Crowdfunding campaign for Limerick filmmaker’s New York ‘Narcan’ venture

first_img Previous articleLimerick student’s design wins Dyson awardNext articleBig turnout for Cliona’s Foundation cycle Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie Email NewsLocal NewsCrowdfunding campaign for Limerick filmmaker’s New York ‘Narcan’ ventureBy Alan Jacques – September 4, 2015 691 Vanishing Ireland podcast documenting interviews with people over 70’s, looking for volunteers to share their stories Facebook Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live TAGSlimerickMalachy McCourtNarcannew yorkPeter McNamara WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Advertisement by Alan [email protected] up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up AN online crowdfunding campaign is underway to help complete production of a short film by Limerick director Peter McNamara.Inspired by his time living and working in New York, ‘Narcan’ tells the story of Sean Ryan, an Irish paramedic working the unsympathetic streets of the ‘Big Apple’.The cast includes Malachy McCourt and Limerick actor Peter Halpin, who played the writer and actor in ‘Angela’s Ashes’, which was based on the life of his older brother, Pulitzer prize winning author Frank McCourt.The story unfolds as the film’s central character, Sean, toils to manage a fractured personal life. His only son refuses to speak to him and the void between himself and his wife Sinead, grows larger with every passing day. During the course of a 12-hour shift, life-changing decisions with irrevocable consequences must be made.According to Peter McNamara, ‘Narcan’ is a film about family separation and how it’s become a commonplace in society.” I wanted to capture a glimpse inside a very stressful job and, as the film plays out, Sean’s psychological state is tested as he stretches the moral boundaries,” he explains.“For months, we prepared and analyzed the script multiple times, we needed every character to be recognizable and I think you’ll find elements of yourself in each and every one of them.”After assembling a small crew of 15, cameras rolled inside the locker room of one of New York’s busiest emergency stations and so began the rollercoaster ride shooting of ‘Narcan’.“All members of the cast and crew were pushed to the limit and sometimes beyond, all in the name of art. Everybody shared my vision and worked tirelessly to bring it to life. I’m so proud of each and everyone who was part of the ‘Narcan’ team.“It was a life changing experience and now I know that New York is where I want to be based making beautiful films for the foreseeable future,” he told the Limerick Post.Co-funded with Soberanis Productions, a crowdfunding campaign has been kick-started to complete the film. For more details see https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/narcan-short-movie#/center_img Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Print Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Linkedinlast_img read more

Two arrests in Derry as part of dissident republican investigation

first_img Twitter Two arrests in Derry as part of dissident republican investigation Previous articleBloody Sunday families offered compensationNext articleCrisis in the gardaí “growing by the day” – Deputy MacLochlain News Highland Google+ Twitter Google+ WhatsApp Dail to vote later on extending emergency Covid powers News Facebook Pinterest By News Highland – February 14, 2013 center_img WhatsApp Dail hears questions over design, funding and operation of Mica redress scheme Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR PSNI and Gardai urged to investigate Adams’ claims he sheltered on-the-run suspect in Donegal Facebook Detectives from the PSNIs Serious Crime Branch have arrested two men in Derry on suspicion of dissident republican activity.The men aged 43 and 44 have been taken to Antrim Serious Crime Suite for questioning.It’s not been confirmed what specific incidents, if any, the arrests are linked to. HSE warns of ‘widespread cancellations’ of appointments next week Man arrested in Derry on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences released Pinterestlast_img read more

Healthy dose of religion

first_imgPeople who attended religious services at least once a week were significantly less likely to die from “deaths of despair,” including deaths related to suicide, drug overdose, and alcohol poisoning, according to new research led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The study showed that the association between service attendance and lower risk of deaths from despair was somewhat stronger for women than for men.“Despair is something that can confront anyone dealing with severe difficulties or loss. While the term ‘deaths of despair’ was originally coined in the context of working class Americans struggling with unemployment, it is a phenomenon that is relevant more broadly, such as to the health care professionals in our study who may be struggling with excessive demands and burnout, or to anyone facing loss. As such, we need to look for important community resources that can protect against it,” said Tyler VanderWeele, John L. Loeb and Frances Lehman Loeb Professor of Epidemiology at Harvard Chan School. VanderWeele is also director of the Human Flourishing Program and co-director of the Initiative on Health, Religion and Spirituality at Harvard University.The study was published online today in JAMA Psychiatry.Religion may be a social determinant of health, and previous research has shown that attending religious services may be associated with a lower risk of various factors related to despair, including heavy drinking, substance misuse, and suicidality.For this study, researchers analyzed data from the Nurses’ Health Study II on 66,492 women as well as data from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study on 43,141 men. Among the women, there were 75 deaths from despair: 43 suicides, 20 deaths from poisoning, and 12 deaths from liver disease and cirrhosis. Among the men there were 306 deaths from despair: 197 suicides, 6 deaths from poisoning, and 103 deaths from liver diseases and cirrhosis. The study showed that women who attended services at least once per week had a 68 percent lower risk of death from despair compared to those never attending services. After adjusting for numerous variables, the study showed that women who attended services at least once per week had a 68 percent lower risk of death from despair compared to those never attending services. Men who attended services at least once per week had a 33 percent lower risk of death from despair.The study authors noted that religious participation may serve as an important antidote to despair and an asset for sustaining a sense of hope and meaning. They also wrote that religion may be associated with strengthened psychosocial resilience by fostering a sense of peace and positive outlook, and promoting social connectedness.“These results are perhaps especially striking amidst the present COVID-19 pandemic,” said Ying Chen, research associate and data scientist at the Human Flourishing Program at Harvard’s Institute for Quantitative Social Science, and first author of the paper. “They are striking in part because clinicians are facing such extreme work demands and difficult conditions, and in part because many religious services have been suspended. We need to think what might be done to extend help to those at risk for despair.”Other authors from Harvard Chan School include Howard Koh and Ichiro Kawachi. Michael Botticelli of the Grayken Center for Addiction at Boston Medical Center was also a co-author.Funding for the study came from Templeton Foundation grants 52125 and 61075, and from National Institutes of Health grant CA222147. The Nurses’ Health Study II is supported by grants U01 CA176726 and R01 CA67262 from the NIH, and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study is supported by grants UM1 CA167552 and R01 HL35464 from the NIH.last_img read more