19 End Training in Video Journalism

first_imgMr. and Mrs. Jomo Stubblefield (rear) with workshop participants at the end of the training At least nineteen (19) young journalists ended a one-day video reporting and editing workshop in Paynesville last Wednesday, July 12. The training, facilitated by Mr. Jomo Stubblefield, an award-winning Liberian video journalist based in Washington, D.C. (USA), brought together reporters from the Daily Observer and Nubian FM.Mr. Stubblefield works for DCW50, a television station in Washington, D.C.The training provided the reporters with hands-on camera training, editing, and tips for producing quality video either with a flip cam, smartphone or more sophisticated video cameras. Stubblefield conducted the training in two parts: a class session held in the Stanton B. Peabody Memorial Library at the Daily Observer office and a field session at the ELWA Junction.According to him, the way journalists used to report news for the public has transitioned, especially with the availability of new technologies. Therefore, in order for journalists to report breaking news for their media outlets, they need to make use of iPhones or smartphones, to enable them to report efficiently.  Smartphones and tablets with high-definition screens have enabled viewers to watch videos anywhere, he noted.“Apps and simple editing software such as Final Cut Pro X has lowered barriers to content creation. At the same time, bandwidth has become cheaper and more plentiful with the cost of mobile data plans falling in many countries,” said Stubblefield.Mr. Stubblefield challenged the journalists to build on the foundation of the craft by adding new media skills to their repertoires. “Today’s multimedia journalists need to possess strong writing skills and know how to use multimedia tools and software and be able to assess the multimedia potential of stories and determine which story forms are most appropriate. He explained that video journalists always need to pay attention to soundbites as well as focus on a particular scene because it helps relay the emotive content of the story to viewers.“We don’t have a growing generation of readers, but viewers. The sooner your video is uploaded to your website the faster you get your audience informed on current events. Video editing journalism makes it easier to get your audience to view your news in time. You don’t have to wait till the next day after writing your story to get it published in print,” he said.The workshop was done free of charge by Mr. as his way of giving back to Liberia and to the profession that became his passion. A sumptuous surprise lunch for the participants was prepared by Mrs. Stubblefield. The participants applauded Mr. Stubblefield for their willingness to sacrifice their to time to train young, aspiring journalists in multimedia storytelling, and gowned him.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

NASA gets OK to park jets at Palmdale airport

first_imgThe 20-year lease requires NASA to pay more than $1.4 million annually to rent Hangar 703, a 422,000-square-foot building that once served as a home to Rockwell International and the B-1 bomber aircraft, according to a report submitted by Los Angeles World Airports, the agency that operates the airport. From staff reports The nation’s largest flying observatory and other aircraft used by NASA for scientific experiments will soon be housed at LA/Palmdale Airport under a proposal approved Monday by the Los Angeles airport commission. NASA’s Dryden Flight Research Center will move some of its operations to the Antelope Valley airport, which will eventually be home to the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, a 747 jetliner armed with a giant telescope that gazes at the solar system. Modified versions of the ER-2, Gulfstream III and DC-8 jetliners will also be housed at the airport to conduct Earth and environmental studies, according to NASA officials. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more