Crime prevention initiative for southside youth workers

first_imgEmail Advertisement WhatsApp Twitter Facebook YOUTH workers on Limerick’s southside were first in Ireland engage in a new crime prevention initiative which aims to educate young people about the dangers of gangs and weapon crime.Youth workers from Southill Area Centre, Roxboro Garda Youth Diversion, Southill School Completion Programme and Limerick Youth Service, were trained in the programme. Jennifer O’Brien, Southill Area Centre, brought the UK-based Streetwise programme to Limerick.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up It was developed in Leeds to combat gang crime.Jennifer said that although gang culture in the UK was different to here, much was applicable and will be rolled out in the Southill area.She said: “We invited all youth workers in Southill and the surrounding areas to participate. We wanted to challenge young people’s perception of what a gang is”.The programme uses an alternative approach to educating 10 to 21-year-olds about drugs, weapons and gangs by using powerful messages from former gang members.She added: “It highlights the negative impact of getting involved in gang crime and promotes positive alternatives”.Education packages provided include, ‘Bite the Bullet’, a weapons awareness programme, ‘Dealers’, a drugs education programme and ‘Doin Time,’ which deals with the consequences of going to prison.She stressed It was important that youth workers are educated about drugs and weapons, as it helps them to recognise the culture.Streetwise gets youth workers to explore the reasons why people join gangs.Jennifer explained: “Teenagers can often be oblivious to being a part of a gang as it is seen as normal for them, and they are just hanging around with their friends”.Those trained will now use art, music and role-playing to promote positive alternatives to gangs and crime.The programme also made the community workers aware of the different recruitment methods used.It uses a youth friendly design and connects to teenagers using modern language and references to hip hop.Some of the weapons used are highlighted, including swords, knuckle dusters and pool balls in socks.center_img Previous articleLimerick’s Niall Colgan appointed to national hairdressing ‘Style Council’Next articleShop, cook and eat smart admin Linkedin Print NewsLocal NewsCrime prevention initiative for southside youth workersBy admin – April 9, 2010 518 last_img read more

Limerick students shortlisted in Doodle 4 Google

first_imgNewsLocal NewsLimerick students shortlisted in Doodle 4 GoogleBy admin – February 18, 2013 665 Twitter Previous articleLIT students plan treats of All SortsNext articleWeekend Munster Rugby Fixtures admin Four Limerick students have been named as finalists in the fifth annual Doodle 4 Google competition. They are now amongst 75 Irish students in with a chance of having their doodle displayed on the Google Ireland homepage for millions of people to see. Everyone in Limerick is now being urged to visit www.google.ie/doodle4google and vote for Jordan, Siobhan, Emma and Patrick.The following students are among 75 regional finalists in with a chance of winning the competition:Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up ·        Jordan Kelly (Group 2) from Colaiste Mhichil, Sexton Street·        Siobhan Danaher (Group 4) from Colaiste Ide agus Iosef, Abbeyfeale·        Emma O’Connor (Group 4) from Colaiste Mhuire, Askeaton·        Patrick Moynihan (Group 5) from St. Clement’s College, South Circular RoadThe 75 finalists were selected by a panel of judges, including rugby player Robert Kearney, Gary Granville, Professor of Education at the National College of Art and Design and Marianne Kelly, former Assistant Curator at the Irish Museum of Modern Art.The finalists will now battle it out to top the public vote and to win the Doodle 4 Google title.Voting will close on the 4th of March. The five most popular doodles, one from each age category, will go forward to the final where one of Google’s professional doodlers will select the overall winner.John Herlihy, Head of Google Ireland, said, “This year we had the most entries that we’ve ever had, over 2,500, so our judging panel had an extremely tough time selecting the 75 finalists. Every one of our entrants should be tremendously proud of their success. Now, it’s over to the public to select our five class group winners. So I urge everyone in Limerick to go online, check out the fantastic creativity of our finalists and to vote for their favourite.”The five class group winners and their teachers will receive a Chromebook each. The overall winner will have their doodle shown on the Google Ireland homepage for a full day in April 2013. The winner’s school will also receive a €10,000 technology grant from Google and for the first time the winning student will receive a scholarship of €5,000 to go towards their college studies.For more information and to vote for the winning doodles go to: www.google.ie/doodle4google/ Facebook Advertisementcenter_img Linkedin Email Print WhatsApplast_img read more

Limerick students learn to finance their future

first_imgNewsEducationLimerick students learn to finance their futureBy Liam Togher – April 30, 2014 889 Changes to the Student Support Scheme for people living in Direct Provision Advertisement Print Twitter Previous articleLimerick’s latest prize bond millionaireNext articleLimerick people Keane to support guide dogs Liam Togherhttp://www.limerickpost.ieLiam joined the Limerick Post in December 2012, having previously worked in other local media organisations. He holds an MA in Journalism from the University of Limerick and is particularly interested in sports writing. Students in Limerick colleges to benefit from more than €1.5M funding to assist with online learning RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Limerick schools urged to get involved in STEM challenge STUDENTS from Laurel Hill Secondary School took part in a financial literacy programme under tuition from volunteers from Dell.‘Finance Your Future’ is a six-week programme sponsored by the Citi Foundation, with transition year students around Ireland learning about the importance of financial management, the importance of education and its role in improving potential earning power and using credit and cash wisely.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The programme began in 2012 and has educated more than 3,000 students nationwide in financial literacy modules. Volunteers from a variety of support organisations, including Dell, have delivered the lessons to students in a classroom setting.More than 90 Laurel Hill students enjoyed the programme taught to them by Dell volunteers Siobhan O’Connor, Stephen Martin and Fearghal Carroll, and career guidance counsellor Eithne Lyons said that the students took enormous benefit from ‘Finance Your Future’.“It is an excellent programme. The students learned through group work, interaction and activities – a perfect recipe.“Siobhan, Fearghal and Stephen are great role models for the students, giving them a real taste of life in the workplace and also how good financial decisions impact on their lives now and in the long term. We are grateful to both Citi and Dell for giving our students this opportunity.”center_img Linkedin Email Facebook TAGSCitiDELLeducationEithne LyonsFearghal CarrollfinanceFinance Your FutureLaurel Hill ColáisteSiobhan O’ConnorStephen Martin WhatsApp Education and Training Board serves up award winning standards Limerick social entrepreneurs honoured for their work in response to covid-19 Consultation process on a new action plan for apprenticeship launchedlast_img read more

Exhumation begins at Rathkeale as gardai investigate murder probe

first_imgWhatsApp Twitter Proceedures and appointments cancelled again at UHL Advertisement Previous articleVisitor numbers soar at eagles’ viewing pointNext articleNew support group for Limerick women experiencing separation Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Walk in Covid testing available in Limerick from Saturday 10th April NewsBreaking newsExhumation begins at Rathkeale as gardai investigate murder probeBy Staff Reporter – September 16, 2014 542 Linkedin Facebook Shannondoc operating but only by appointment center_img Surgeries and clinic cancellations extended RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Email Print No vaccines in Limerick yet TAGSfeatured Andrew Carey in [email protected] up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up THE exhumation of a woman found dead in her home over 20 years ago has begun at St Mary’s Burial ground in Rathkeale this Tuesday morning. Limerick woman Margot Seery was found dead in her apartment following a night out and at her inquest, it was found that she died of asphyxiation after choking. However, in a new development to the case, gardai and detectives attached to the cold case unit in Terenure were given new information into the possible circumstances surrounding the woman’s death. Following the granting of an application to the Minister for Justice earlier this summer seeking permission to exhume the body, more than a dozen gardai from the technical crime scene investigation unit and the cold case unit arrived shortly after 7am this Tuesday to begin the work of exhuming the remains of Ms Seery. A garda cordon was put in place at what has been deemed a crime scene as gravediggers started their work. The family plot at St Mary’s Burial ground also has the remains of Ms Seery’s parents as well as her late aunt. A second post mortem is expected to be carried out later at University Hospital Limerick as gardai further investigate this murder probe which is being led by Det Insp George McGeary West Limerick coroner Brendan Nix arrived on scene and said that he had “nothing but the height of praise for what is being done in these difficult circumstances”. More to follow. First Irish death from Coronavirus last_img read more

LYS to hold 40th anniversary celebration

first_imgLinkedin Limerick Youth Service have launched a new online live information chat service Print Keith Allen, Dylan Graham and Ryan O’Donoghue, who were part ofLimerick Youth Service’s 40th birthday celebrations.Keith Allen, Dylan Graham and Ryan O’Donoghue, who were part ofLimerick Youth Service’s 40th birthday celebrations.LIMERICK Youth Service is inviting past and present volunteers, participants and staff to a celebration evening at the Strand Hotel on Friday, September 26 at 7.30pm.The event marks the formal end to the popular youth organisation’s 40th anniversary celebrations. “Having supported Limerick’s youth for over four decades, we are sure there are some out there with amazing stories that we would like to hear,” said Catherine Kelly, CEO, Limerick Youth Service.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up “We would like to gather as much information as possible about people’s time with Limerick Youth Service and share it with the wider public. The evening is also our way of saying thank you for the support Limerick Youth Service has and continues to receive from the people of Limerick and beyond,’ added Ms Kelly.The evening will also feature the regional leg of Youth Work Ireland’s Volunteer Achievement Awards with local volunteers nominated in a number of categories.“The categories reflect the diversity of volunteering opportunities at Limerick Youth Service. From a Friday night youth club, to various committees or leading a band of merry men up Croagh Patrick, volunteers contribute their time and experience to our young people,” said Dermot Troy, Limerick Youth Service.Volunteers from this year’s local awards will be put forward for selection for Youth Work Ireland’s National Volunteer Achievement Awards to be held in Dublin in October.Anyone interested in attending the event can contact Dermot Troy at [email protected] Limerick Youth Service bakers create a special ‘Soviet Loaf’ Twitter Facebook TAGSLimerick Youth Service Limerick Youth Service Calling for Additional Investment in Youth Work Sector Advertisementcenter_img RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR NewsCommunityLYS to hold 40th anniversary celebrationBy John Keogh – September 12, 2014 848 Previous articleAutistic students put at riskNext articleMid West needs more start-ups John Keoghhttp://www.limerickpost.ie WhatsApp Young people graduate from Youth Employability Programme with Limerick Youth Service Email Nordic adventure for Northside teens Teenagers get on their bikes in search of new opportunitieslast_img read more

Violent undercurrent to Limerick City’s drug problem

first_img TAGSAlan JacquesAna Liffey Drug projectfeaturedheroinlimerickTony Duffin Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live Previous articleThis weeks #LimerickPostNext articleAAA called to account over Limerick street collections Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie Advertisement Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” Linkedin Twitter NewsLocal NewsViolent undercurrent to Limerick City’s drug problemBy Alan Jacques – February 12, 2015 1922 WhatsApp Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival center_img Print Vanishing Ireland podcast documenting interviews with people over 70’s, looking for volunteers to share their stories THE Ana Liffey Drug Project Mid-West have provided a positive response to substance abuse in the city through its ‘low threshold — harm reduction’ model since opening its doors in 2012. Limerick Post reporter Alan Jacques met with its outreach team who work with some of the city’s estimated 800 heroin users.Rachel Conway, Team Leader and Aoife Marshall, Project Worker with Mid-West Ana Liffey Drug Project. Picture: Don Moloney / Press 22WHILE the profile of heroin users around the country indicates that many become involved in drugs to cope with past traumas and hurts, a more disturbing picture has emerged on the streets of Limerick.At the height of Limerick’s gangland feud, one young man in a disadvantaged city estate made the “conscious decision” to start using heroin as an escape from the vicious cycle of violence in his community. He said he took heroin so as to be considered unreliable and escape pressure to be involved in gangland activity.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up “By using drugs, he would have been considered unreliable by these criminals and was then left alone and not bothered by the gangs. It would have been very difficult for young men in these areas to escape the feud. He thought he would probably get off heroin easily enough, but 10 years on he was still using,” Dawn Russell, Head of Services at Ana Liffey Drug Project told the Limerick Post.The Ana Liffey Drug Project was established as Ireland’s first ‘low threshold – harm reduction’ service during the height of the drugs epidemic that swept through Dublin’s North Inner City area in the early 1980s. The response to heroin use at the time was muddled at best and for those whose lives were being destroyed by substance abuse, the organisation founded by Jesuit priest Frank Brady must have seemed a ray of light in a time of dark despair.Since opening its doors in Limerick in May 2012, Ana Liffey has engaged with the most marginalised members of society and offered a hand of friendship to those who know little other than despair and chaos in their daily lives. The number using heroin in Limerick is estimated at about 800 and, since setting up in Limerick almost three years ago, Ana Liffey has engaged with 460 heroin users in the Mid-West, with all but about 20 of these located in the city.Based in the Fairgreen, the group operates in Limerick, Clare and North Tipperary, among people affected by problem substance abuse, their families and the wider community. Currently engaging with around 120 drug users locally, the organisation provides a range of services including assertive outreach, needle and syringe programme, medical services and assessment for residential treatment.The profile of drug users availing of Ana Liffey’s services nationwide is typically 70/30 in favour of men. However, in Limerick, Ana Liffey staff have noted these numbers balance out at 50/50 between the sexes.They have also noted that drug users in Limerick report issues, seemingly unique to the city.Where many drug addicts report violence and abuse in their past, in Limerick, people presenting to the Ana Liffey claim that this threat of violence and abuse is ongoing for them.“Compared to other regions in the country, we get much higher reports of physical attacks in Limerick. Drug users here are facing that threat of violence every day — it’s imminent,” said Ms Russell.“Be it domestic abuse, sexual abuse, violence, intimidation or family feuds, we have seen a trend in Limerick where substance users are particularly vulnerable. We’ve also heard horror stories from women in Limerick about men, often much older men, who appear to be kind and offer to take them in and give them a bed for the night, only later for these women to be opportunistically attacked or abused. It’s a hellish and chaotic existence,” she added.Director of the Ana Liffey Drug Project, Tony Duffin, agrees that the profile of its clients in the Mid-West region distinguishes it from other areas.Director of Ana Liffey Drug Project, Tony Duffin“Many of the women who access our services in the Mid-West report that they are victims of significant levels of abuse. Often they do not wish to report their experiences to the Gardaí for fear of reprisal from the alleged perpetrators or their associates — either immediately after reporting or in the years to come,” Mr Duffin explains.The situation for men in the region is also concerning, and they too often report being victims of violence.Mr Duffin said that the fear associated with violence could impact on the individual’s ability to make positive choices.“This is highlighted by the experience of the young man who reported to us that he made a conscious decision to take heroin so that he would be considered unreliable and untrustworthy. In this way, he hoped to escape the pressure he was coming under to be involved in organised crime,” he commented.While the levels of violence reported to the Ana Liffey in Limerick are high compared to other parts of the country, the other issues people experience are similar to those in other areas.“Both men and women are often homeless as well as using drugs problematically. The lasting solutions to these problems are appropriate housing with support, provided on a ‘housing first’ basis, and timely access to suitable treatment and rehabilitation,” Mr Duffin stated.But there’s a distinct lack of options in these areas.“Ultimately, Ireland has limited resources to deal with problem drug use and associated issues. Both nationally and locally, we need to target the resources we have towards evidence informed interventions that reduces the harm drug use causes to individuals, families and communities in cost effective ways.”Most of Ana Liffey’s clients are between 20 and 30 years old and also tend to present as poly-drug users. Funded predominantly by the State, Ana Liffey does not charge for any of its addiction services and team members emphasise the importance of treating its clients with “respect and dignity”.“A lot of the time we are the first to engage and have a real conversation with people. Drugs are a big part of their identity and they tend to isolate themselves, as they have not had very many positive experiences. They are very vulnerable and live totally chaotic and traumatic lives,” said Ana Liffey’s Team Leader in Limerick, Rachel Conway.A direct link has emerged in the city in the last couple of years between young people abusing benzodiazepines, known as ‘benzos’ and ‘upjohns’, and the increase of heroin use. ‘Benzos’ includes drugs such as Xanax and Valium and their more dangerous street versions such as ‘stick’.Ana Liffey have also seen evidence of Limerick drug users taking Lyrica, a prescription drug for controlling seizures and treating nerve pain.“I was on Xanax, I was on more than I should have been. I was out of my head going out doing very stupid things and then I started dabbling with heroin. My mother died three years ago and I got on Xanax first and then I went completely off the rails and pushed everyone that was near to me away,” 22-year-old Ana Liffey service user Carol (not her real name) told the Limerick Post.“I just constantly wanted to be stoned and live in a different world. I’d take anything at all just to take away that reality. My mother and her partner were heroin addicts so I had seen it from a very young age. I knew all about it and I swore I’d never go down that path, but you don’t know what’s in front of you. I had witnessed my mother on heroin since I was around seven or eight up till 18 when she died,” the young woman admits.Research undertaken by homelessness agency Novas Initiatives, revealed that in an 18-month period between May 2012 and November 2013, they responded to 34 overdoses — an average of one incident every two weeks. The first study of its kind in Ireland, it confirmed that benzodiazepines and heroin were the drugs most frequently used by those interviewed in Limerick, with one-fifth injecting daily.This week the Limerick Post joined Ana Liffey Mid-West’s outreach team in the city centre as they set out to provide clean needles and syringes to drug users; a health promotion intervention grounded in the organisation’s harm reduction philosophy.Team Leader Rachel Conway and Project Worker Aoife Marshall both carried plastic bags filled with injecting equipment and other drug paraphernalia such as needles, syringes, water, pots, bins and Vitamin C, available at no cost to those who might need it. The Mid-West outreach team also offers a wide range of advice and support regarding safer drug use and safer injecting techniques, tailored to the drug users needs. The aim of this service is to reduce the damage associated with sharing used injecting equipment.“This all helps the wider community,” Rachel explains.“You can’t just tell them to give up drugs altogether because they are not ready for that. We engage with them and if we get them to trust us, that’s a big thing. We work with them to find a way to be able to look after themselves and keep them safe by not overdosing,” she said.Ana Liffey Drug Project Mid-West team leader Rachel ConwayOne drug user we met begging on Denmark Street is freezing cold so the outreach team buys him a warm coffee and engages him in even warmer conversation to gage his wellbeing. This human interaction manages to bring a smile to the young man’s face and the team moves on happy in the knowledge that he has no pressing health issues.“It’s quiet today. Sometimes they come into town early, get their money and disappear then to buy their drugs,” Rachel points out.Set up as an alternative to the ‘just say no’ abstinence-based approach of the eighties, Ana Liffey works on the frontline engaging and supporting those who’ve slipped off the radar. The organisation’s work brings about positive change in the lives of substance users in a non-judgmental environment.For 22-year-old drug user Carol, this model has made a positive difference.“I made lovely friends here and the support is brilliant. They go out of their way to get you here. They give you help and I want to thank them because they are a very good group of people. God only know where half of us would be without them,” she says.As I depart the Ana Liffey Mid-West team on the city’s streets, the words of Dr Seuss spring into mind: “Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It’s not.”For more details on Ana Liffey Drug Project log on to www.aldp.ie or call their Freephone number 1800 78 68 28. Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Email WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Facebooklast_img read more

Artists invited to apply for studios

first_imgPrint NewsBreaking newsArtists invited to apply for studiosBy John Keogh – May 29, 2015 647 Advertisement Linkedin Picture: Gareth WilliamsTHE Limerick Arts Office has announced an open call to recognised artists to apply for the use of two artists’ studios at James Street in Limerick City and in Cappamore.Interested artists can submit their applications up until 5pm on June 17 with a current CV, application form, a typed cover letter including the proposed use of the studio or gallery/workshop space and accompanying documentation.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Those intending to apply to both studios are asked to submit two separate applications. Applications should be made to the Limerick Arts Office, Limerick City & County Council, Merchant’s Quay, Limerick, or by email [email protected] WhatsAppcenter_img Facebook Twitter Email Previous articleCycle to support school for the deafNext articleCouple jump to safety from burning house John Keoghhttp://www.limerickpost.ielast_img read more

Crowdfunding campaign for Limerick filmmaker’s New York ‘Narcan’ venture

first_img Previous articleLimerick student’s design wins Dyson awardNext articleBig turnout for Cliona’s Foundation cycle Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie Email NewsLocal NewsCrowdfunding campaign for Limerick filmmaker’s New York ‘Narcan’ ventureBy Alan Jacques – September 4, 2015 691 Vanishing Ireland podcast documenting interviews with people over 70’s, looking for volunteers to share their stories Facebook Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live TAGSlimerickMalachy McCourtNarcannew yorkPeter McNamara WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Advertisement by Alan [email protected] up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up AN online crowdfunding campaign is underway to help complete production of a short film by Limerick director Peter McNamara.Inspired by his time living and working in New York, ‘Narcan’ tells the story of Sean Ryan, an Irish paramedic working the unsympathetic streets of the ‘Big Apple’.The cast includes Malachy McCourt and Limerick actor Peter Halpin, who played the writer and actor in ‘Angela’s Ashes’, which was based on the life of his older brother, Pulitzer prize winning author Frank McCourt.The story unfolds as the film’s central character, Sean, toils to manage a fractured personal life. His only son refuses to speak to him and the void between himself and his wife Sinead, grows larger with every passing day. During the course of a 12-hour shift, life-changing decisions with irrevocable consequences must be made.According to Peter McNamara, ‘Narcan’ is a film about family separation and how it’s become a commonplace in society.” I wanted to capture a glimpse inside a very stressful job and, as the film plays out, Sean’s psychological state is tested as he stretches the moral boundaries,” he explains.“For months, we prepared and analyzed the script multiple times, we needed every character to be recognizable and I think you’ll find elements of yourself in each and every one of them.”After assembling a small crew of 15, cameras rolled inside the locker room of one of New York’s busiest emergency stations and so began the rollercoaster ride shooting of ‘Narcan’.“All members of the cast and crew were pushed to the limit and sometimes beyond, all in the name of art. Everybody shared my vision and worked tirelessly to bring it to life. I’m so proud of each and everyone who was part of the ‘Narcan’ team.“It was a life changing experience and now I know that New York is where I want to be based making beautiful films for the foreseeable future,” he told the Limerick Post.Co-funded with Soberanis Productions, a crowdfunding campaign has been kick-started to complete the film. For more details see https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/narcan-short-movie#/center_img Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Print Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Linkedinlast_img read more

Countdown on to one of Limerick’s most high-powered business conferences

first_img Previous articleLimerick people urged to help make cruelty to animals historyNext articleLimerick business women in hunt for coveted awards Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie LEADING business journalist, broadcaster and author Richard Curran is set to add further weight to one of Limerick’s most significant business conferences to date as he chairs next week’s International Cluster Conference at the Strand Hotel.The annual conference – titled ‘Clusters as Drivers of Competitiveness’ – will be held outside Switzerland for the first time when it takes place at the Strand Hotel on Wednesday and Thursday next (September 30 and October 1).Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up It will give key stakeholders, from public and semi-state sector representatives to academics, an understanding of the benefits that formal business clusters are delivering globally and what’s required to establish them here in Ireland.Among the key speakers at the event will be one of the world’s leading authorities on clusters, Dr Christian Ketels, of Harvard Business School as well as a host of other leading European and Irish experts on clusters and competitiveness.Speaking ahead of the event, Dr Pat Daly, Head of Economic Development and Planning at Limerick City and County Council said that the gathering will be a think tank around how Ireland can develop clusters and, in doing so, help drive competitiveness and innovation for companies involved in the clusters.“Formal clusters exist across the world but are particularly strong in the likes of Germany, Switzerland and the US and the hosting of this international conference here next week is very much going to put developing clusters here on the agenda. There’s a lot we need to do but what we do already know is that regions with clusters outperform those that don’t.“Having Richard Curran on board to Chair the event is a great fit also. His RTE documentary, the Battle for Rural Ireland, kick started a debate on balanced regional development and international experience is that clusters can help address regional imbalances by driving growth, competitiveness and innovation.” Email Print Twitter Advertisementcenter_img WhatsApp Linkedin BusinessNewsCountdown on to one of Limerick’s most high-powered business conferencesBy Staff Reporter – September 23, 2015 631 Facebooklast_img read more

LIT study highlights student experience of sexual aggression

first_img Previous articleNew phase of Wild Atlantic Way to include LimerickNext articleOpinion – World in Union #RWC2015 Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Advertisement Linkedin WhatsApp Andrew [email protected] up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up ONE in every four students have experienced unwanted and aggressive sexual behaviour, including groping, sexualised verbal abuse and unwanted sexual contact, according to a study conducted at a Limerick third level college.Limerick Institute of Technology (LIT) research collective, Social Science ConneXions, has found that up to 25 per cent of students surveyed earlier this year reported having experienced a “sexually unwanted or aggressive incident”.The survey was conducted online across all four LIT campuses. 338 responses were received and the key findings also showed that five per cent had experienced a non-consensual sexual encounter and five per cent of male respondents had experienced a sexually unwanted or aggressive incident.Karen Sugrue, Sociology lecturer and researcher with Social Science ConneXions said that while there was an enormous amount of evidence that students were particularly vulnerable to sexual assault and unwanted sexual behaviour, they wanted to find out if this was also the case for LIT students.“We’re delighted with the response from the management team at LIT who have taken the issue extremely seriously”, she added.LIT lecturer Jennifer Moran Stritch, who is director of the Loss and Grief research group, said that some people believed that the only type of sexual assault is rape.“We are also aware of the importance of verbal abuse, atmosphere and the sense of feeling intimidated. We want our students to live and study in an environment where they feel safe and know how and where to access supports should they need them”.Mairead Keogh, Vice President of LIT Students Union said that prevention of unwanted or aggressive incidents was the key to ensuring a safer environment for students and the students union strongly support the measures implemented.LIT Registrar Terry Twomey said that LIT had an exemplary record in student safety on campus.“We have had no reported incidents here at LIT, and we take pre-emptive action through our Student Safety Programme to ensure that we maintain our exemplary record. Nonetheless, as part of LIT’s Student Safety Programme, our Social Science Connexions unit carried out a small pilot survey of students on any experience of sexual harassment they might have had”.He added that because LIT had no reported incidents, the negative experiences reported most likely related to life off-campus.“Still, the institute is taking no chances. Last week, LIT introduced a new presentation on consent to all new students as part of our Student Safety Programme. LIT is leading the sector in this way and our objective is to maintain our exemplary record of student safety,” he concluded.National research indicates that only about 1 in 10 incidents are reported. To address this and support students, LIT ran a programme of discussion about consent during September induction days for 1st year students that ties in with the No Grey Areas campaign launched nationally by Minister for Justice Equality and Law Reform, Francis Fitzgerald, last Friday. Emailcenter_img Print Twitter Facebook NewsLIT study highlights student experience of sexual aggressionBy Staff Reporter – September 24, 2015 1100 last_img read more