for concern about some of the risks in the wider world at the start of 2018, and about how waves created outside could wash into the energy transition. One particular risk is the uneasy co-existence of the most buoyant financial markets for more than a decade with the potential for a political or geopolitical shock – perhaps a collision between President Donald Trump and Robert Mueller, the special counsel investigating Russian interference in the U.S. presidential election; or a miscalculation on the Korean peninsula; or a military clash between Iran and Saudi Arabia.There is a more conventional market risk. A healthier world economy has raised the likelihood of tightening monetary policies in not just the U.S. but also Europe and Japan. Long-term interest rates have recently been rising – the U.S. 10-year up from 2% in September to more than 2.5% now – and a bigger move in the same direction could start to affect the cost of capital, and therefore the relative competitiveness, of high-capex, low-opex technologies such as wind and solar.The Trump administration will continue to pull every policy lever it can find to revitalize U.S. coal-fired power generation – but will not slow coal’s inexorable and inevitable decline. We are not sticking our noses out too far on this one, actually. Already, 2018 is scheduled to be the second biggest year in U.S. history for coal plant retirements, with 13GW of projects slated to shutter. A particularly cold first week of 2018 could boost the overall coal megawatt-hours a bit, but the total amount of coal capacity online will continue to decline.  In addition, on January 8, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission rejected a request from Energy Secretary Rick Perry to have U.S. power markets reward coal and nuclear plants for the supposed “resilience” they provide to the grid. FERC, which historically prides itself on independence, rejected Perry’s request with a bipartisan 5-0 vote.The critical supports for U.S. wind and solar remain their tax credits, which survived last year’s tax-cut legislation relatively intact. While there are outstanding questions on how U.S. projects will now get financed in the wake of the tax changes, the pipeline looks relatively healthy for 2018.  However, if Trump chooses to impose trade tariffs or other penalties on foreign-manufactured PV cells, it could boost local prices for PV modules and render a meaningful portion of the U.S. solar project pipeline economically unviable. Ironically, Trump would likely justify such a move by professing his support for solar as two companies with U.S.-based manufacturing are pushing for the tariffs.The energy transition will continue apace in Asia’s two largest power systems, India and China, though the two countries face very different opportunities and challenges. India had a mixed 2017. While a decent 12GW of renewable energy were built, new investment in clean energy fell by 20%, as a result of a number of canceled auctions and power contract renegotiations. On the other hand, India also had a poor year on fossil fuel additions in 2017, with a significant number of projects slipping on their commissioning deadlines. The lag between financing and construction means that Asia’s third-largest economy is likely to see only about 10GW of renewable capacity built in 2018, while as much as 13GW of fossil fuel plants are commissioned, many of them the uncompleted projects from last year.However, 2018 will be the last year in which fossil fuels outpaces renewables in India. From 2019 onwards, greater policy certainty for renewables and a shrinking coal pipeline will mean more renewables built than fossil fuels each year. This will be a major milestone for a country that most see as a key battleground for the fight to stabilize global greenhouse emissions growth.China’s solar fever will continue to rage in 2018 (see Prediction 2, above). In 2018, China will also reach a turning point where it will build more “distribution-grid-connected” solar projects than the larger “transmission-grid-connected” projects and it will also double the volume of behind-the-meter solar projects built.More: The Force Is With Clean Energy: 10 Predictions for 2018 Analysts: More Global Momentum Toward Renewableslast_img read more

Millennials more likely to swap jobs, industries: LinkedIn study

first_img 21SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Millennials have a reputation for job-hopping more than other generations. And according to a new LinkedIn report, they not only switch jobs — they also hop industries.When it comes to work, millennials are ambitious and look at their careers differently than other generations. “Based on U.S. job switching activity in 2016, millennials were 50% more likely to relocate and 16% more likely to switch industries for a new job than nonmillennials,” the report says. They’re moving into the fields of technology, health care, auto/aerospace and finance, and they expect certain things once they get there.When it comes to the job itself, millennials are looking for a strong career path and employee development opportunities, and if they can’t advance where they are, they’ll just jump ship again.But the job isn’t the be-all and end-all. The report adds that most millennials want steady jobs that provide them with regular benefits and paychecks. “This may explain the growth we see in millennials joining more traditional industries like health care and finance,” the report says. continue reading »last_img read more

Basketball fan seeks Pink Boots

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Chris Kent is a madman – or a hopeless romantic.On the one hand, the Syracuse men’s basketball fan obsesses over a woman he talked to, off-handedly, twice. He’s 43. She’s … maybe 20? He doesn’t even know her name. All he knows is she wore pink boots the only time he saw her.Then again, his feelings are visceral. He’s considering driving over from Rochester to the Syracuse campus, hoping he runs into the girl of his dreams. He just wants to talk to her, find out her name. He hesitates calling this a crush. He’s not one for karma, but there’s something profound about this.‘I’ve been married,’ Kent says,’ and I never felt this way about my wife.’Chris Kent is something all right. He’s a Rochester-native divorcee with children. He attended the Syracuse-Providence game on Feb. 26, Senior Day, and sat next to a woman. For over a week after the game, he placed an ad in this paper requesting that the pink-booted vixen get in touch with him.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSo far, he’s gotten no responses.So which is it? Is Kent the most romantic man in Upstate New York? Or is he the biggest creep since TLC released their single?Even he doesn’t know.It probably depends on the outcome. Pink Boots and Kent could reunite and fall deeply in love. Or, after reading this, she could enter the Witness Protection Program.‘I hope you don’t think I’m some kind of weirdo,’ Kent says. ‘I’m certain there are (people who think that). … Some people could read this and think, ‘This guy could be a whacko.’ But this is really out of character for me. I’m really a shy, reserved kind of guy.’So reserved, he withheld talking to the woman of his desire. Since Kent ruminates through that fateful day endlessly, let’s run through it, too, Feb. 26.At 9 a.m., a languid Kent shuddered into consciousness as his telephone rang. His brother asked him if he’d like to go to the Syracuse-Providence game, scheduled for later that day.Longing to attend a game this season, Kent agreed. Considering traffic and the noon start, the brothers arrived just as the crowd ended its opening-game clap.As he shuffled into his seat, he passed by a nubile darling.‘Immediately, I felt something,’ he says.He would be sitting next to this lovely lady all game.Twice in the course of their ensuing venture did the two interact. Kent, an inspired fan, jumped from his seat at one emotional moment, fortuitously knocking his keys against the lady.He apologized. She smiled forgivingly. His first interaction with Pink Boots ended.As the game dragged on, he dared himself to speak to her. Through his mind raced potential inquiries. What’s your major? Do you come to many games?‘There was some eye contact,’ Kent says, ‘but not much. I don’t know. I don’t know if she’s interested or not.’Instead, the reticent elder withheld, figuring these feelings would pass once the game ended and his life resumed.Soon, the game did end. As Pink Boots started exiting, her escape was blocked by other slow-moving fans clogging the aisle. Kent noticed an opportunity.Stepping onto the bleachers, he spoke.‘Here you go,’ he said, directing the woman to the other side, where an easier escape path presented itself.Within seconds, she left. His feelings lingered.Even today, Kent’s passion runs deep. In the ensuing 25 days, Kent’s life has been consumed by reuniting with Pink Boots. He considered his options. He tried rationalizing this silly crush out of his head. He tried to reason with himself.His youngest son, with him at the game, told Kent they were on the Jumbotron. So Kent devoted his time to tracking down a video. His search ended in vain.Clearly, though, forgetting this woman wasn’t an option.As Pink Boots continued running through his mind, Kent consulted companions across a broad age range. They all suggested he pursue it, considering he felt so strongly.Soon after, he devised the idea of placing his ad.Still without a response, he is considering coming back to SU soon. (He’s off work Thursday), hanging around Marshall Street and praying she passes him.‘I’d definitely recognize her,’ Kent says. ‘If I never see her again, I’ll carry around that image in my head for the rest of my life.’And if Kent runs into her?‘I think I would probably stammer out a hello,’ he says, ‘and ask her if she remembered me. And ask if I could talk to her. I don’t know. I guess I’d have to read her reaction.‘I’m willing to risk looking foolish, which isn’t something I’m usually willing to do, to find out what her name is. That’s my biggest query right now.So Pink Boots, if you’re out there, Chris Kent wants you to know something.‘Please help,’ he says. ‘Don’t be shy. I’m not a weirdo.’Scott Lieber is a junior magazine major. E-mail him at [email protected] Published on March 21, 2005 at 12:00 pmcenter_img Commentslast_img read more