Body Of Missing Swimmer In Chautauqua Lake Recovered, Identified

first_imgBEMUS POINT — Deputies have identified the missing swimmer whose body was recovered Monday afternoon in Chautauqua Lake.According to the Chautauqua County Sheriff’s Office 46-year-old Brian Twardeski, of Jamestown, was swimming with a female and three children in the lake Sunday afternoon when he went missing after large waves from an incoming storm pulled him under water.The Chautauqua County Water Emergency Team was dispatched to assist navigation units in a search of the area along with the Bemus Point, Ashville, and Lakewood Fire Departments.Officials called off the search at 5:00 p.m. Sunday afternoon due to inclement weather but resumed their search on Monday morning around 7:00 a.m. The Chautauqua County Water Emergency Team assisted by the New York State Police Underwater Recovery Team located Twardeski using sonar around 11:30 a.m. Monday with his body being recovered by divers at around 12:00 p.m. Monday afternoon.last_img read more

Analysts: More Global Momentum Toward Renewables

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Bloomberg New Energy Finance:The continuing plunge in costs for solar and wind energy, and for lithium-ion batteries, means that market opportunities will keep opening up for clean power, storage and electric vehicles. In 2017, we saw new records set for the tariffs in renewable energy auctions around the world, at levels – for instance $18.60 per MWh for onshore wind in Mexico – that would have been unthinkable only two or three years ago.In batteries, we estimate that lithium-ion pack prices fell by no less than 24% last year, opening up the prospect, with further cost improvements, of EVs undercutting conventional, internal combustion engine cars on both lifetime and upfront cost by the mid-to-late 2020s.Detailed analysis by our teams suggests that these cost reduction trends are set to remain in place in the years ahead, thanks to economies of scale and technological improvements – although no trend is a straight line, given the importance of the supply-demand balance and commodity prices.The upswing in the world economy in recent months could also be helpful for the transition in energy and transport, since it has bolstered oil and coal (and, to a lesser extent, gas) prices, so tipping the competitive comparison a little further toward wind, solar and EVs. Investor confidence in our sectors has certainly been quietly improving, with the WilderHill New Energy Global Innovation Index, or NEX, which tracks the performance of around 100 clean energy and transport stocks around the world, climbing 28% between the end of 2016 and January 11 this year.However, and this is where the Dark Side comes in, there is room for concern about some of the risks in the wider world at the start of 2018, and about how waves created outside could wash into the energy transition. One particular risk is the uneasy co-existence of the most buoyant financial markets for more than a decade with the potential for a political or geopolitical shock – perhaps a collision between President Donald Trump and Robert Mueller, the special counsel investigating Russian interference in the U.S. presidential election; or a miscalculation on the Korean peninsula; or a military clash between Iran and Saudi Arabia.There is a more conventional market risk. A healthier world economy has raised the likelihood of tightening monetary policies in not just the U.S. but also Europe and Japan. Long-term interest rates have recently been rising – the U.S. 10-year up from 2% in September to more than 2.5% now – and a bigger move in the same direction could start to affect the cost of capital, and therefore the relative competitiveness, of high-capex, low-opex technologies such as wind and solar.The Trump administration will continue to pull every policy lever it can find to revitalize U.S. coal-fired power generation – but will not slow coal’s inexorable and inevitable decline. We are not sticking our noses out too far on this one, actually. Already, 2018 is scheduled to be the second biggest year in U.S. history for coal plant retirements, with 13GW of projects slated to shutter. A particularly cold first week of 2018 could boost the overall coal megawatt-hours a bit, but the total amount of coal capacity online will continue to decline.  In addition, on January 8, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission rejected a request from Energy Secretary Rick Perry to have U.S. power markets reward coal and nuclear plants for the supposed “resilience” they provide to the grid. FERC, which historically prides itself on independence, rejected Perry’s request with a bipartisan 5-0 vote.The critical supports for U.S. wind and solar remain their tax credits, which survived last year’s tax-cut legislation relatively intact. While there are outstanding questions on how U.S. projects will now get financed in the wake of the tax changes, the pipeline looks relatively healthy for 2018.  However, if Trump chooses to impose trade tariffs or other penalties on foreign-manufactured PV cells, it could boost local prices for PV modules and render a meaningful portion of the U.S. solar project pipeline economically unviable. Ironically, Trump would likely justify such a move by professing his support for solar as two companies with U.S.-based manufacturing are pushing for the tariffs.The energy transition will continue apace in Asia’s two largest power systems, India and China, though the two countries face very different opportunities and challenges. India had a mixed 2017. While a decent 12GW of renewable energy were built, new investment in clean energy fell by 20%, as a result of a number of canceled auctions and power contract renegotiations. On the other hand, India also had a poor year on fossil fuel additions in 2017, with a significant number of projects slipping on their commissioning deadlines. The lag between financing and construction means that Asia’s third-largest economy is likely to see only about 10GW of renewable capacity built in 2018, while as much as 13GW of fossil fuel plants are commissioned, many of them the uncompleted projects from last year.However, 2018 will be the last year in which fossil fuels outpaces renewables in India. From 2019 onwards, greater policy certainty for renewables and a shrinking coal pipeline will mean more renewables built than fossil fuels each year. This will be a major milestone for a country that most see as a key battleground for the fight to stabilize global greenhouse emissions growth.China’s solar fever will continue to rage in 2018 (see Prediction 2, above). In 2018, China will also reach a turning point where it will build more “distribution-grid-connected” solar projects than the larger “transmission-grid-connected” projects and it will also double the volume of behind-the-meter solar projects built.More: The Force Is With Clean Energy: 10 Predictions for 2018 Analysts: More Global Momentum Toward Renewableslast_img read more

Scottish bookies urge rethink on ‘crazy’ reopening plans

first_img Submit Scottish bookmakers have slammed Holyrood’s decision to reopen betting shops without chairs or live racing, stating that the ruling is ‘crazy’ and a ‘slap in the face’ for bookies which have most likely been struggling during the lockdown period.Scotland’s 900 betting shops – employing around 4,500 people – have been closed since March as part of the national effort to combat the spread of Covid-19.But while shops have been given the green light to reopen on 29 June, the government has imposed strict measures with shops only permitted to open ‘for the purpose of placing bets only’.In addition, the betting shops have been told that all gaming machines must be switched off to avoid the spread of coronavirus.John Heaton, chairman of Scotbet, Scotland’s largest independent bookmaker with 30 betting shops employing 100 people, said: “It seems to me that this policy has been devised by someone who has never been in a betting shop. Dozens of customers hanging around watching the TV is a thing of the past. People come in, watch a race and leave again.“The whole thing is just crazy, and a real slap in the face for an industry which has done its bit for the national effort to tackle Covid-19. I hope that, even at this late stage, the Scottish Government will think again.”In contrast, betting shops in England reopened on 15 June, with anti-Covid measures such as “sneeze screens” and hand sanitisers to protect staff and customers.Michael Dugher, chief executive of the Betting and Gaming Council, said: “Betting shops make a significant contribution to the economy, employing thousands of people, and they provide a safe play for the millions of Scots who like an occasional flutter.“Banning betting shops in Scotland from showing live racing and talking away chairs for punters to sit on suggests a complete lack of understanding of how betting shops operate.“For many of our customers, a trip to the bookies is something to look forward to after three months in lockdown. Yet the Scottish Government would deny them the right to sit and spend a few moments filling in a betting slip or watching a live race with friends, all sitting apart at a safe distance.“And it’s frankly ludicrous that a punter can watch live coverage of a Scottish horse race in a betting shop in Carlisle, but not a few miles over the border in Gretna. We share the Scottish Government’s determination to keep customers and staff safe. It is perfectly possible to limit the number of people in a shop at any one time, just like in the rest of high street retail.“I’ve heard the Scottish Government talk about ‘standing up for Scotland’, but taking away chairs in betting shops takes this to a new level. It’s frankly ridiculous.” Share BGC lauds success of whistle to whistle ban August 21, 2020 StumbleUpon UK gambling adopts toughest online advertising code to protect underage audiences August 27, 2020 Share BGC calls for updates to ‘outdated’ payment regulations August 21, 2020 Related Articleslast_img read more

New faces in England women and girls’ squads

first_img Bel Wardle, who won the Portuguese women’s amateur last weekend, is among 10 players in the England Golf women’s squad for 2018.Wardle (pictured), also the English women’s open and English girls’ champion, moves up from the girls’ squad, alongside three other players.They are Lily May Humphreys, whose four wins in 2017 included the British girls’ title; Annabell Fuller who was runner-up to Wardle in Portugal; and her older sister and fellow international Sammy Fuller.Sammy Fuller is one of five players who are US-based while they study at university in America. The others are Curtis Cup player Alice Hewson, Emma Allen, Louisa Brunt and India Clyburn.The squad is completed by Georgia Price and Sophie Lamb, who was leading amateur at the Ricoh Women’s British Open.The England Golf girls’ squad includes five new players, who join established members Martha Lewis, Mimi Rhodes, Amelia Williamson and Hannah Screen, the runner-up in the British women’s stroke play. They are Yorkshire’s Charlotte Heath and Nicola Slater; Buckinghamshire’s Thalia Kirby, who was runner-up in the English U16 girls’ championship; Gloucestershire’s Ebonie Lewis and Cumbria’s Caitlin Whitehead.Women’s squadEmma Allen, 21, Meon Valley, HampshireLouisa Brunt, 19, Royal Birkdale, LancashireIndia Clyburn, 21, Woodhall Spa, LincolnshireLily May Humphreys, 15, Stoke by Nayland, EssexAnnabell Fuller, 15, Roehampton, SurreySammy Fuller, 18, Roehampton, SurreyAlice Hewson, 20, Berkhamsted, HertfordshireSophie Lamb, 20, Clitheroe, LancashireGeorgia Price, 24, Bude & North CornwallBel Wardle, 18, Prestbury, CheshireGirls:Charlotte Heath, 16, Huddersfield, YorkshireThalia Kirby, 16, Harleyford, BuckinghamshireEbonie Lewis, 17, Knowle, GloucestershireMartha Lewis, 18, St George’s Hill, SurreyMimi Rhodes, 16, Burnham & Berrow, SomersetHannah Screen, 18, Berkhamsted, HertfordshireNicola Slater, 17, Woodsome Hall, YorkshireCaitlin Whitehead, 15, Kendal, CumbriaAmelia Williamson, 17, Royal Cromer, NorfolkImage copyright Leaderboard Photography Tags: Squads, Women 5 Feb 2018 New faces in England women and girls’ squads last_img read more