Raiders beat Chargers in prime time finale at Coliseum

first_imgOAKLAND — Josh Jacobs scored on an 18-yard run with 1:02 to play and the Raiders gave their late-night fans something to remember them by in a 26-24 win over the Los Angeles Chargers at the Coliseum.The last prime time game in Oakland ended when Karl Joseph made a leaping interception of a Philip Rivers pass — the last one a familiar rival will throw in a venue where he came in with a 9-4 career record. It touched off a celebration which found coach Jon Gruden making his way to the Black …last_img read more

Rooibos takes the fight to diabetes

first_imgRooibos tea is available in the usual amber, or oxidised variety, as well as the green or unoxidised form. (Image: MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. For more free images, visit the image library) The annual World Diabetes Day aims to raise awareness of the condition and what can be done to treat and prevent it.(Image: International Diabetes Foundation) MEDIA CONTACTS • Keegan Hall  Marketing and PR, Diabetes South Africa  +27 11 886 3765 RELATED ARTICLES • Tackling the silent five • SA’s second health train rolls out • World Cancer Day marked in SA • Research says rooibos beats stress • Research to boost rooibos exports Janine ErasmusWorld Diabetes Day, held annually in November, aims to raise global awareness of the disease and what can be done, in many cases, to prevent it. A team of South African researchers has released results of a promising study that involves the beneficial effect of rooibos on blood sugar levels.The rooibos plant (Aspalathus linearis), a member of the legume family and indigenous to South Africa, is known for its health-boosting properties. Rooibos is usually made into a tea – or more correctly, a tisane, as it is a non-caffeinated beverage – that has various healthful effects ranging from antioxidant properties to a calming effect and a good night’s sleep.Scientific studies with animals and to a lesser degree, with humans, have shown that rooibos can also restore immune function and generally improve the immune system. In a UK study, rare poison dart frogs that were reared from tadpoles in a rooibos-infused liquid became resistant to fungal infection. This is because the antioxidants in rooibos have anti-fungal properties as well, according to the frog research team.Now new evidence has emerged that rooibos can combat diabetes in rats and, with more research, possibly humans. Results of the study were published on 19 October in the online version of Phytomedicine journal, under the title Acute assessment of an aspalathin-enriched green rooibos extract with hypoglycemic potential.The study was a joint effort between the Diabetes Discovery Platform from South Africa’s Medical Research Council (MRC) and the Agricultural Research Council’s (ARC) Infruitec-Nietvoorbij Institute, with the help of the National Research Foundation.“Although we have started off with small animals,” says team leader Dr Johan Louw of the MRC, “the next step is to take our research to human patients – provided we can secure funding.”Louw explains that, as the research models are designed to simulate what is seen in humans, he is confident that the team will be able to duplicate the rat results. He clarifies that people with diabetes type one, which is controlled with insulin, won’t see a benefit but that type two patients, who control their condition largely through diet, will.“Our focus as scientists is the promotion of healthy lifestyles and a healthier population, not just in South Africa but all over the world – so don’t hesitate to drink that cup of rooibos as part of a good diet,” he says. “Obviously you can’t do anything about your age or your family history, but there are certain factors that you have control over, such as your eating habits or your level of activity.”World Diabetes Day is an initiative of the International Diabetes Federation and the World Health Organisation. The date, 14 November, celebrates the birthday of Canadian Nobel laureate Frederick Banting, who is credited with the life-saving discovery of insulin, along with his colleague Charles Best.Rooibos health benefitsThe diabetes study was carried out with extracts of green rooibos, prepared by Prof Lizette Joubert of the ARC and analysed by the MRC. Green rooibos is the unoxidised version of the amber-coloured tea available widely in South African shops and increasingly around the world.“Rooibos has many compounds, which have different effects at different concentrations, but the two we are interested in for this study are aspalathin, which is found exclusively in rooibos, and rutin,” says Louw. “The extracts were enriched with the two compounds. On its own, rutin has no effect while aspalathin has a slight effect, but when they are combined the results are remarkable.”The South African Rooibos Council reports that green rooibos has higher levels of antioxidants – one of which is aspalathin – than normal rooibos, but that both are proven to be beneficial.Monitored over a period of six hours, the two test compounds together succeeded in lowering the blood glucose level of the rats. In humans this could have the same effect as drugs that are currently available.“We are the first in the world to show this effect from rooibos extract,” said Louw.” Rooibos has no side effects for most people and drinking it can only have a positive effect.”For the millions of South Africans who have the condition, this is good news.The Rooibos Council is involved with several MRC projects as a funder. They include the impact of rooibos on weight loss; the role of rooibos in preventing tissue damage during exercise; the influence of rooibos on the biosynthesis of cortisol, known as the stress hormone; and an investigation into the cancer prevention properties of the plant.Raising awarenessThe two organisational founders of World Diabetes Day have set the theme for the annual event as Diabetes education and prevention for five consecutive years, from 2009 to 2013.Diabetes will affect 439-million people around the world by 2030, according to the World Health Organisation. Currently some 6.5-million South Africans have diabetes, although experts feel that number may be under-reported.The disease develops when the body does not produce enough insulin, a hormone that enables cells to absorb glucose from the blood and convert it into energy.Insulin is produced in the pancreas, and diabetes arises when production is halted or is slowed, or the body becomes resistant to the insulin that is produced. The condition falls into two main categories – types one and two – although there are other smaller categories such as gestational diabetes which can sometimes occur during pregnancy.Diabetes type one is a result of non- or under-production of insulin, while type two occurs when the body becomes resistant to the hormone. The first type can only be treated with insulin administration while the second can be managed through diet and exercise, and with extra medication when necessary.Symptoms include weight loss, thirst, frequent urination and fatigue coupled with blurry vision, numbness or tingling in hands and feet, recurring infections of the skin, mouth and bladder, and wounds that are slow to heal.Testing can be done on blood or urine samples at a clinic, doctor or pharmacy. However, healthy living can prevent a multitude of conditions, such as high cholesterol and blood pressure, obesity, and diabetes type two.In South Africa there are various events to mark World Diabetes Day, although they may not happen on the actual day. In Alexandra township, east of Johannesburg, people will come together at the Alexandra Stadium on 17 November for a fun run, educational activities, talks by experts, and tests.On 14 November 2011 Johannesburg’s Nelson Mandela Bridge, which is illuminated with colour-changing LEDs, lit up in blue as a mark of solidarity and support for those who wrestle with diabetes.last_img read more

Cloud Security Using… Social Networks?

first_imgRelated Posts Tags:#cloud#security The issues of cloud/SaaS security have been on my mind since the late 90s when I was working on my first global intranet/extranet project. Personally, I’ve never been terribly concerned with the more lower-level technical details of network architecture, transport protocols or with tedious policy writing; you need good security experts to cover these areas properly. I’ve always been drawn to the more forgivably human downsides to the whole SaaS/Cloud concept like this one: How on earth do you prevent password sharing? I’ve been thinking that the solution may be so obvious, so ubiquitous, that it’s just difficult to see past our own fears: What if we could improve the security of our cloud-based applications by handing over our authentication processes to the social media networks?Steve Henty is an experienced IT Project Manager who has specialized in Web technologies since 1996. He lives in Madrid and is currently working for Toshiba. He can be contacted at steve@henty.es or on Twitter or at http://www.henty.es.The ProblemYou see them everywhere. Those claims that XYZ Web application is 100% secure because it’s as secure as banking online and uses SSL and allows IP restrictions and uses LDAP authentication and etc. All these security features are useful but at the end of the day we’re still faced with the daunting challenge of convincing users not to give out their passwords either intentionally (e.g. by lending to “friends”) or unintentionally (e.g. written notes lying around). As soon as one person in your organisation has divulged his or her account details the entire system is compromised and all the company information is open to whoever gets hold of the password. What’s worse, there’s no real way of know if or when this has happened – even our careless user may be unaware that someone else is using the same account. I sometimes see references to this problem on the Web but I haven’t seen any serious solutions. It tends to get passed off as irrelevant, as if password security has nothing to do with cloud security. But unfortunately its inevitable effect on adoption blows a big hole in the whole cloud computing concept. So currently the industry doesn’t want to talk about this elephant in the room because it might affect uptake, and consequently businesses are not getting the full picture.With 50% of companies in the UK currently thinking about moving to the cloud this year, we’re going to see an increase in security concerns – that is, as soon as these companies realise they’ve had the wool pulled over their eyes. When Strong Isn’t StrongLet’s take a quick look at the ways cloud computing services are currently attempting to deal with the issues of cloud security and examine how they might fall short.SSL: A common claim you hear is that XYZ app is as secure as online banking because it uses the same technology: SSL. While I agree that it’s important to encrypt communication, this claim is borderline fraudulent. People are inherently motivated to keep their online banking account details a secret whereas an employee may actually become motivated to do the complete opposite.IP Restrictions: Some apps let you restrict access from certain IP addresses. This might work if you’re prepared to forego the benefits of device independence, but to my mind this is one of the great advantages of working in the cloud.LDAP Integration: Some apps allow integration with directories such as the Active Directory. This is great – one less directory to manage. However, in addition to the network security headaches this can bring it doesn’t guarantee that the person using the password is actually the person you hope it is.Enterprise Security: Two-factor authentication with security tokens or a sophisticated PKI implementation work nicely if you have the time and resources. If you have any high-profile users you’ll be wanting this level of security to avoid breaches like the one Twitter faced a few months ago. However, these solutions can be so expensive and time-consuming that even a large enterprise would baulk at the cost of rolling this out to 100% of employees. So for most companies it’s just not a feasible option.On The Radar: In the not-so-distant future we may be using mobile phone SIMs, Electronic IDs or government-issued browser certificates to authenticate. But how about right now? Is there anything else we can be doing now, in 2010, to improve the security of our cloud-based apps?The Solution: Social Media Integration?Solutions often seem counterintuitive at first. What if we could increase security by giving up some control? What if we were to relax our grip a little on the whole identity management and authentication process and let the employee share some of the responsibility?Most employees have a personal online identity already, a personal brand that they are inherently motivated to protect. The have a personal email addresses, blogs, Facebook accounts, LinkedIn accounts – public or semi-public profiles all over the Web. What if we were to allow these social media accounts to connect to our company cloud-based apps and perform the authentication process?This could mean, for example, that an employee would be able to access a company CRM application simply by logging into a Facebook or LinkedIn account. A breach in our application’s security would then only come at the expense of a breach in the security of a user’s personal account. This way the responsibility for maintaining security would be would be shared.Now that our users have a vested interest preventing unauthorised access to company data they might actually start taking to heart all the guidelines about strong passwords we’ve been banging on about for so long.It could also be argued that by spreading the accounts over a number of different social media sites, thereby decentralising the authentication process, potential hackers might be deterred from casual password guessing and brute force attacks.Okay, the idea needs to be developed further and it’s far from perfect. There are certainly issues that need to be addressed regarding adoption, privacy and appropriate checks and controls. However, the technology already exists in the form of APIs, Facebook Connect, OAuth and OpenID and others, and the big social media players now have the critical mass of users you’d need in order to pull off something like this. Even attitudes towards privacy appear to be relaxing, so the timing could be perfect. If my assumptions are right, the missing piece in the cloud security puzzle might be right under our noses, and we’d be able to alleviate some of the fear of cloud computing simply by relinquishing some of our need to control.I’d be very interested in your views on the subject – especially if you know of anyone has already had some experience of implementing this in a production environment or has decided against doing it.Photo credit: Joshua Davis. guest author 1 A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…center_img Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

When Are Door Undercuts Sufficient for Return Air?

first_imgThe conventional wisdom on door undercutsAh, conventional wisdom. It’s often not wisdom at all and you may get different versions of it depending on which convention you believe. That’s certainly the case here. Talk to people in the HVAC industry and you’ll find quite a few who say you never need anything more than a door undercut. The one comment I’ve gotten so far on the video on bedroom pressures I made for my last article was, “Ha, ha — 7 pa is >0.03 inches w.c., so… Very little. It will sweep under the door.” He didn’t identify himself as such, but since he thinks in inches of water column (i.w.c.), I have a strong suspicion that he’s an HVAC guy. (I also think the evidence points to the commenter being male, but woman’s intuition doesn’t always get it right, even for someone in Who’s Who of American Women.)That kind of conventional wisdom is why we have homes like my condo, which had a 7 Pascal (Pa) pressure difference before I installed the Tamarack return air pathway in the door. (Disclosure: Tamarack is an advertiser in the Energy Vanguard Blog.) Mike MacFarland of Energy Docs, a home performance contractor in northern California, says it can be even worse than that. He’s found many homes with bedrooms that get pressurized to over 40 Pa when the bedroom door is closed. Wow!In contrast, the statement I threw out in that last article about the inadequacy of door undercuts represents the conventional wisdom of the building science community. Building Science Corporation has a page about door undercuts as return air pathways and says this: “This approach is acceptable but Building America research has demonstrated that the common technique of undercutting bedroom doors does not provide for enough airflow.”They don’t provide the reference to that Building America research but I think it’s probably a study done by the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC). Published online as the Return Air Pathway Study, their report shows the air flow through various types of return air pathways, including door undercuts. The first graph below (Image #2) shows the results.They found that a hole the size of a typical one inch door undercut will allow about 60 cubic feet per minute of air flow. In terms of air flow to size of the hole, door undercuts come out on top. They yield about 2 cfm per square inch of hole. (See Table 60 in their report.) But compared to the air flow many bedrooms need, 60 cfm is on the low side. And that’s with a one inch undercut. With a half inch undercut, the number will be reduced greatly. (Unfortunately, they didn’t include half inch undercuts in their study.)The wisdom of data from real housesBuilding Science Corporation and FSEC are right in calling out door undercuts. As I mentioned above, many in the HVAC industry believe wholeheartedly in door undercuts. In many homes they don’t work. Look at the article I wrote last week about what happens in my condo without the Tamarack return air pathways I installed in the doors.But we also need to understand the bounds of this new understanding about door undercuts. And it’s helpful to know what that FSEC study did not show. Maybe door undercuts work just fine for some houses.That’s what John Semmelhack of Think Little has found. He commented in my last article, writing, “We design and balance systems all the time with central returns and without transfer grilles or jumper ducts for most bedrooms.” He finds that a half inch door undercut works just fine in most of the homes he tests.So, are we back to saying the HVAC folks are right? No, not really. Semmelhack works on high-performance homes. He certifies homes for Energy Star and Passive House and also does some net-zero-energy homes and deep energy retrofits. That’s the first thing the building science conventional wisdom doesn’t include. When a house is really efficient, the bedrooms won’t need as much supply air delivered.The other thing neglected by the building science conventional wisdom is the other paths for air flow. When you close a bedroom door, the undercut isn’t the only pathway for return air. Walk over to a bedroom (or other interior) door and close it. Look at the gaps on the sides and top. Grab the handle and see how much movement there is.The door undercut gets all the attention, but the sides and top of the door also allow a good amount of air to flow through. Semmelhack believes the air flow through the sides and top of the door is equal to the air flow through the undercut. So if you can get 60 cfm under the door, you can get about 120 cfm total.And that’s what the FSEC study seems to have missed. They don’t discuss it in their report, but it appears from the photos that their only pathway for air flow was the hole they cut. They built a little test hut out of foam board, which I imagine was airtight except for the holes being tested. They didn’t discuss the airtightness of the hut in their report.Semmelhack is one of the people in our industry who goes out and tests things to make sure they work. It’s required, of course, for Energy Star and Passive House, but he goes further than is required. The second graph below shows his data for the pressure difference in bedrooms as a function of the conditioned air supplied to the bedroom.It’s not a tremendous amount of data, but it’s enough to see that door undercuts work. For supply air up to about 80 cfm, the pressure stays below the Energy Star threshold of 3 Pascals (Pa). All of the bedrooms being tested here have only half inch door undercuts as return air pathways. No return vents, jumper ducts, or transfer grilles. And the vast majority meet the Energy Star requirement of <3 pa pressure difference between the bedroom and hall. only twice has semmelhack had a problem getting bedrooms under 3 threshold with 75 cfm of supply air. in both cases, door was installed really tightly.The new building science conventional wisdomAs is so often the case, the truth is found between the extremes. Door undercuts are neither always adequate nor always inadequate. Sometimes they work. Sometimes they don’t. With low-load homes, the lower air flow required in bedrooms means that half-inch door undercuts — along with the flow around the sides and top of the door — might well be sufficient. The more air required for a bedroom, the more likely it is you’ll need to put in an additional return air pathway.Of course, it’s pretty easy to get this right. All we need is proper commissioning. If every home were tested for bedroom pressure differences and held to a maximum of 3 Pa, we wouldn’t need to have this discussion. Allison Bailes of Decatur, Georgia, is a speaker, writer, building science consultant, and the author of the Energy Vanguard Blog. You can follow him on Twitter at @EnergyVanguard. Bathroom_fan_makeup_air-Joe_Nagan.pdf Most people don’t know that simply closing a door in their home can make them sick, increase their energy bills, or reduce their comfort. We live in this invisible stuff called air. We pull many pounds of it into our lungs each day. A typical air conditioner, heat pump, or furnace easily moves 20 tons of air a day. (Yes, I’m talking about 40,000 pounds! We’ll save that calculation for another day, though.) And the simple act of closing a door changes the dynamics of a house in ways that can have profound impacts on the people inside the home.Last week I wrote about the problem of bedroom doors getting closed, the consequences of that action, and one way to alleviate the problem. In that article I mentioned the issue of undercutting the bedroom doors as the standard method many homes used as a return air pathway. The air pumped into a bedroom needs to find its way back to the air conditioner, heat pump, or furnace. Door undercuts are one such return air pathway. But, I wrote, “Door undercuts typically won’t allow enough air to get out of the bedroom unless you leave a gap bigger than most people want under their doors.” RELATED ARTICLESReturn-Air ProblemsReturn to Sender – HVAC Return Pathway OptionsPerfect Balance Makes the CutNew Green Building Products — March 2011An Easy Retrofit for Return AirThis New Door Design Solves an Old ProblemAll About Furnaces and Duct SystemsResidential CommissioningIs It OK to Close Air Conditioner Vents in Unused Rooms?last_img read more

Creamline upends Perlas for fourth win

first_imgPagasa: Storm intensifies as it nears PAR Cayetano dares Lacson, Drilon to take lie-detector test: Wala akong kinita sa SEA Games Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Sablan on Bonleon’s tirades: Truth will come out Every 18 seconds someone is diagnosed with HIV Palace: Duterte to hear out security execs on alleged China control of NGCP BSP survey: PH banks see bright horizon amid dark global recession clouds BREAKING: Cop killed, 11 hurt in Misamis Oriental grenade blast Creamline has struggled mightily this season despite the heroics of Alyssa Valdez who led the Cool Smashers with 20 points. Valdez and company never managed to string sizeable victories to put them in contention for a top-two spot. FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingImports Kuttika Kaewpin and Laura Schaudt had 17 and 16 points, respectively to help Creamline bRupia Inck had 20 points to lead Perlas while Amy Ahomiro added 11. BREAKING: Cop killed, 11 hurt in Misamis Oriental grenade blast Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students PLAY LIST 01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes LATEST STORIES Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netCreamline earned its fourth win in the Premier Volleyball League after taking down Perlas in four sets 25-19, 25-20, 23-25, 25-14, Thursday at Filoil Flying V Centre. The Cool Smashers improved to a 4-6 card but are still the second-worst team in the six-team league while the Spikers slipped to 5-5. ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View commentslast_img read more