VOODOO VENUE WEEKEND PICTURE SPECIAL: HAVE YOU JUST WON FREE VIP ENTRY WITH CHAMPAGNE RECEPTION?

first_imgWhat another brilliant weekend club revellers had at Donegal’s No.1 nightspot Voodoo Venue.Huge crowds descended on the venue on both Friday and Saturday night.The innovative management at Voodoo are always seeking to ensure every weekend in the club is a memorable one for its loyal customers. Their desire to always meet and exceed customer expectations ensure it remains the No.1 clubbing venue in the North-West.Every week in conjunction with Donegal Daily, Voodoo Venue run a picture special competition on the site.If your face is circled in the picture special above, then you’ve just won FREE Champagne and FREE VIP entry for four.Contact Voodoo via Facebook and claim your prize now. 🙂 Make sure and check out their Facebook page below for details of their brilliant student night HIJACKED TUESDAYS.https://www.facebook.com/VOOD00venueletterkenny VOODOO VENUE WEEKEND PICTURE SPECIAL: HAVE YOU JUST WON FREE VIP ENTRY WITH CHAMPAGNE RECEPTION? was last modified: December 8th, 2014 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:EntertainmentFeaturesnewspicture specialVoodoo Venuelast_img read more

Cricket’s two hottest teams set for battle

first_img11 February 2014The two hottest teams in test cricket, South Africa and Australia, do battle from Wednesday at SuperSport Park in Centurion, in the first of three tests. The Proteas are ranked number one in the world, while the Aussies are coming off a rampant 5-0 whitewash of England.While South Africa have won successive series Down Under, they have not yet beaten Australia at home since the Proteas were readmitted to world cricket in 1992.‘Motivation’At SuperSport Park on Monday, star batsman Hashim Amla spoke about the Proteas’ home record against Australia. “There is probably some motivation, but in another aspect I don’t think we want to play too much on it,” he said.“In the last few series that we have played against Australia, we have had success, so hopefully we can translate the success into a home series win.”Seeking a return to formWhen the teams last met at the WACA in Perth in December 2012, Amla struck a superb, man of the match-winning 196 in South Africa’s second innings to help the Proteas to a series-clinching 309 run victory. After a poor series against India, he is ranked fourth in the test batting rankings, but will be aiming to return to his established form, especially in the absence of Jacques Kallis.AB de Villiers, meanwhile, returns to the team after being sidelined because of surgery on a hand. He, too, will look to pick up where he left off. De Villiers is currently the number one test batsman in the world.Same approach“We have played against Australia quite a few times over the last few years and against the same bowling attack. I don’t think it will be any different for us in the way we approach this test series,” Amla said of the challenge awaiting the Proteas.“The guys have been going about their business preparing as well as they can.”Number fourOne of the biggest changes to the South African team will not involve a new player, but a new position in the batting line-up, with Faf du Plessis taking over the important number four spot from the great Jacques Kallis.Batting lower down the order, Du Plessis, in only 11 tests, has been superb, scoring 782 runs at an average of 60.15. Already he has played two memorable century knocks, one to save the second test against Australia the last time the teams met in Australia, and the other that almost won South Africa the first test against India earlier this year, when the Proteas were chasing a massive 458 for victory.The question that needs to be answered is whether or not he can be an attacking force higher up the order, if attack is what is needed.Combined what that, how will the all-round contribution of Kallis be accounted for in the bowling attack?ConditionsFor Amla, the conditions will play a vital role in the outcome of the first test. “I think conditions will be the deciding factor,” Amla said. “Regardless of the conditions, every batsman tries to occupy the crease and score as many runs as possible. Both teams are quite attacking, but by the same token conditions will play a large role in deciding how the game goes forward.”last_img read more

Community Development

first_imgHi my name is Smanga iam the director for a company named Mphakathi Recyclers. The company is a start up which aims at not only employing the youth but also to give people a means of generating an income through recyclables. The following Document was compiled by me can you please reply to it with feedback on how I can get it running because I have faced many difficulties when I try getting it off the ground. MPHAKATHI RECYCLERS (Pty)Ltd ‘It’s only trash if you throw it away’ Registration number: 2015/165488/07 Postal Address : 642a Ntombela Street White City Jabavu Soweto, Gauteng 1868 Contact Person : Mr Smanga Mthembu Email : Smanga Mthembu3@gmail.com Cell phone : 063 394 8170 Director : Mr Smanga Mthembu Signature : THE BUSINESS 1.1 BUSINESS DESCRIPTION UMPHAKATHI RECYCLERS (Pty) Ltd is a recyclable collecting business based in Schools around Soweto. The business mainly collects (but is not limited to) Plastic bottles, Glass bottles, Paper and cans recyclables for a profit by selling it Buy-Back-Centres or ‘Depots’. To conduct business UMPHAKATHI RECYCLERS (Pty) Ltd must be in contract or agreement with local schools for ‘product and service’ relationship that aims at uplifting the community and create means for income and also offer relief to poor or struggling families. The main product or service offered by the entity is a Burial Scheme. If the local school is contracted with UMPHAKATHI RECYCLERS (Pty) Ltd and the children at the school bring any of the above mentioned recyclables to school with them on a daily basis (weekdays) then the entity is obligated to assist with the burial of a parent or guardian at no fee at all. The entity will immediately provide the following: • Tables • Chairs • A Tent • Gas Stoves • Pots and Plates • Sound system (If required) This will half the cost of the funeral for the remaining family members, allowing the parent or guardian a dignified funeral which is very important in the African tradition when it comes to bereavement. All this because their child took what is considered ‘trash’ to school. 1.2 GOALS FOR THE BUSINESS In order for UMPHAKATHI RECYCLERS (Pty) Ltd to be sustainable the following goals must be met: • Six months Be in contract with at least one school in Soweto with about +/-1500 pupils • Twelve months Be in contract with at least 4 schools in Soweto, each with +/-1500 multiply by four equals +6000 pupils. If each of these pupils comes with at least two 2L plastic bottles or two old magazines/books or five times 330/440ml cans or and two 375ml glass bottles for the initiative. • Three years Be in contract with at least 20+ schools in Soweto, each with +1500 pupils multiply by twenty (or more) equals +30000 pupils. . If each of these pupils comes with at least two 2L plastic bottles or two old magazines/books or five times 330/440ml cans or and two 375ml glass bottles for the initiative. Please note that the above is only estimates as the success of the project could accelerate at a rate much faster than the predicted ones. 1.3 THE MARKET Currently the market for recyclables is dominated by plastic recyclables. MPHAKATHI RECYCLERS (Pty) Ltd will also collect these plastic bottles, but is not limited as such the less dominated markets in recycling such as cans, paper and glass bottles will be targeted. The market can be better explained through the SWOT ANALYSIS. • STRENGHTS 1. We will collect materials which have not been not been collected on a large scale 2. We will employ unemployed youth in Soweto (community upliftment) and create opportunities for self-employment 3. The initiative will reduce pollution bringing down our carbon-footprint 4. The financial burden of burying a loved one will be greatly reduced if the child is in a school contracted with MPHAKATHI RECYCLERS. 5. Where the family cannot afford a donation will be offered if all the stake-holders agree on it 6. The only condition is that all monies from recycled products is deposited to the entities bank account 7. It’s a community effort and community empowerment opportunities will follow naturally by giving a lifeline to the poor or even child headed households. 8. Children will learn the importance of recycling and its benefits for our environments (sustainability) 9. The project is a niche’ • WEAKNESS 1. The business is a start-up: Funding, Marketing, Advertising, Vehicles etc. these are all essential for the success of the entity. 2. Other Competitors are already recycling on a large scale (Pik’it’Up) • OPPORTUNITY The opportunity for growth and sustainability is apparent because when other schools and parents get word of what MPHAKATHI RECYCLERS (Pty) Ltd is offering to them as a service, they will want to join as they know how important it is to bury a loved one with dignity in African community. The more schools join the more revenue MPHAKATHI RECYCLERS can generate through these recyclables, thus extending its reach and growing the enterprise. In a matter of years we would have surpassed our competitors with the help of the community and schools. The thought of relief for parents knowing that when they pass away his/her children in primary schools will be able to bury them with ease and dignity all the because they assisted them by giving them recyclables to take to school. • THREATHS Legislation on recycling regulates on how much waste can be recycled at a particular site due to the health hazards associated with the accumulation of waste. Since MPHAKATHI RECYCLERS will be operating from schools material to be must always be kept at an absolute minimum. 1. Start-Up Costs 1.1 Material Needed • Bulk Bags> Not yet available • Containers> Not yet available • Banners> Not yet available • Tents> Available • Chairs> Available • Gas Stoves> Available • Pots> Available • Décor> Available • Protective Gear> Not yet available • Vehicles> To be hired MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING MPHAKATHI RECYCLERS (Pty) Ltd is a recycling collecting business that aims to recycle cans, glass bottles, paper and plastic bottles for a profit by selling the mentioned recyclables to Buy-Back-Centres for revenue. The above mentioned recyclables have to be provided by the pupils in the school for our service (Burial Scheme) in case death occurs to a parent or guardian. This Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) is an agreement between MPHAKATHI RECYCLERS (Pty) Ltd reg no. 2015/165488/07 and Primary school for the above mentioned service in exchange for recyclables mentioned above. Director : Mr Smanga Mthembu Signature Name of School : Principal/Deputy Signature : School Stamp :last_img read more

The oratory of Oliver Tambo: Ngoako Ramatlhodi on Oliver Tambo

first_imgRamatlhodi was the ANC president’s speechwriter. He recalls a sharp dresser who was meticulous in his attention to detail and unwaveringly dedicated to liberation.Ngoako Ramatlhodi remembers Oliver Tambo as meticulous, in dress and turn of phrase. (Image: Ngoako Ramatlhodi)Amukelani ChaukeThe late struggle stalwart Oliver Reginald Tambo was a perfectionist – he was so thorough and meticulous that in the late 1980s and early 1990s, he would make his speechwriters rewrite drafts until he was satisfied.In some instances, he would end up only reading the opening paragraphs of the speech and deliver the remainder of his address off-the-cuff.Before the era of computers, former public service and administration minister advocate Ngoako Ramatlhodi, who was a youth activist in his thirties at the time, was appointed speechwriter to the then exiled ANC president at a time when political parties were banned.Between 1987 and 1993 – during which time Tambo’s health took its toll following a stroke in the mid-1980s – Ramatlhodi, who had gained much political insight through his work in youth structures in exile, grew close to Tambo.The president was navigating sensitive political terrain while South Africa was on a knife’s edge and was on the verge of opening negotiations that would dismantle the apartheid regime.In an interview Ramatlhodi said that looking back on that period, writing for a selfless, great struggle stalwart such as Tambo was at times challenging and in some instances, very insightful.The advocate was part of a committee in the Presidency with veteran struggle stalwarts Jack Simons, Edwin Mabitse (real name Edward Mabitsela) and the first Speaker of the democratic parliament Frene Ginwala, who was based in London.“The two of us [Ramatlhodi and Mabitse] were made the president’s speech writers and secretaries and then we formed a committee in the Presidency with Jack Simons.“[We] would be faced with typewriters on a daily basis and the old man was a perfectionist – he would mark us red – there were no computers in those days. So if it is marked red, that means you are going to start afresh on the typewriter all over again.“But he would give us work quite ahead of time. Let’s say he was going to make a speech in May, he would then say a month before we should start drafting that speech, or a month and a half before. Then we kept on taking the drafts to him and he looks at them, asks you questions like ‘Do you understand what you are saying? Do you think the president of the ANC would say this like that?’“If you were properly dressed he would take off his glasses and say: ‘You look so smart.” (Image: Brand South Africa)“Then he puts you back in line and says I think you should articulate this thing this way and this way. And you would go and do a rewrite,” he said.In February, President Jacob Zuma declared 2017 the year of OR Tambo to recognise the struggle stalwart’s contribution to the liberation struggle. Ramatlhodi said Tambo was “a patriot” who cared about language.“He knew the politics, he had the content… He was very passionate about the liberation of our people and even in hard times, when he [fell ill] before 1985, he had a stroke and then we went to this conference in… Zambia and there he said ‘My body is weak; it is limping. But what remains of it shall be consumed in the struggle.’“He was definitely clear that he was going to fall with his boots on and I think that is what happened.”The rise of OR TamboBorn on 27 October 1917 in Kantilla, Bizana, in Mpondoland in the Eastern Cape, Tambo ran an attorney’s practice with Nelson Mandela in central Johannesburg in 1951 before Mandela was banned. This was after he joined the ANC in 1940.In 1953, Tambo’s profile as an anti-apartheid activist rose and he replaced the then national secretary, Walter Sisulu, who had been banned by the government for his role in the 1952 Defiance Campaign. In 1957, Tambo was elected deputy president of the ANC.Subsequent to the Sharpeville Massacre on 21 March 1960, Tambo embarked on a Mission in Exile to gain international support for the South African liberation movement. He became ANC president in 1969, a position he kept until 1991, making him the longest-serving president of the ANC.Ramatlhodi handed the penIn the late 1980s he recruited Ramatlhodi as his private secretary and speechwriter. At the time, Ramatlhodi was head of the ANC’s Regional Political and Military Council of the Zimbabwe Mission. He had spent time in Lesotho, where he was the student representative council (SRC) president at the National University of Lesotho. Former Reserve Bank governor Tito Mboweni was the secretary responsible for publicity in the same student body.Usually, Ramatlhodi would travel to Angola for military training and return to Lesotho to continue his studies. But on one occasion, he was told to go to Lusaka in Zambia because he “was needed” there.He was taken to the ANC’s headquarters in exile, where the liberation movement’s top officials were waiting for him, as was Mboweni.Ramatlhodi and Mboweni were briefed about what has taking place in Lesotho. Times were tense: the South African Defence Force had massacred ANC members in Lesotho, Botswana and Mozambique.Their appointment as envoys was mainly the result of the access they had to frontline leaders and ministers, including the prime minister of Lesotho at the time, through their SRC positions.Ramatlhodi was later deported from Lesotho and was sent to Russia. There, he did military combat work and on his return to Africa, he was put in charge of the council in the Zimbabwe Mission, when the ANC was devising a strategy to start negotiations with the apartheid regime.In 1987, he was appointed speechwriter to Tambo and formed part of the team that went on to draft the Harare Declaration.The Constitutional PrinciplesRamatlhodi said one of the most important documents he wrote under Tambo’s watch was the Constitutional Principles, which he co-drafted under the ANC Constitutional Committee to define a debate on the country’s new constitution.“We used to write [a lot of documents] but one of them had to do with the conditions for negotiations, which was a statement issued by the ANC on the conditions of negotiations, release of political prisoners, the unbanning of political organisations, all those things.“There are many, many documents that I wrote. For example, the Constitutional Principles of the region, which I participated in even when I was in Harare.”The Harare DeclarationIn 1989, Ramatlhodi was part of the team that drafted the liberation movement’s Harare Declaration, a historic paper that laid the basis for negotiations between the apartheid regime and the liberation movement.He said this was one of the most important pieces of writing that he was part of as Tambo’s speechwriter.“When we were drafting the Harare Declaration in 1989, we did a tour of the frontline seat – …Tanzania, Zimbabwe… for a week.“What happened was we wrote a draft… and sent it to people in South Africa and the neighbouring states for their comment and then we followed up to engage with the authorities so that they made their inputs into the final outcome of that document.”After the roadshow, they returned to Luanda in Angola to draft the final document before proceeding to Lusaka. In the group was former president Thabo Mbeki; ANC strategist and former head of policy and in the co-ordinating advisory unit in the Presidency Joel Netshitendzhe; intellectual and activist Pallo Jordan, former member of parliament and minister; and former justice minister Penuell Maduna.Ramatlhodi said Tambo was of the opinion that the document underemphasised the role of the armed struggle in the liberation war. He instructed Ramatlhodi to return to the team and raise the view as his own.“That’s Oliver Tambo for you. He did not want it to come from him because they would easily be persuaded because the president said so. So I had to go argue on that point on his behalf. So it illustrates the point that he was not self-imposing,” he said.The stroke and the comeback speechTambo suffered a mild stroke in 1981; eight years later, on 9 August 1989, he suffered a more severe stroke in Lusaka and was rushed to London. During his recovery, Ramatlhodi was sent to the British capital to help him regain his speech, as Tambo was only comfortable with people familiar to him.“Towards December that year the ANC was going to have a conference in South Africa, so I went back to help him regain his speech because he was comfortable with familiar surroundings.“We prepared the speech, which was a comeback speech, after 27 years, and he delivered it at the ANC conference at Nasrec, which was the first legal ANC conference in South Africa since 1960.“I showed him that speech on the machine manually. But the good thing about him – he was a fighter – by the time he returned [to South Africa], he was reading the speech. And he made many other speeches across the country subsequently,” said Ramatlhodi, who was 39 at the time.This followed then state president FW de Klerk unbanning all anti-apartheid political parties in February 1990, paving the way for negotiations that would end apartheid.Tambo delivered the speech on 16 December 1990 at a rally following the close of the ANC elective conference. It was at this gathering that Mandela was elected Tambo’s deputy president.In his speech, Tambo said: “South Africa is at the crossroads. Our struggle, complemented by efforts of the international community, has rendered apartheid unworkable. Thus, those who rule us without our consent have been compelled to accept the humanity of a black person in this country. For the first time in a period of 70 years, the legitimate aspirations of the overwhelming majority of our people have possibilities of being realised.”Tambo made several more speeches written by Ramatlhodi and at the ANC’s 48th National Conference in Durban in July 1991, he delivered what seemed to be a farewell speech in his opening address. He later told delegates of his intention to step down, urging them to support Mandela as his successor.After he declined a nomination to be president again, delegates created the national chairperson position in honour of Tambo.In the early hours of 24 April 1993, Tambo suffered his third and fatal stroke – two weeks after the assassination of Chris Hani, then leader of the SA Communist Party and Umkhonto we Sizwe chief of staff.Tambo the smart dresserRamatlhodi said while it was usually all hard work and putting pen to paper to craft speeches and document what would later become the liberation movement’s most-prized possessions, he remembered an ANC president who was a smart dresser.“He loved his clothes. And he wanted us to dress very well. If you were shabbily dressed he would look at you and [ask] ‘Ngoako, don’t you have clothes?’“I remember on one trip [during] the Harare Declaration, I don’t think I had enough suits with me. He called the late Stanley Mabizela and said ‘Take this man to town and buy him clothes.’ He gave him money. I got about three nice suits that day.“If you were properly dressed he would take off his glasses and say: ‘You look so smart.’”One of Ramatlhodi’s favourite phrases from the speeches he wrote was “United in our diversity”.“That line comes from a paragraph in our speech where we say: ‘We seek to create a united, democratic and non-racial society. We have a vision of a South Africa in which black and white shall live and work together as equals in conditions of peace and prosperity.’ Tambo made this speech at Georgetown University in Washington, DC on 27 January 1987. At this time, South Africa was at the height of the armed struggle.”Following his time as Tambo’s speechwriter, Ramatlhodi stayed on in the office of the Presidency when Mandela for about six months after Mandela took over. This was while Mandela, affectionately known as Madiba, embarked on a world tour as ANC president.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more