“CROKER IN THE FIRST WEEK OF FEBRUARY WILL BE A BIG CHALLENGE FOR US” – MCGLYNN

first_imgFrank McGlynn admits this weekend’s clash with Dublin will be a big test for Donegal.Donegal GAA star Frank McGlynn has admitted that the prospect of facing Dublin in Croke Park is a daunting prospect but says he and his teammates are looking forward to the challenge.McGlynn has been one of the most consistent performers for Donegal over the last number of years and has won two All-Star awards.The Glenfin defender played in last Saturday’s victory over Derry, and as always delivered a quality and assured display. However, McGlynn admits facing a Dublin side seeking to exact revenge for their All-Ireland semi-final loss in August in the first week of February will be a big challenge for Donegal.McGlynn told The Irish News, “Some people will look at it and think that they have a score to settle with us.“For us, it will be a matter of putting a performance together. It’s difficult to go away from home in the league, especially in the first week of February to go to Croke Park.“Your fitness levels have to be at an optimum to perform in Croke Park. It’s going to be a challenge, but it will be a challenge for both teams. “No one wants to go to Croke Park and put in a bad performance.Donegal haven’t won a game away from home in the Allianz National League competition since 2008.That record will have to end sometime, and new Donegal manager Rory Gallagher would n doubt love it to come this weekend against Dublin.  “CROKER IN THE FIRST WEEK OF FEBRUARY WILL BE A BIG CHALLENGE FOR US” – MCGLYNN was last modified: February 4th, 2015 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:ALLIANZ NATIONAL LEAGUECroke ParkdonegaldublinFrank McGlynnGAAnewsSportlast_img read more

O’Hanen’s effort spoiled as B52s fall to Fairfield Indians in extra innings

first_imgEureka >> Timmion Hughes’ line-drive single to left field scored David Amiccuci with the go-ahead run as the Fairfield Indians downed the Humboldt B52s 2-1 in extra innings on Friday at Bomber Field, spoiling an excellent effort by Humboldt starting pitcher Zach O’Hanen.O’Hanen and Indians starter Sean Jackson threw up nothing but goose eggs on the scoreboard through the first six innings of the game, as the game quickly turned into a pitcher’s duel between the two hurlers.O’Hanen, who …last_img read more

Raiders beat Chargers in prime time finale at Coliseum

first_imgOAKLAND — Josh Jacobs scored on an 18-yard run with 1:02 to play and the Raiders gave their late-night fans something to remember them by in a 26-24 win over the Los Angeles Chargers at the Coliseum.The last prime time game in Oakland ended when Karl Joseph made a leaping interception of a Philip Rivers pass — the last one a familiar rival will throw in a venue where he came in with a 9-4 career record. It touched off a celebration which found coach Jon Gruden making his way to the Black …last_img read more

Play Your Part, appreciate and observe our human rights

first_imgJohannesburg, Thursday 20 March 2014 – South Africa will commemorate its 20th Human Rights Day tomorrow Friday 21 March 2014 and the ultimate sacrifice of those who were killed when they protested for the right to free movement in Sharpeville in 1960. Speaking on the eve of Human Rights Day, Brand South Africa CEO Miller Matola said, “South Africa has moved from a culture of oppression and intolerance to a culture of respect and acceptance. Our Constitution and our Bill of Rights attest to how far we have come in enabling all the people of this country to express their human rights as free and equal citizens.” “We must all play our part to make sure that we appreciate and observe the human rights principles enshrined in our Constitution and these become part of our collective national psyche.” “This will be essential to ensuring the durability of our democracy,” concluded Mr Matola.Note to EditorsThe Constitution of South Africa can be accessed at: http://www.gov.za/documents/constitution/1996/a108-96.pdf About Brand South Africa Brand South Africa is the official marketing agency of South Africa, with a mandate to build the country’s brand reputation, in order to improve its global competitiveness. Its aim is also to build pride and patriotism among South Africans, in order to contribute to social cohesion and nation brand ambassadorship. Further resources from Brand South AfricaMedia are invited to visit http://www.southafrica.info/ for further resources which can be reproduced without any copyright infringement.  Kindly attribute to Brand South Africa. Join the conversation at:Follow Brand South Africa@Brand_SAhttps://twitter.com/Brand_SAhttps://www.facebook.com/BrandSouthAfricaTell us how you Play Your Part@PlayyourpartSA http://www.playyourpart.co.za/tellus-someone For more information or to set up interviews, please contact: Sandisiwe GugushePublic Relations International: Brand South AfricaTel: +27 11 712 5007 Mobile: +27 (0) 73 126 9128Email: sandisiweg@brandsouthafrica.comlast_img read more

World’s Oldest Unfound Geocache is Found! – Getting the FTF After 12 years

first_imgThe noble steed and the river.Many anxious geocachers set alerts to ping them when a new geocache is published. Within minutes of going live, a geocacher rushed to claim the FTF (First to Find). In the case of one lonely geocache, in an uninhabited swath of Canada,  it took nearly 12 years for a brave and determined geocacher to venture into the wilderness and sign the logbook. 4.5lb Walleye (GCDFB) was hidden June 23, 2001. It registered its first find on June 8, 2013 by geocacher Stormgren-X. Here’s his story.The idea for finding this geocache came to Stormgren-X months before he set out. “I planned the trip myself over a six month period from researching the route, history, other accounts of this amazing canoe route, food, gear, and logistics of getting to the launch site and getting out and back home,” he said, “I was prepared to do the trip solo, but managed to convince my life-long friend to join me on this amazing journey along this historical canoe route.”On the day before they left, Stormgren-X posted about their journey in the Geocaching Forums and included a link to the Spot tracking page, “I expected a few people on the geocache watchlist to perhaps follow along from time to time.  By the time we reached Fort Albany and were set up in our lodge, I…was overwhelmed to see 375 replies to my thread.  It was amazing and I felt great that so many people were watching and cheering us on…So many emails of encouragement and positive comments.  We were pleased that we offered some sort of live entertainment and discussion to the geocaching community on our journey…”From there, the real adventure began. The first two days of canoeing  proved to be the most difficult. Stormgren-X recalls, “The winds and rain were non-stop and made for freezing toes and fingers, [and] poor morale…” After the initial problems, the weather cleared and made for an enjoyable trip. On the eighth day, they reached ground zero and finally found the geocache, “…I saw a foreign object. It looked like a rounded corner of something, and I grabbed it between index finger and thumb and pulled on it. I easily pulled it out from it’s hiding spot under the moss and yelled at Gord, “Here it is! I found it!”I placed it on the ground and immediately took notice that it was intact and contents were still inside.”Found it! Stormgren-X with the 4.5lb Walleye.Regarding the trip, Stormgren-X said, “The eight and a half days we spent on this arctic watershed adventure is one I won’t soon forget. Being immersed in that environment, without communication with the outside world, and seeing so few people was so refreshing from the busy and modern life we are so accustomed to. The historic places we visited and the thoughts of men and women who toiled in this land to make a life for themselves was astounding. Many times we felt so small and insignificant in such a vast wilderness, but so connected to it at the same time. To travel 435 km along such a huge waterway and not see many people, any roads, bridges, railways, dams, or industry is something difficult to find in this world. I consider myself lucky to have experienced the voyage and the great memories.”To hear more about this amazing journey, check out the Podcacher podcast that features an interview with Stormgren-X. You can also read the full write-up. Geocaching milestones of this caliber are out there, just waiting to be found. Will you be the next adventurer to earn one of these epic smileys?Also: enjoy a few more photos of the trip courtesy of Stormgren-X:View along the riverAt one of the stops along the river.Canoeing in lovely weatherShare with your Friends:More SharePrint RelatedFeatured Geocacher of the Month Award WinnersAugust 25, 2011In “Community”Down, down, down into the underground – Below Above, The Fallen Monarch (GC2GAMT) – Geocache of the WeekApril 3, 2013In “Community”The Seanachai: Keeper of the Old Lore, Reviewer of the New CachesMay 6, 2015In “Community”last_img read more

Cloud Security Using… Social Networks?

first_imgRelated Posts Tags:#cloud#security The issues of cloud/SaaS security have been on my mind since the late 90s when I was working on my first global intranet/extranet project. Personally, I’ve never been terribly concerned with the more lower-level technical details of network architecture, transport protocols or with tedious policy writing; you need good security experts to cover these areas properly. I’ve always been drawn to the more forgivably human downsides to the whole SaaS/Cloud concept like this one: How on earth do you prevent password sharing? I’ve been thinking that the solution may be so obvious, so ubiquitous, that it’s just difficult to see past our own fears: What if we could improve the security of our cloud-based applications by handing over our authentication processes to the social media networks?Steve Henty is an experienced IT Project Manager who has specialized in Web technologies since 1996. He lives in Madrid and is currently working for Toshiba. He can be contacted at steve@henty.es or on Twitter or at http://www.henty.es.The ProblemYou see them everywhere. Those claims that XYZ Web application is 100% secure because it’s as secure as banking online and uses SSL and allows IP restrictions and uses LDAP authentication and etc. All these security features are useful but at the end of the day we’re still faced with the daunting challenge of convincing users not to give out their passwords either intentionally (e.g. by lending to “friends”) or unintentionally (e.g. written notes lying around). As soon as one person in your organisation has divulged his or her account details the entire system is compromised and all the company information is open to whoever gets hold of the password. What’s worse, there’s no real way of know if or when this has happened – even our careless user may be unaware that someone else is using the same account. I sometimes see references to this problem on the Web but I haven’t seen any serious solutions. It tends to get passed off as irrelevant, as if password security has nothing to do with cloud security. But unfortunately its inevitable effect on adoption blows a big hole in the whole cloud computing concept. So currently the industry doesn’t want to talk about this elephant in the room because it might affect uptake, and consequently businesses are not getting the full picture.With 50% of companies in the UK currently thinking about moving to the cloud this year, we’re going to see an increase in security concerns – that is, as soon as these companies realise they’ve had the wool pulled over their eyes. When Strong Isn’t StrongLet’s take a quick look at the ways cloud computing services are currently attempting to deal with the issues of cloud security and examine how they might fall short.SSL: A common claim you hear is that XYZ app is as secure as online banking because it uses the same technology: SSL. While I agree that it’s important to encrypt communication, this claim is borderline fraudulent. People are inherently motivated to keep their online banking account details a secret whereas an employee may actually become motivated to do the complete opposite.IP Restrictions: Some apps let you restrict access from certain IP addresses. This might work if you’re prepared to forego the benefits of device independence, but to my mind this is one of the great advantages of working in the cloud.LDAP Integration: Some apps allow integration with directories such as the Active Directory. This is great – one less directory to manage. However, in addition to the network security headaches this can bring it doesn’t guarantee that the person using the password is actually the person you hope it is.Enterprise Security: Two-factor authentication with security tokens or a sophisticated PKI implementation work nicely if you have the time and resources. If you have any high-profile users you’ll be wanting this level of security to avoid breaches like the one Twitter faced a few months ago. However, these solutions can be so expensive and time-consuming that even a large enterprise would baulk at the cost of rolling this out to 100% of employees. So for most companies it’s just not a feasible option.On The Radar: In the not-so-distant future we may be using mobile phone SIMs, Electronic IDs or government-issued browser certificates to authenticate. But how about right now? Is there anything else we can be doing now, in 2010, to improve the security of our cloud-based apps?The Solution: Social Media Integration?Solutions often seem counterintuitive at first. What if we could increase security by giving up some control? What if we were to relax our grip a little on the whole identity management and authentication process and let the employee share some of the responsibility?Most employees have a personal online identity already, a personal brand that they are inherently motivated to protect. The have a personal email addresses, blogs, Facebook accounts, LinkedIn accounts – public or semi-public profiles all over the Web. What if we were to allow these social media accounts to connect to our company cloud-based apps and perform the authentication process?This could mean, for example, that an employee would be able to access a company CRM application simply by logging into a Facebook or LinkedIn account. A breach in our application’s security would then only come at the expense of a breach in the security of a user’s personal account. This way the responsibility for maintaining security would be would be shared.Now that our users have a vested interest preventing unauthorised access to company data they might actually start taking to heart all the guidelines about strong passwords we’ve been banging on about for so long.It could also be argued that by spreading the accounts over a number of different social media sites, thereby decentralising the authentication process, potential hackers might be deterred from casual password guessing and brute force attacks.Okay, the idea needs to be developed further and it’s far from perfect. There are certainly issues that need to be addressed regarding adoption, privacy and appropriate checks and controls. However, the technology already exists in the form of APIs, Facebook Connect, OAuth and OpenID and others, and the big social media players now have the critical mass of users you’d need in order to pull off something like this. Even attitudes towards privacy appear to be relaxing, so the timing could be perfect. If my assumptions are right, the missing piece in the cloud security puzzle might be right under our noses, and we’d be able to alleviate some of the fear of cloud computing simply by relinquishing some of our need to control.I’d be very interested in your views on the subject – especially if you know of anyone has already had some experience of implementing this in a production environment or has decided against doing it.Photo credit: Joshua Davis. guest author 1 A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…center_img Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

Get a Viral Launch Page For Your Startup With LaunchRock

first_imgRelated Posts Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Tags:#start#tips If you want to see the virality of LaunchRock in action, search Twitter for “Maple Butter,” a new project from Flowtown‘s Dan Martell. And the sign-ups for LaunchRock itself aren’t too shabby – over 5000 since the website went live this weekend.The LaunchRock service gives you the tools to build your launch page – you simply point the A record of your domain to the IP address LaunchRock provides. You’ll get a unique URL to share as well as analytics about who and how much sharing is going on.According to co-founder Jameson Detweiler, “I look at it this way, you manage email marketing campaigns with tools such as Mailchimp and Constant Contact, and you manage support with tools such as GetSatisfaction and Zendesk. Why not a tool that’s built to assist in the various vital steps of launching and growing a business?”The LaunchRock team say that they’re planning on adding some additional features, including A/B testing of marketing messages and a LaunchRock widget on your own hosted landing page. But in general, says Detweiler, the focus is helping people “rock” the launch process. “We want to expand on what we’re doing here and build tools to help people find their best users and engage them as effectively as possible.” audrey watters We’ve written before about the importance of having a Web presence for your startup, even if you aren’t prepared to launch. But a team at this weekend’s Startup Weekend in Philadelphia has taken this idea one step further, designing a product that will help startups build viral launch pages: LaunchRock.LaunchRock is one of those incredibly simple but incredibly awesome ideas. Built by Jameson Detweiler, Dave Drager, and Stephen Gill over the three days of Startup Weekend, LaunchRock makes it incredibly simple to get interested users signed up for your startup service or product, pre-launch. Of course, any “please give us your email address” option can do that, but LaunchRock makes it incredibly easy for users to share the link to your launch page to friends. Even more importantly, it rewards those users who are most eager – based on the number of friends they invite – by bumping them up the list of those slated to get access to your site. Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

4 policemen suspended as boy dies in crossfire

first_imgFour policemen including two sub-inspectors were suspended on Thursday after an eight-year-old nursery student Madhav Bhardwaj was shot dead in an encounter with robbers at Mohanpura village, in Mathura on Wednesday. The suspensions came after a probe was conducted into the death of the child with the villagers alleging that the child was hit by police bullet. ₹5 lakh compensationInspector General of Police, Agra range, Raja Shrivastava suspended the sub-inspectors Virendra Singh and Saurabbh Sharma and two policemen Udham Singh and Subhash for their prime facie failure to attend to the boy immediately after he was hit by the bullet while playing in the nearby park. Mr. Shrivastava also announced a magisterial probe into the incident and announced a compensation of ₹5 lakh to the boy’s family. According to Vinay Chauhan, Circle Officer Mathura, a team of policemen had reached Mohanpura village after getting information that Manoj, an accused in a recent loot case, was seen in the village.“Manoj and his group fired at the police. The police retaliated. In the crossfire, a bullet which was fired from the gang’s side, hit Madhav on his head. Though he was rushed to the local hospital, he succumbed to the injuries,” said Mr. Chauhan who also denied police shooting in the episode.An FIR was being registered on the basis of a complaint filed by the villagers, the police said. Shiv Shankar, Madhav’s grandfather told The Hindu: “The tragedy happened in no time. The last time I saw Madhav, he was playing in the park. After that I saw some policemen who started firing. Madhav, who was playing in the park, got hit.”last_img read more

Tripura to set up museum to showcase R.D. Burman’s work

first_imgThe Tripura government on Saturday announced that a museum to showcase the work of celebrated music composer R.D. Burman would be built. Chief Minister Biplab Kumar Deb conveyed the decision to singing icon Asha Bhosle, wife of the maestro.He requested her to inaugurate the museum after its completion. “I have also invited her to Tripura, land of Pancham da (as late R.D. Buram was popularly known) on behalf of the 37 lakhs people of the State,” Mr. Deb said.“Ashaji accepted the invitation.”Commitment to artsThe Chief Minister said his government was committed to promote the art and culture in every possible way.Members of the Tripura royal family, R.D. Burman and his celebrated music composer father S.D. Burman paid only a few visits to the State in their lifetime owing to the busy engagements in Bollywood.last_img read more

Stiff clauses will undo the foreign varsities Bill

first_imgOne of the major challenges on the higher education landscape in India will be to create infrastructure capabilities and a suitable environment to ensure that the huge gap between supply and demand is filled, or at least reduced considerably. But rough estimates of the number of young aspirants for higher education (post school) will almost double by 2016-30. Needless to say, this will be a complex and difficult job; the sheer scale of it is daunting.Mindless and unplanned growth will not only spoil the existing fabric of higher education, but might start off something which will be difficult to rectify and control later. Given the scale of the needs and urgency, it is quite clear that private players, and public-private partnership, along with massive efforts of the government, will be required. Already, in recent times a large number of private institutions have sprung up and although some of these have created reasonable infra-structure, their focus has remained limited to what they perceive as the needs of the “market”.NeedMany of these institutions also proudly display their association with educational institutions abroad. On their part, given their more recent perceptions about its economic growth and huge demand for higher education, the foreign educators are more than tempted to bring their expertise to India. On the other hand, there is no question that higher education in India can benefit enormously from those who have proven credentials, abilities and the desire to come to India, independently or in collaboration with existing universities/institutions in India, both public and private.advertisementMore so, in several areas where we have not been able to create facilities and trained manpower including those which may be considered non-traditional, but are in great demand in present times, for example, film making, media, animation, product design, automobile engineering and design, subject related to the hospitality industry, clinical studies, hospital management, conflict resolution, diplomacy, town planning, food processing and so on.I know this because of my own association with a number of scholarship schemes for studies abroad where one often finds that there are none at all, or very meagre facilities at present in the country. Many of these areas are not only relevant, they are now established subjects of teaching and research. However, whether foreign educators in these areas will come and establish facilities or they will all opt for softer options like business management, law, engineering etc. remains to be seen.As of now, the role, scope and guidelines for foreign universities wanting to come to India remain unclear, particularly to students aspiring for quality higher education. In this context, the Foreign Institutions Entry Bill, which is due to be presented to Parliament, is timely and much needed. The bill is essentially regulatory in nature and seeks to set conditions, boundaries and guidelines for the entry of foreign educators.LegislationWhile most guidelines are straightforward, two mandatory conditions that will make any highly reputed foreign institution frown are: (a) “The foreign university has to maintain a corpus fund of a minimum of Rs 50 crore. Maximum of 75 per cent of any income generated from the fund shall be utilised for developing the institution in India and the rest should be reinvested in the fund and (b) Any surplus in revenue generated in India by the foreign university has to be invested in the development of the educational institution established by it in India.”Why would any decent foreign educator like to come to India, at least independently? More so in present times when most well known foreign universities are finding it difficult to run their “business” of providing quality education in their own countries. The costs of higher education, for example in UK and USA, have increased alarmingly, and these universities have increasingly resorted to shorter duration courses for higher studies, largely diluting the whole idea of quality education within a university set up. But getting back to the bill, the question remains: why will a highly ranked foreign educator, which cannot make, and take, money out of India, come here in the first place?As a regulatory bill, this is a good one, particularly for the benefit of eager students and parents. It tries to ensure that incoming foreign educators have appropriate credentials, and that all relevant information regarding the nature of courses, faculty, fees, infrastructure, nature of collaboration, entry process etc. is transparently and easily available to all; for the first time, it will also be clear to the foreign educators as to what is required on their part, and what they can expect. The bill should be welcomed by all stakeholders involved in the pursuit of higher education.advertisementHowever, the sheer scale of the demand should be a scary thought for all. The regulators are only as good as they choose to be. There are several regulatory bodies, existing for a long time, whose job is to ensure the quality and transparency of higher education and how well they have performed is not hidden from anyone, particularly in the case of private Indian institutions. While the present bill is aimed at foreign educators coming to India, there is an urgent need for making it mandatory and ensuring that all private institutions in India provide adequate infrastructure and the details that are being asked from the incoming foreign educator.QualityWhat about the quality of higher education? The bill is largely silent on the issue, and rather vaguely mentions that “quality” should be maintained. This however is an important issue, equally valid for the foreign educator as well as Indian institutions, public or private. It is often said that studying at world class institutions such as Oxford, Cambridge, Harvard, Yale, Cornell, to name a few, is an experience in itself. In fact, it is. It is not only the environment, quality of teaching, quality of coherent students, robust research culture etc but also several other facilities and structures like organised sports, music, theatre, debates, university clubs and entertainment facilities that make for essential ingredients of quality education.Good quality education is expected to provide the recipient with knowledge, analytical skills, ability to think independently, an appetite for deeper inquiry in the subject and equip one with tools and methodology to address different questions. In addition, while quality education readies one for taking up a variety of jobs, it is also expected to inculcate flexibility in thoughts and the ability to appreciate opinions different from one’s own.What is the quality of higher education in Indian teaching institutions, public or private? While some of the well known universities (a generous estimate of thirty or so) can claim a reasonable standard of education, these standards decline rapidly. Higher education in the university has suffered from continuous criminal neglect for a long time, and that simply cannot be addressed in a short period of time; such repairs are necessarily long drawn processes.Can quality in education be transplanted? In principle the answer has to be yes. But in practice, it would require persistent and careful attention. My own hunch is that we will see the presence of foreign educators in areas like engineering (B.Tech, M.Tech), law, pharmacy, biotechnology, management studies, areas already invaded with missionary zeal by private education providers in India. Will their collaboration with foreign players produce better quality? It is the Indian government which will have to invest heavily and continuously in higher education in areas like the humanities, fine arts, basic science and it is good that after decades of neglect higher education is on the radar as far as human resource development is concerned.advertisementThe writer is Director, International Centre for Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology, New Delhilast_img read more