Mitchell targets World Cup return – with video

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS “I’ll make sure that whatever day-to-day rehab stuff is required, I will do. It will be tedious and boring, but if that tedious and boring work is going to put me in a position to hopefully be looked at for World Cup selection, it will be worth it. BRISBANE, AUSTRALIA – APRIL 23: Drew Mitchell of the Waratahs injures his leg during the round 10 Super Rugby match between the Reds and the Waratahs at Suncorp Stadium on April 23, 2011 in Brisbane, Australia. (Photo by Bradley Kanaris/Getty Images) Tough break: Drew Mitchell goes down in pain against the Reds, but hopes to be fit for the World CupDREW MITCHELL is aiming to return from injury in time from the World Cup.The Australia wing dislocated his ankle and broke a bone in his leg while playing for the Waratahs in a Super Rugby match against the Reds at the weekend, and the initial prognosis ruled him out for around six months. That meant playing at New Zealand 2011 this autumn was out of the question.However, after consulting with his doctors the 27-year-old now believes he can recover in three months – and has set his sights on making the Wallabies’ World Cup squad.“The indication I got is 12 to 14 weeks – it’s much better news than it could have been,” Mitchell said. “If I’d been looking at the World Cup as not being an option at all, sometimes the motivation might not have been as high as it could be. “I was immediately trying to work out how many weeks it would be before I could possibly return. It has put me in a better place than what it could have. Also, ever since the last World Cup when we were eliminated in the quarter-finals (by England), from that moment I have done everything I can to get back for the next World Cup.”Mitchell will be hoping that there are no setbacks with his recovery so he is fit enough to play some part in the last three rounds of the Tri-Nations. If not, he may have to rely on playing club rugby in Sydney to push his World Cup claims.last_img read more

Lions 2013: The squad meet for the first time

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS First day at school: The class of 2013 try to break out of their cliques. Matt Stevens seems to be succeeding so far!By Alan DymockYESTERDAY, AMONGST the luxurious trappings of the Syon Park in the west of London, the 2013 British and Irish Lions had their first meeting.Like lucky competition winners 36 of the 37 tourists queued up for their issues of stash, expecting kilos of kit and flip flops. Only a niggle-pestered Brian O’Driscoll was left with the medical staff at Leinster following the close-fought RaboDirect Pro12 semi against Glasgow Warriors at the weekend.Northampton Saints and England hooker Dylan Hartley tweeted that it was like the first day of school, and it’s easy to see why.Lion cub: Bil and his carer, HoggBoys were measured throughout the day for their new uniforms. The youngest tourist, Stuart Hogg, was given tour mascot Bil the Lion to nurture and protect. The two stand-offs Jonny Sexton and Owen Farrell were called to the headmaster’s office to talk tactics for an hour. People were expected to make friends quickly.There is not much turnaround. The squad leave for Hong Kong on May 27, and the stragglers who are playing in Aviva Premiership and Pro12 finals will join up the day before. That means that 22 of the 37 will be with Warren Gatland and his backroom staff for the week before departure.It is an inconvenient time. The finals have to be negotiated, but with the schedule for the Lions tour previously hammered out between the Lions and the ARU it is a case of having to make do with the time allocated. This is a professional tour. In 1966 the Lions took on a coach for the first time and despite their amateur status dedicated two weeks in Bournemouth to prepare for their trip to New Zealand.After the last amateur tour, the New Zealand tour of 1993, coach Ian McGeechan said in a report: “I felt it was important that we had an additional weekend together, but this was very dificult to organise because of club commitments… It seems ridiculous to me that we were finally at the mercy of the clubs as to how could organise preperation.” The master knew then and built into the next trip.The first professional tour, the 1997 series victory over South Africa, was one where ample time was given up for days of team-building and a night, two days before they flew south, where everyone was encouraged to wire into some free beer.That new-age management approach has become a parody of itself in recent years, of course, with the David Brent-style enforcement of motivational speeches and collage painting being mixed with hard graft in 2001 and 2005. The Graham Henry tour of Australia in ’01 was notable for a few weeks of physical training before they played Western Australia and in 2005 many were very open about their lack of appreciation for Sir Clive Woodward’s arts and crafts time during a week at the Vale of Glamorgan Hotel.Lions assemble: Sam Warburton and Geoff ParlingThese are examples of how it is to be done and also how not to do it, by scheduling too much like kindergarten teachers with ADHD. Mind you, Gatland is shrewd and was present in 2009 when the squad mixed a week or so of prep at Pennyhill Park with meeting up for drinks and singing before they left for South Africa. He knows to treat his tourists like adults and while he may not get as much training time with every player as he would like – indeed the farcical turnaround for the players in finals is a tough one to budget for – but they must make the best of what they can.In the next few weeks bonds can be forged that hold the tour together. LONDON, ENGLAND – MAY 13: Lions players walk to venue to have their squad photograph during the British and Irish Lions media day at Syon Park on May 13, 2013 in London, England. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images)last_img read more

Minis: How to play golden boot

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS IT’S A natural urge for young boys to put boot to ball, so indulge them by letting them play golden boot! It’s an excellent way for players to improve their kicking skills, and they love the competitive element. This game tests their ability to kick conversions, drop goals, punt, grubber and kick to touch. For added fun, finish off with a crossbar challenge. To learn the rules of the game, download the PDF here and take it to training!last_img

England reach Autumn Nations Cup final by beating Wales

first_img England reach Autumn Nations Cup final by beating WalesEngland beat Wales 24-13 at Parc y Scarlets to top Group A and reach the Autumn Nations Cup final.It was not the one-way traffic many expected this match in Llanelli to be given the relative form of the two sides, but in the end Eddie Jones’s team were comfortable victors – even if Wales took an early lead.Johnny Williams scored the first try against the run of play in the tenth minute. Henry Slade looked to kick downfield but the ball ricocheted off Dan Biggar’s hand, the Wales fly-half kicked ahead and Williams chased hard to touch down the ball first.It was reviewed by the TMO to determine whether it was a knock-on by Biggar but because it was a kick from Slade it was considered a chargedown. You can watch the try here… A 24-13 win for Eddie Jones’s team at Parc y Scarlets means they top Group A  They conceded three times as many penalties as England – six to two – in the first 40 and Owen Farrell slotted two of them to give the visitors an 11-7 half-time lead.Mako Vunipola extended that advantage with only his second Test try – and first since 2014 – in the 50th minute.England put pressure on Wales from a five-metre scrum with a series of pick-and-goes, and their patience paid off when Vunipola pirouetted out of a tackle to get over the line. England dominated possession and territory in the opening period – Wales made twice as many tackles (73) to England (36) –  and it was the hosts’ penalty count that proved costly. Prop star: Mako Vunipola scored England’s second try against Wales (Getty Images) England’s ill-discipline allowed Wales to get back into the game, two offside penalties slotted by Biggar to make it 13-18 after an hour.Momentum swung back towards England in the final 20, though, as Farrell kicked another two penalties – and reached a points milestone.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS England hit back a few minutes later.After an initial burst by Man of the Match Sam Underhill, the ball was recycled, spread wide and Slade went over… England will now play in the Autumn Nations Cup final against France next Sunday, 6 December – and there will be 2,000 fans in attendance at Twickenham given the change in Government rules from next week. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

England Autumn Nations Cup Squad 2020 – Team to play France

first_img Breakdown master: Wasps back-rower Jack Willis in England training (Getty Images) Backs Joe CokanasigaElliot DalyOwen FarrellGeorge FurbankJonathan JosephOllie LawrenceMax MalinsJoe MarchantJonny MayAlex MitchellDan RobsonHenry SladeOllie ThorleyJacob UmagaBen YoungsEngland Autumn Nations Cup Fixtures 2020Dates, kick-off times and TV details for England’s four Autumn Nations Cup matches…Round OneSaturday 14 Nov, England 40-0 Georgia Related: Jamie George first England hooker to score a hat-trickRound TwoSaturday 21 Nov, England 18-7 Ireland Related: Jonny May scores first-half braceRound ThreeSaturday 28 Nov, Wales 13-24 England Related: England reach Autumn Nations Cup finalFinals WeekendSunday 6 Dec, England 22-19 France (AET) Related: England beat France in extra-time to lift Autumn Nations CupHead here for the full Autumn Nations Cup fixtures list. Who has Eddie Jones selected for the four matches in November and December? LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img England Autumn Nations Cup Squad 2020After winning a third Six Nations title in five years, Eddie Jones’s England have now switched focus to the Autumn Nations Cup, which runs from 13 November to 6 December.England beat Georgia, Ireland and Wales in their group to reach the final against France, which will be played at Twickenham.Jones has made one change to the starting team that won in Llanelli, with Anthony Watson coming in for the injured Jonathan Joseph.England Team to Play France – Sunday 6 DecemberElliot Daly; Anthony Watson, Henry Slade, Owen Farrell (captain), Jonny May; George Ford, Ben Youngs; Mako Vunipola, Jamie George, Kyle Sinckler, Maro Itoje, Joe Launchbury, Tom Curry, Sam Underhill, Billy Vunipola.Replacements: Luke Cowan-Dickie, Ellis Genge, Will Stuart, Jonny Hill, Ben Earl, Dan Robson, Max Malins, Joe Marchant.England Team to Play Wales – Saturday 28 NovemberElliot Daly; Jonathan Joseph, Henry Slade, Owen Farrell (captain), Jonny May; George Ford, Ben Youngs; Mako Vunipola, Jamie George, Kyle Sinckler, Maro Itoje, Joe Launchbury, Tom Curry, Sam Underhill, Billy Vunipola.Replacements: Luke Cowan-Dickie, Ellis Genge, Will Stuart, Jonny Hill, Ben Earl, Jack Willis, Dan Robson, Anthony Watson.England Team to Play Ireland – Saturday 21 NovemberElliot Daly; Jonathan Joseph, Ollie Lawrence, Henry Slade, Jonny May; Owen Farrell (captain), Ben Youngs; Mako Vunipola, Jamie George, Kyle Sinckler, Maro Itoje, Joe Launchbury, Tom Curry, Sam Underhill, Billy Vunipola.Replacements: Tom Dunn, Ellis Genge, Will Stuart, Jonny Hill, Ben Earl, Dan Robson, George Ford, Max Malins.England Team to Play Georgia – Saturday 14 NovemberElliot Daly; Jonathan Joseph, Ollie Lawrence, Henry Slade, Jonny May; Owen Farrell (captain), Ben Youngs; Ellis Genge, Jamie George, Will Stuart, Joe Launchbury, Charlie Ewels, Maro Itoje, Jack Willis, Billy Vunipola.Replacements: Tom Dunn, Mako Vunipola, Kyle Sinckler, Ben Earl, Tom Curry, Dan Robson, Max Malins, Joe Marchant.England Autumn Nations Cup Squad 2020ForwardsTom CurryTom DunnBen EarlCharlie EwelsEllis GengeJamie GeorgeJonny HillTed HillMaro ItojeJoe LaunchburyLewis LudlamJoe MarlerBeno ObanoDavid RibbansKyle SincklerWill StuartSam UnderhillBilly VunipolaMako VunipolaHarry WilliamsJack Willis Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Zimbabwe: Victory for Manicaland in long-awaited judgment

first_img The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Anglican Communion Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Jobs & Calls In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Africa, Rector Albany, NY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME By Bellah ZuluPosted Feb 27, 2013 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Events Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Tags Submit a Job Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA [Anglican Communion News Service] The Supreme Court of Zimbabwe has ruled in favor of the Anglican Church of the Province of Central Africa (CPCA) in a legal case involving the province and breakaway former bishop of the Anglican Diocese of Manicaland Elson Jakazi.“We are glad to share with you the good news that the long-awaited judgment is out and it is in our favor,” the Rev. Luke Chigwanda, diocesan secretary, told ACNS. “Thank you for your prayers, and may you please continue to pray for us as we get into the last phase of moving into our properties. Pray especially for the bishop as he does the paperwork to facilitate evictions.”In 2007, Jakazi and his supporters broke away from the province and took over the cathedral, churches and many other church properties. But a final ruling by the Supreme Court confirmed that Jakazi and his supporters had withdrawn from the church “in their individual capacities.”It added, “The diocese could not be withdrawn by the applicants [Jakazi and supporters] from its first respondents [CPCA].”Bishop of Manicaland Julius Makoni said he was very happy with the outcome.“The Supreme Court’s judgment in our favor brings an end to uncertainty in the diocese. Now we know where we stand and can start the process of rebuilding the properties,” he said.The diocese’s experience was “difficult and excruciating but, being a people of faith, we knew there was a purpose in all this and knew there was light at the end of the tunnel,” he said. “We knew that God would not abandon us and that we would win at the end of the day.”In November 2012, the Anglican Diocese of Harare also won a long-running legal battle with excommunicated former bishop Dr. Nolbert Kunonga when the Supreme Court of Zimbabwe ruled that CPCA was the lawful owner of all diocesan church properties.Reacting to the most recent ruling, CPCA Archbishop Albert Chama said the battle in Manicaland had “been a long, rough road, but it’s a joy to the province since, in the end, we have seen the victory and justice has finally been done.”“The victory brings a different dimension to the faith and the missions of the church,” he added. “People never had the freedom to worship and yet the church continued to grow.”Makoni said he appreciated the support given by the rest of the Anglican Church.“The Anglican Communion cares. One part was suffering, but the amount of support that we got was amazing,” he said. “We maybe small, but we were never left alone by the communion.”“We should be gracious in victory,” he added. “We should not gloat and should stay focused because we have learnt through hope and faith that there is victory at the end.“We should now look with compassion on our brothers on the other side and let them know we are the light and they should come and join us.” Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Bath, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Zimbabwe: Victory for Manicaland in long-awaited judgment Anglican province regains properties from breakaway bishop, followers Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Collierville, TN Press Release Service Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Cathedral Dean Boise, ID TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Press Release Rector Belleville, IL Rector Knoxville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, ORlast_img read more

Canada: Challenge causes and consequences of poverty

first_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC PWRDF’s Adele Finney and CWLR’s Robert Granke tell members of Joint Assembly about the work of their agencies. Photo: Art Babych, Anglican Journal[Anglican Journal] Members of Joint Assembly were offered insight into the work of the Anglican Primate’s World Relief and Development Fund and the Canadian Lutheran World Relief when Michael Pryse, Lutheran bishop of the Eastern Synod, interviewed PWRDF executive director Adele Finney and CLWR executive director Robert Granke.Pryse asked both to describe what they do in their work and on behalf of Canadian Lutherans and Anglicans. Granke said his work starts with CLWR’s mission, “which is to challenge the causes and consequences of poverty.” That mission is also part of the mission of the church to serve in the name of Christ, he said. “CLWR provides an opportunity to do that and enable people of faith to be able to serve and respond to global needs in a collective way.”Finney said that PWRDF works toward “a truly just, healthy and peaceful world. We focused in on food security, preventive health and microfinance.” A question Finney says she often asks is, “How does what we plan to do support vulnerable people to become agents of change in their own lives and in their communities’ lives?” She pointed to the example of PWRDF’s partnership with a group of refugees who fled to India from Sri Lanka. Some have been in India now for 30 years, but from the beginning they focused on education, learning peace-making skills that would help them build a future. They also began production of a nutritional supplement, spirulina, and now they train others.Granke spoke of  a visit to a community in Ethiopia that CLWR had supported 30 years ago, assisting with irrigation, potable water and training for farmers. “To walk into this community and see what is basically an oasis in the middle of what is basically a desert in Eastern Ethiopia and to see that this community is thriving 30 years later…was really gratifying.”Looking to the future, Granke said CLWR is facing a real challenge because its funding from the Canadian government ends this year. CIDA is now being absorbed into the department of foreign affairs and trade, and Granke said NGOs are monitoring the situation, hoping that the focus on humanitarian aid will not be diminished in favour of trade interests.“There are no opportunities at this moment for us to seek additional funding from CIDA, from the historical sources, so we’re having to be creative and look at ways in which we can draw other resources in the future.”CIDA, in fact, is being integrated into the department of foreign affairs and international trade.  “We as a faith-based community and as NGOs in Canada are taking steps to monitor this. One of the key issues for us is to ensure that the integrity of the official development assistance act that Canada has had for many years is kept intact and that the focus is on humanitarian assistance…The risk is that more of this will go to serve our own agenda, which is more trade focused.” Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Job Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA By Leigh Anne WilliamsPosted Jul 8, 2013 Rector Albany, NY Anglican Communion, The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Press Release Featured Events AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Tags Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT center_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Bath, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Martinsville, VA Press Release Service Canada Joint Assembly, Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Featured Jobs & Calls Canada: Challenge causes and consequences of poverty Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Ecumenical & Interreligious Rector Smithfield, NC Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LAlast_img read more

Video: Remembering Jonathan Daniels

first_imgVideo: Remembering Jonathan Daniels Rector Albany, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Tags Rector Tampa, FL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Video Rector Bath, NC Rector Smithfield, NC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem [Episcopal News Service] As the United States faces anew the racial tensions that divide the country, Episcopalians and others are reflecting on the sacrifice of Jonathan Daniels who was martyred 50 years ago this month during his time working for civil rights. Daniels, 26, died from a nearly point-blank shotgun blast fired by a Lowndes County, Alabama, employee on Aug. 20, 1965. In dying, Daniels saved 17-year-old Ruby Sales when he pulled her from in front of him. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Events Submit a Press Release Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Jobs & Calls Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis center_img Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Aug 13, 2015 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Belleville, IL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit an Event Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Press Release Service Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Jonathan Daniels, In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Martinsville, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Washington, DC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TNlast_img read more

Music camp connects Six Nations’ youth with heritage

first_img Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Shreveport, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Music camp connects Six Nations’ youth with heritage Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Anglican Communion, Youth & Young Adults Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Events Press Release Service Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Press Release Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME center_img Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Martinsville, VA By Ben Graves Posted Aug 18, 2015 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Bath, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Tags Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Campers and volunteer leaders at the second Music for the Spirit summer camp in Ohsweken, Six Nations. Photo: Richelle Miller[Anglican Journal] The village of Ohsweken in Six Nations of the Grand River, Ont., recently played host to the second Music for the Spirit summer day camp, which three Anglican Church of Canada agencies co-sponsored with other faith groups and charitable organizations.The nine-day camp, held July 2-10, was geared toward youth ages nine through 14, and was aimed at “creating friendships, joy, and laughter through music.”It was also meant to explore “life promotion strategies” by “building the self-esteem of young people,” teaching “respect and acceptance for oneself and others,” and providing “a creative outlet for the expression of emotions,” according to a grant proposal submitted to the Anglican Healing Fund by the Rev. Norman Casey, of the Anglican Parish of the Six Nations. (A grant from the Anglican Healing Fund, in combination with a 2014 donation from the Dreamcatcher Charitable Foundation, provided for the bulk of the camp’s inventory of guitars and keyboards.)The camp was free to the public, and had a full complement of 27 participants, just over half of whom were returnees from the previous year. Eighteen adult and young adult volunteers from the local Six Nations community donated their time and energy as camp leaders in order to make it a reality.Campers had the opportunity to gain experience on a number of different instruments, including guitar, violin, and keyboard. The guitar played an especially prominent role, due largely to its historic “affinity with the Six Nations community,” said an evaluative report co-authored by Scott Knarr, camp director, Richelle Miller, camp media and advertising co-ordinator, and the Rev. Casey.Participants were able to explore and connect to parts of their cultural heritage as camp leaders guided them through the making of traditional hand drums, water drums, and cow horn rattles—which they were free to take with them at the end of camp. Four Mohawk-language singing mentors were also on hand to teach campers traditional singing methods of the Six Nations; one participant discovered a hitherto unknown passion for traditional dance during these lessons. Several campers had the chance to share what they had learned with the wider Six Nations community on a trip to the local Iroquois Lodge seniors’ residence, where they performed a selection of songs accompanied by guitar and violin.The majority of the camp took place in the Six Nations Community Hall, a space the report described as “a joy from which to make music.” The Six Nations Elected Council waived the operation and maintenance fees for the camp’s duration as a gesture of support and an acknowledgment of the importance of Music for the Spirit for Six Nations youth. The hall also served as the site of the camp’s closing concert, which was well attended by participants’ families and members of the Six Nations community.Faithlife Financial, Mount Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church in Waterloo, the Anglican Council of Indigenous Peoples (ACIP) and the Anglican Church of Canada’s Indigenous ministries also contributed to the camp. The latter two were particularly helpful in securing the presence of several traditional Indigenous music instructors, who made the trip from Alaska to teach at the camp for a second year, said organizers. A donation from a local member of the Anglican Parish of the Six Nations helped cover the cost of the meals and snacks for the campers. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Job Listing Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA last_img read more

Compañeros visitan y expresan su solidaridad con episcopales ecuatorianos

first_imgCompañeros visitan y expresan su solidaridad con episcopales ecuatorianos La recuperación física y emocional del terremoto puede tardar años Por Lynette Wilson Posted Jun 17, 2016 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Press Release Youth Minister Lorton, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Tags Rector Belleville, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Press Release Service Submit an Event Listing Curate Diocese of Nebraska Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ [Episcopal News Service – Manta, Ecuador] Los pobres, las mujeres y los niños son los que más sufren las secuelas de un desastre. En Ecuador, donde un enorme terremoto mató a más de 650 personas y desplazó a más de 30.000 en abril, las mujeres y los niños, además del trauma, el pesar y las heridas emocionales sufridas, han experimentado aumentos en las tasas de violencia doméstica y el hambre ha provocado un aumento de enfermedades gastrointestinales y respiratorias en los niños.Esta realidad que trajo las secuelas del terremoto no hace titulares ni se presta a las fotografías, pero los vicarios que atienden aquí cuatro misiones de la Diócesis de Ecuador Litoral la confrontan a diario en sus comunidades. Además, es una realidad que durante cuatro días, del 9 al 12 de junio, la aprendieron de primera mano representantes de cuatro iglesias compañeras de la Diócesis de Tennessee.Durante una reunión informal en la misión de San José Obrero, el Rdo. José Cantos Delgado, diácono encargado, describió la situación. La iglesia, que sufrió daños estructurales menores, está localizada en el 15 de Abril, un cantón donde viven “los más pobres de los pobres” y donde los ocupantes ilegales, comunes en América latina, han construido estructuras de bambú, ladrillo y contrachapado detrás de la iglesia.“Ecuador tiene uno de los índices más elevados de abuso infantil en Sudamérica”, dijo Cantos, añadiendo que el terremoto y las tensiones que se le asocian, inseguridad alimentaria y pérdidas de empleos, han dado lugar a un aumento de la violencia doméstica en que las mujeres intentan proteger a sus hijos y protegerse ellas mismas.San José Obrero dirige una guardería infantil para los niños de la comunidad, donde las lecciones diarias se centran, después del terremoto, en el bienestar emocional de los niños más que en el aprendizaje.“La escuela es el vehículo para ayudar a los niños y a sus madres, y esa es la más fundamental forma de ayuda”, dijo Cantos. “Es importante seguir trabajando con las mujeres y los niños porque ellos son los más afectados”.El terremoto de 7,8 de magnitud azotó a la altura de la costa central el 16 de abril en lo que las personas que lo vivieron describen como una “onda larga y lenta” que llevó a muchos a temer que seguiría un tsunami. Además de los centenares que murieron, más de 12.000 personas sufrieron lesiones. Y una semana después, las réplicas continuaban sacudiendo el país y los nervios de la gente.Compañeros de la Diócesis de Tennessee posan junto con miembros de [la iglesia de] Santiago Apóstol en La Pila, una pequeña comunidad a 40 minutos en auto de Manta. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS[La Iglesia Episcopal de] Ecuador está dividida en dos diócesis, la Diócesis de Ecuador Central, con sede en Quito, y Ecuador Litoral, que se extiende desde Guayaquil, la ciudad más grande y capital financiera del país, hasta el norte a lo largo de la costa, una zona popular de turistas e inmigrantes.El terremoto causó daños estructurales que se calculan en $4.000 millones, una cifra estratosférica en un país económicamente asediado por la caída de los precios del petróleo y ahora también por un descenso del turismo.“Nadie estaba preparado para el terremoto; fue como una película”, dijo la Rda. Betty Juárez Villamar, la única mujer sacerdote de la región, que atiende tanto la iglesia episcopal de San Esteban, a corta distancia en auto de San José Obrero, y la iglesia episcopal de San Pablo cerca de la playa.En la comunidad costera de Manta —a unas 3,5 horas en auto hacia el norte desde Guayaquil— los edificios dañados están esparcidos por toda la ciudad y más de 580 ya han sido demolidos. La “zona cero”, un distrito comercial de poco más de 2 hectáreas, ya está acordonado para la demolición. Muchas personas viven en campamentos improvisados que han construido con materiales rescatados y otras viven en tiendas de campaña en el exterior de sus hogares o en el perímetro de la zona. Algunos residentes desplazados viven en zonas custodiadas y en tiendas azules proporcionadas por el gobierno de China.La primera prioridad de la diócesis fue contribuir a que las familias lograran una sensación de paz y seguridad en el tiempo que siguió al terremoto, dijo Alfredo Morante, el obispo de Ecuador Litoral. Además de eso, la diócesis intenta ayudar  a las personas a reconstruir sus casas y a encontrar empleo.Una de las formas de ayudar a aliviar la presión y la tensión sobre las familias es proporcionarles a las personas un espacio para contar sus historias y comenzar a recuperarse del trauma provocado por el terremoto.El Rdo. Jairo Chiran Guillén, diácono y vicario encargado de Santiago Apóstol en La Pila, habla durante el taller de respuesta al desastre que tuvo lugar el 11 de junio en San José Obrero. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENSDesde 1998, los compañeros de Tennessee han hecho visitas anuales a Ecuador. En la noche del 11 de junio, dirigieron un taller de respuesta al desastre para instruir a las personas respecto a las etapas de duelo y la importancia de priorizar la salud espiritual y mental.Además de la de San José Obrero, el grupo visitó otras tres iglesias para escuchar las historias de los miembros de la comunidad y expresar su solidaridad y su preocupación.“Parte de nuestra relación a lo largo de los últimos 20 años ha sido compartir nuestras historias; para nosotros los de Tennessee es importante escuchar”, dijo George Kurz, que coordina las relaciones de compañerismo y quien codirigió los talleres junto a Sarena Pettit. “Volveremos a Tennessee y compartiremos las historias de ustedes. Contar sus historias es parte de la recuperación.“Es importante para todos ustedes ser pacientes y generosos los unos con los otros en tanto continúan contando sus historias”.Virginia María Quijije Lucas toma notas durante el taller de respuesta al desastre el 11 de junio. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENSEl taller del 11 de junio se basó en un material de la Agencia Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo para abordar las necesidades de personas que acuden a la iglesia en busca de ayuda luego de un desastre. Al taller en San José Obrero asistieron más de 50 personas, muchas de las cuales vinieron en autobús de [la congregación] de Santiago Apóstol en La Pila, una zona que queda a unos 40 minutos de distancia por carretera.Luego de aprender acerca del ciclo vital emocional de un desastre, los participantes se dividieron en cuatro grupos más pequeños y sostuvieron discusiones en base a lecturas bíblicas —Salmo 6 y los capítulos 11 y 12 de Mateo— y una serie de preguntas con vistas a procesar el sufrimiento y la importancia del cuidado personal.Como compañeras, las iglesias de Tennessee mantienen a sus homólogas ecuatorianas en sus pensamientos y en la Oración de los Fieles.“Estamos con ustedes en espíritu y en oración”, dijo Pettit —miembro de [la iglesia de] San José de Arimatea [St. Joseph of Arimathea] en Hendersonville, quien también sirve como intérprete de español para el grupo— durante una visita a Santiago Apóstol en La Pila. “Todas las semanas oramos por ustedes en nuestras iglesias y estamos aquí para ayudarles en todo lo que podamos”.Saulo Cirilo Lucas Muentes habla sobre el terremoto del 16 de abril. Su esposa, Miryan Inés Lucas Mero, y las dos hijas de la pareja, estaban en una fiesta de cumpleaños cuando se produjo el terremoto de 7,8 de magnitud. Anne Ridens, de la iglesia del Buen Pastor [Good Shepherd] en Brentwood, Tennessee, escucha durante una visita a Santiago Apóstol en La Pila. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENSDurante la visita, Miryan Inés Lucas Mero contó la historia de cómo ella estaba con una de sus hijas en una fiesta de cumpleaños, mientras su marido estaba en otra fiesta y su otra hija estaba en casa. Justo antes del terremoto, la hija que se había quedado en casa se reunió con su madre y su hermana. Ambas hijas estaban sentadas junto a ella dos minutos antes de que azotara el terremoto. Antes que nadie percibiera el temblor, la hija mayor dijo que venía. Cuando lo dijo por segunda vez, empezaron a sentir que el suelo se movía, soltaron su pedazo de pastel y corrieron hacia fuera, donde vieron como el edificio se desplomaba.El marido de Lucas, Saulo Cirilo Lucas Muentes, guardián mayor de la iglesia, estaba frenético porque creía que una de sus hijas estaba sola en casa, y su esposa estaba aterrada de pensar que él había muerto, si no de lesiones, debido a su alta tensión arterial.Regresaron a su casa en la oscuridad frente a edificios derrumbados. El servicio de teléfonos celulares dejó de funcionar y los miembros de la familia no podían ponerse en contacto. Muchas de las personas acudieron a la iglesia porque no tenían ningún otro lugar adonde ir. Cuando amaneció y fueron capaces de ver la magnitud del daño y como la escasez de alimento y agua resultaba evidente, las cosas se pusieron aun peor. “Era el caos”, contó ella.La Rda. Mariana Loor consuela a Cecilia Lorena Quijije Gómez mientras ella cuenta su historia y Sarena Pettit interpreta para el grupo de Tennessee. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENSOtras dos mujeres, Martha Alexandra Palma Mezones y Cecilia Lorena Quijije Gómez, asistían a un retiro en Guayaquil y sus hijos estaban en casa cuando se produjo el terremoto. Sus hijos sobrevivieron, pero Palma perdió su hogar y ahora vive con su madre, y Quijije está viviendo en el patio porque su casa sufrió importantes daños.Muchas personas perdieron sus hogares y ahora viven con otros miembros de su familia hacinados bajo un mismo techo.Los compañeros de Tennessee tenían planes de visitar a sus homólogos de Ecuador Litoral antes de que se produjera el terremoto. Miembros de [la congregación de] San Felipe [St. Philip’s] en Nashville, que buscan una iglesia compañera, iban a acompañarlos. Originalmente, el grupo de 11 personas tenía el doble en número, de los cuales algunos miembros iban a montar una clínica. Pero el obispo les pidió que el grupo se concentrara en un ministerio de presencia, lo cual lo llevó a nuevas percepciones.“Durante mucho tiempo hemos notado que las mujeres y los niños asistían en una desproporcionada mayoría a los oficios de la iglesia y que las mujeres ocupaban la mayoría [si no la totalidad] de los puestos de liderazgo en muchas iglesias en [la diócesis de Ecuador] Litoral”, dijo Kurz, luego de la visita.Él y otros del grupo no estaban al tanto de los elevados índices de violencia doméstica en Ecuador, violencia que se ha intensificado después del terremoto.El Dr. Marc Mickiewicz, de la iglesia del Buen Pastor en Brentwood, Tennessee, y la Rda. Betty Juárez Villamar participan de una discusión en un pequeño grupo durante el taller sobre respuesta al desastre el 11 de junio. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS“Para las familias donde los hombres perdieron sus empleos debido as los daños sufridos en las fábricas o a las empresas que se destruyeron, las condiciones para el abuso y el hambre se han exacerbado”, afirmó. “Esta es la primera vez que he oído a una persona preparada [Cantos] dentro de la Iglesia en      [la Diócesis] Litoral abordar estos problemas y me quedé estupefacto al darme cuenta de su extensión”.El año pasado, cuando Cantos, que desempeña un trabajo secular de lunes a viernes en Guayaquil, vivía en Manta, dirigía un grupo semanal para las madres de los niños. Las reuniones le brindaban a las mujeres un espacio para compartir sus historias y le dieron a él la oportunidad de instruirlas acerca de sus derechos legales. No existe un sistema de albergues, resaltó, y muchas mujeres no tienen más opción que regresar con sus parejas abusadoras.“ El 90 por ciento de estas mujeres [de las 20 que participaron] eran víctimas de abusos y no tenían modo alguno de lidiar con eso”, dijo Cantos durante la reunión, explicando que carecían de la educación o de la comprensión para saber adonde acudir a denunciar el abuso. Dos de las mujeres tomaron medidas, explicó él. Y añadió que el número de las que buscan ayuda es escaso debido a los prejuicios profundamente arraigados de una cultura machista que lleva a presionar, aun a sus propias madres, a permanecer junto a un hombre abusador.Y con el terremoto, esa presión se ha incrementado. Algo en que los compañeros de Tennessee podrían estar dispuestos a ayudar.“Si bien las condiciones para otras congregaciones pueden ser distintas a ésta, me doy cuenta ahora de que este es un factor que deberíamos de considerar como parte de nuestra relación al trabajar con las iglesias en Ecuador”, dijo Kurz, añadiendo que puede ser un área en la cual los compañeros puedan asistir proporcionándoles adiestramiento y materiales al clero y los líderes laicos locales.– Lynette Wilson es reportera y redactora de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Latin America Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Anglican Communion, Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Collierville, TN center_img Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Cathedral Dean Boise, ID This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listing Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Knoxville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Events Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 last_img read more