Oxford Vice-Chancellor is third highest paid in UK

first_imgThe Vice-Chancellor (VC) of Oxford University was the third highest paid Russell Group VC in 2015-16, new figures reveal.The total remuneration paid to the former VC Andrew Hamilton, and his successor Louise Richardson, who took over the post in January 2016, was £442,000.This sees an increase of one per cent on the previous year’s salary, but an overall decrease in the total earnings from £462,000—including pensions and benefits—which had made Hamilton the highest paid UK Vice-Chancellor in 2014-15, according to an earlier University and College Union (UCU) report.The Oxford UCU criticised the news, noting that staff at Oxford University have some of the highest levels of additional employment and work casualisation in the country.The figures were revealed in analysis by Times Higher Education (THE), which found that on average, leaders of the UK’s Russell Group universities take home almost six per cent more than they did two years ago.During the same period, university staff took a one per cent increase in pay, staging a two-day walkout in May.Oxford University was eager to point out that the increase in Richardson’s and Hamilton’s joint earnings for the 2015–2016 financial year, which amounted to £384,000, was in line with a pay rise for all University staff.A University spokesperson told Cherwell: “The Vice-Chancellor’s salary for the seven months to 31 July, 2016 was £204,000. She received no benefits. Pro-rata, the present VC’s salary represents a one per cent increase on her predecessor’s salary for 2014-15. This is in line with the one per cent pay rise received by all University staff.”Louise Richardson, who had previously served as the Vice-Chancellor at St Andrews University, became the Oxford VC on 1 January 2016, with a promise to “tackle elitism”.News of the nation-wide pay increase for Vice Chancellors has been criticised by the University and College Union (UCU).The President of the Oxford UCU branch, Dr Garrick Taylor, told Cherwell: “It has unfortunately come as no surprise that VC pay has again increased so much while university staff have seen consistent real terms pay cuts, as universities have being doing this year on year.“All over the country professional and academic staff in universities are struggling as rent and house prices go up but pay is depressed. The situation is even worse in Oxford, which has among the highest rent and house prices in the country, and we are increasingly seeing staff taking on additional employment on top of their already demanding roles. On top of this Oxford has amongst the highest level of university staff casualisation in the country, meaning a lack of job security on top of real terms pay cuts.“We hope that this year the universities will attempt to redress the balance and give staff an above inflation pay rise in the same manner that they have been giving their VCs.”However, the Russell Group Director General, Dr Wendy Piatt, defended the pay increases, telling THE that “many vice chancellors have accepted only very modest increases” and that pay levels were set by independent committees that include “expert representatives from outside the sector”.The Vice-Chancellor’s office has been contacted for comment.last_img read more

Pogba, Rashford fit for Premier League restart — Solskjaer

first_imgRelatedPosts EPL: Gunners gun for West Ham scalp EPL: Red Devils attack Palace Leeds host first Premier League game after 16 years Manchester United manager Ole Gunnar Solskjaer has said Paul Pogba and Marcus Rashford are fully fit and ready to return when the Premier League restarts.Rashford has not featured since January after tests revealed a double stress fracture in his back, while Pogba has been “frustrated” with metatarsal and ankle injuries this season. “They’re looking good, they’ve joined training now and they’ve done everything the other boys have been doing,” Solskjaer told the club’s website.“When we get started, it looks like we can have a full squad to choose from.”With both players unavailable, United signed Odion Ighalo and Bruno Fernandes in January and went on an 11-game unbeaten run in all competitions before the coronavirus halted the sport.However, sources told ESPN that United face the prospect of losing Ighalo this week with talks to extend his loan from Shanghai Shenhua at an impasse.United have been training in small groups at their Carrington base while remaining compliant with social distancing measures, and Solskjaer said the players have returned in good spirits. “We’re back in training which has been great,” Solskjaer added. “The boys have been fantastic, the weather’s been good and they’ve enjoyed it.“Hopefully now we’ve proved we can do this safely and we can move to the next step. It’s been really enjoyable being on the training ground again.“Everyone’s looking sharp, everyone’s been in with a good mood and we’ve been splitting up in groups so [working in] fours and fives together and they’ve really done well.“Hopefully, they can as I said, step up and go to bigger training groups but so far it’s been good.”Tags: English Premier LeagueFITNESSMarcus RashfordOle Gunnar SolskjaerPaul Pogbalast_img read more

Monmouth Medical Center Hosts Geriatric Education Program

first_imgLONG BRANCH – Results from the most recent census shows more than 12 million Americans are between the ages of 75 and 94. With an estimated 77 million baby boomers in the midst of turning 65, and fully reaching that age by 2030, the need for geriatric care continues to grow.Monmouth Medical Center, a Barnabas Health Facility, recently held a geriatric continuing education program for medical professionals on meeting the complex challenges of caring for the elderly. Topics covered during the program included: transitions in care for the frail elderly; the three most prevalent diagnoses in the elderly – delirium, dementia and depression; the geriatric patient assessment; differences in geriatrics from a pharmacology standpoint; and palliative care in the frail and elderly.Attendees of the workshop heard from a panel of experts, including Joan Wills, R.N., M.P.A, transitions in care coordinator; Dr. Priya Angi, a geriatrician; Angela Soldivieri, a nurse practitioner in geriatrics; Michelle Schork, Pharm.D., geriatrics; and Dr. Jessica Israel, section chief geriatrics, pain and palliative care.(left to right): Michelle Schork, Pharm.D., geriatrics; Priya Angi, M.D, geriatrician; Jessica Israel, M.D., section chief, Pain and Palliative Care; Angela Soldivieri, A.P.N., nurse practitioner, geriatrics and Joan Wills, R.N., M.P.A, transitions in care coordinator.Monmouth Medical Center recently introduced a dedicated geriatric emergency medicine (GEM) unit to better meet the complex needs of these patients. Older patients typically have more complex medical conditions, stay longer in emergency departments for more extensive testing and treatment regimens and are more likely to be admitted and to require critical care.Vulnerable patients, age 65 years and older, with dementia and other chronic conditions can benefit from a new and innovative Transitions Program at Monmouth Medical Center. Funded through a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation grant, the Barnabas Health Transitions Program for the Comprehensive Care of the Frail Elderly with Dementia screens eligible patients to implement the core components of the program, which include patient and caregiver education, prescription reconciliation and education, development of a detailed, patient-specific My Care Plan, and follow-up care and home visits.Additional information on the GEM Unit, Transitions Program and other geriatric services are available by visiting the Monmouth Medical Center website at www.barnabashealth.org/hospitals/monmouth_medical/services/geriatric_emergency_specialneeds.html.last_img read more