A’s takeaways: Phegley’s night to remember, bats finally break out

first_imgJosh Phegley had trouble hearing the first question of his postgame media scrum late Friday night, the result of some sort of ear problem that’s been bugging him.Phegley isn’t alone in struggling to comprehend whatever the heck it was that transpired at PNC Park, as the Athletics crushed the Pirates, 14-1, and Phegley had a game for the ages.Oakland’s No. 8 hitter had seven RBIs by the fourth inning and finished with eight after he smacked a solo home run in the ninth inning. The 14 runs the …last_img read more

Raiders beat Chargers in prime time finale at Coliseum

first_imgOAKLAND — Josh Jacobs scored on an 18-yard run with 1:02 to play and the Raiders gave their late-night fans something to remember them by in a 26-24 win over the Los Angeles Chargers at the Coliseum.The last prime time game in Oakland ended when Karl Joseph made a leaping interception of a Philip Rivers pass — the last one a familiar rival will throw in a venue where he came in with a 9-4 career record. It touched off a celebration which found coach Jon Gruden making his way to the Black …last_img read more

Brand South Africa: year in review 2017

first_imgIt has been a storied year for the country, and for Brand South Africa. It started with a new chair at the African Union and passed many milestones along the way: from the deaths of musicians to the growth of women in an entrepreneurial world, among others, all underscored by the celebration of the centenary of the birth of OR Tambo.Buhle Mthethwa started writing The Big Fat Naughty Cat when she was nine years old. (Image supplied)Brand South Africa reporterAs always, it has been an interesting year in South Africa, one of uplift and some hardship. It has been a year of new beginnings and renewals, as well as endings. It’s been a year in which we have celebrated female entrepreneurs, children have embraced the digital world and we have all rejoiced as South African films and actors have made an impression internationally.We look back at the some of the stories that shaped 2017.The year began with change, with Chadian Foreign Minister Moussa Faki Mahamat replacing South Africa’s Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma as the chairperson of the African Union. We also took time out to introduce South Africa to The Skyscrapers, a Cape Town trio of pre-teen musicians taking South Africa by storm with their catchy pop music.January ended with the sad news of the death of South African gospel star Lundi Tyamara. His life, filled with tragedy and struggle, inspired the fans of the prince of South African gospel.Lundi Tyamara was one of the biggest selling gospel artists in South Africa, selling over 3 million albums. Tyamara died, aged 38, on 27 January 2017. (Image: Gallo Music)In February, we celebrated female entrepreneurs changing the face of their sectors. Mosibudi Makgato and Rosemary Padi’s YaMama Ginger Beer is winning fans looking for a truly African take on an old favourite.Mosibudi Makgato and Rosemary Padi, founders of YaMama Gemmer, want to distribute their traditional ginger beer internationally. “Our product must be something that is on tourists’ list to get whenever they come to South Africa.” (Image: Melissa Javan)In the traditionally white and male mining sector, Daphne Mashile-Nkosi continued to break new ground for women.March was a month of news good and sad for South Africa. We crowned a new Miss SA, who went on to win the Miss Universe crown in November. Route 62, the drive from Cape Town to Oudtshoorn, was also named the best and most scenic roadtrip in the world by CNN Travel.Miss South Africa Demi-Leigh Nel-Peters is crowned Miss Universe in Las Vegas on 27 November 2017. (Image: Miss Universe website)It was also the month in which we said goodbye to two people who changed the world in their own inherent way. Early in the month, celebrated actor Joe Mafela was killed in a road accident, and the month ended with the death of former Rivonia trialist and anti-apartheid struggle veteran Ahmed Kathrada.Freedom Day came in April, a time to reflect on how far we had come as a nation and to celebrate those who helped its birth. We celebrated the lesser known heroes of our liberation, as well as pioneering medical researcher, Dr Glenda Gray, showing the world our good story.The more things change the more they stay the same. In May, we visited two education initiatives that celebrate old and new South Africa. In Umlazi, eThekwini, NPO Codemakers began a project to help learners understand computer programme coding. May is also Africa Month, and we celebrated the first batch of North West University indigenous knowledge systems graduates. The dancers went on to win international acclaim later in the year, but in May we attended the ATKV Riel Dance Competition.The RooiRots Riel Dancers from Elizabethfontein.In June, we met some of the  most inspiring people in the country. From a youthful neurosurgeon to an urban farmer and entrepreneur changing his community using the humble vegetable, spinach, as well as a grandmother showing young explorers the beauty of Africa, we discovered them.Entrepreneur Lufefe Nomjana (Image: Spinach King / Espinaca Innovations)However, whatever else was happening in June, the country came to a standstill for the Comrades Marathon.As did the rest of the world, the following month South Africans celebrated the legacy of Nelson Mandela by devoting 67 minutes of their day to give back in his name. This year, Brand South Africa joined the men’s national hockey team volunteering at the New Jerusalem Children’s Home in Johannesburg.Inxeba, also known as The Wound, had its African premiere at the 38th Durban International Film Festival in July. It opens in South African theatres in February 2017. (Image: YouTube)We celebrated the success of isiXhosa movie Inxeba, which movingly explores the conflict of traditional rites of manhood, when initiates “go to the mountain”, with awakening pride in gay identity. And we cheered the success of the women-led Social Coding programme, initiatives to teach girls about coding and inspire them to become innovators. In July, Unesco’s World Heritage Committee also took the decision to list ǂKhomani Cultural Landscape as a world heritage site.The ǂKhomani Cultural Landscape is inscribed as a world heritage site in July 2017. (Image: Francois Odendaal Productions, via Unesco)Sadly, legendary South African guitarist Ray Phiri died of cancer at the age of 70.Ray Phiri was best known for his work with the legendary South African band Stimela and his collaborations with US singer Paul Simon. The self-taught guitarist and singer died in Nelspruit, Mpumalanga, on 12 July 2017, following a battle with lung cancer. (Image: Wikipedia)In August, Brand South Africa launched its new Play Your Part television series. Broadcast weekly on SABC2, it explores active citizenship in South Africa. Once more women led the way as entrepreneurs and educators. Pretoria honey maker and bee keeper Mokgadi Mabela brought honey to South African homes while delegates at the Top Women Conference made it clear that women needed to lead the digital economy.Of heroes, in KwaZulu-Natal they used a new global positioning app to bring medical services to townships and a new fictional superhero was born in Lagos.A panel from the forthcoming Blessing In Disguise Marvel comic book, featuring Ngozi, a Nigerian girl coming to grips with her new superpowers. The title was written by acclaimed science fiction writer Nnedi Okorafor. (Image: Marvel Comics)Global South Africans did the country proud through September. Comedian Trevor Noah won an entertainment Emmy for his work on The Daily Show and singer Toya Delazy became the voice of the fourth Powerpuff Girl. Town planner Mthobisi Masinga was invited to present his innovative research on rural land development at the International Society for City and Regional Planners’ Annual Congress in Portland, while chef Nompumelelo Mqwebu’s new cookbook, Through The Eyes of an African Chef, proved successful at the Frankfurt Book Fair.Dr Meneses-Turino at work saving lives in Nepal. (Image: Gift of the Givers)Also in September, world-renowned South African humanitarian organisation Gift of the Givers quietly celebrated its 25th anniversary.In this, the centenary of the birth of Oliver Reginald Tambo, South Africa feted the statesman by unveiling a statue in his honour at OR Tambo International Airport. We also remembered the stirring oratory he brought to the liberation struggle.To honour the memory of late ANC president Oliver Tambo, a statue is unveiled at OR Tambo International Airport in Johannesburg on 19 October 2017, which was declared the Year of OR Tambo by the national government. (Image: Tambo Foundation, Twitter)Brand South Africa was also recognised internationally through its nomination for a 2017 City Nation Place Awards in the Best Expression of Place Identity through Design category. With great stories to tell, such as commemorating Lucky Dube or acknowledging Ponte Tower’s place in architectural history, was it really that much of a surprise?Lucky Dube was one of South Africa’s best known and most successful musicians. He died on 18 October 2007. (Image: Gallo Music South Africa)The agency celebrates the power of South Africans busy changing their world in big and small ways. In November, we lionised Nisha Varghese, an East London woman with cerebal palsy who works to help children born with clubfoot, and chef Chantel Dartnall, the best female chef in the world for 2017 and the only South African listed in the world’s top 100 chefs.Nisha Varghese has an online campaign to raise money for at least 50 children who are born with clubfoot to get treatment. Varghese with her mother, Anne, and Play Your Part ambassador Catherine Constantinides (right). (Images supplied)November was also set aside to celebrate entrepreneurs through the South African Premier Business Awards and the Top 20 Small Business and Entrepreneurship Awards.We saved the most heartwarming story for last: in December, we spoke to Buhle Mthethwa, a 10-year-old girl on a mission to instil a culture of reading in her peers, one book at a time, starting with her own, The Big Fat Naughty Cat.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

Only Perfect Practice Makes Perfect

first_img Essential Reading! Get my first book: The Only Sale Guide You’ll Ever Need “The USA Today bestseller by the star sales speaker and author of The Sales Blog that reveals how all salespeople can attain huge sales success through strategies backed by extensive research and experience.” Buy Now Practice doesn’t make perfect. Perfect practice makes perfect.For a couple of years, I practiced Aikido, a very nuanced martial art, and one based on the premise that anyone who would attack you was already seriously troubled and deserved your compassion. O’Sensei made some connection with the Universe and created a way to protect yourself while also protecting the person trying to harm you. O’Sensei based a lot of the forms on jiu-jitsu, another form of self-protection that stops short of seriously hurting the person trying to do you harm.If you have never seen Aikido practiced, it is a spectacularly beautiful, with big sweeping motions, made even more alluring by the traditional Japanese hakama. There are only 39 forms in the art, and they are challenging, mostly because they are counterintuitive. Sometimes you step into your attacker, and other times, you turn backward away from them, when your instinct would have you do something different.Avoiding Novelties and DistractionsMy Sensei was an excellent practitioner and teacher. However, he isn’t the one who mainly taught me the Aikido I learned in the dojo. It was the black belts I chose to work with that taught me everything I learned. The Sensei was always on the lookout for novelties, and when something caught his eye, he would stop us from continuing on some form so we could explore something he found to be useful. In the course of 90 minutes, we would practice a lot of different forms and explore many novelties.A lot of advanced practitioners enjoyed the novelties, but my interest was burning in the forms. To Hell with the novelties, I thought. To ensure I had the time to work on forms, I would get to the dojo a half hour early to practice the forms with a black belt or a third-degree black belt (san dan). I would stay a half hour late to drill the forms after most students had left, always working with people of the highest rank, who not only had a different feel but who were also happy to do the same form over and over.Burn It InThe high ranking students were impressed with the fact that I was willing to do the same form for a half hour straight, never suggesting that I be shown a new form, and never looking for any novelty. All I wanted was a chance to drill the same pattern, to master it. You can understand the forms without your body being able to perform them. I wanted to be able to do them without having to think about it, something that would slow your response should you ever have needed to defend yourself.One day, I was going through the six forms that would be required for the test to gain the first rank when the Sensei walked by. He watched me practice with a third-degree black belt go through all the forms, and then he said, “You are taking your test on Saturday.” When he walked away, my training partner said, “You just passed your test.” The Sensei had seen enough.The Power of Perfect PracticeWhen new students joined the dojo, many of them believed me to have a much higher rank than I had attained. Because I practiced with people far more skilled, and because I tried my best to model their example, I felt different to them than other students. I was mimicking people with far greater experience and skill, one of the best and fastest ways to gain competency.It is difficult to really know something if you don’t drill it. If you don’t rehearse, your performance will not be what it might have been had you done so. You can know something intellectually without really knowing it. You have to get it into your body.In human endeavors where skills differentiate the performance of one person from another, a professional from an amateur or a student from a master, the difference is found in the practice, the rehearsal, and the drills. It is not, however, just the time spent practicing, but also how you practice and the intensity of your focus.Focus on the FundamentalsIn any area in which you want to achieve mastery, your time and energy are best spent on practicing, rehearsing, and drilling the fundamentals. What makes one a master of their craft is their willingness to persist in mastering the fundamentals, developing a competency by going over the same ground without losing interest or enthusiasm. You gain mastery by ignoring the novelties until you have mastered the fundamentals. Only after you have mastered the fundamentals can you look for innovations and variations on the theme. (You can find the 17 fundamentals of B2B Sales in The Only Sales Guide You’ll Ever Need)Learn Anthony’s core strategies & tactics for sales success at any level with The Only Sales Guide You’ll Ever NeedIf you are not drilling the fundamentals, you are not on the path to mastery. Perfect practice is what makes perfect, and perfect practice means drilling the fundamentals.last_img read more

CJ Perez powers Pirates

first_imgCJ Perez. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/ INQUIRER.netLyceum brandished its newfound depth even as Mapua showed it can survive without that same amount of firepower.With CJ Perez dishing out an all-around game in his first NCAA game in three seasons, the Pirates justified the preseason hype with a 96-75 beating of contender Jose Rizal U Tuesday in the Season 93 men’s basketball tournament at Filoil Flying V Centre.ADVERTISEMENT Pagasa: Storm intensifies as it nears PAR LOOK: Jane De Leon meets fellow ‘Darna’ Marian Rivera Meanwhile, the NCAA Management Committee immediately overturned Perpetual Help’s 69-65 victory over St. Benilde after the Altas showed up with the wrong uniform in their season debut.Tipoff for the noontime clash was delayed for close to an hour before the league decided to push through with the game since both teams wore dark jerseys, which was only designated for the Blazers.Perpetual Help also forfeited its game in the juniors division to St. Benilde-La Salle Greenhills, which still won the game, 64-60. Gilas gets break: Iran resting Haddadi El Nido residents told to vacate beach homes Another vape smoker nabbed in Lucena LATEST STORIES Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Pagasa: Kammuri now a typhoon, may enter PAR by weekend “We try to stay in the moment. You always try to get better. We’re gonna be up against the number one team after this game. We’re just excited and glad that we got this win.”Perez, who transferred to Ateneo in 2015 before moving to Lyceum last year, pumped in 22 points and 10 rebounds, but committed seven of the Pirates’ 21 turnovers, which remained a concern for Robinson.“I got too excited and too eager,” said Perez, referring to his errors.While there was no shortage in manpower for Lyceum, the Mapua Cardinals squeezed the best out of the nine players who suited up before leaning on clutch plays from Andoy Estrella to subdue Letran, 78-75.Emerging as Mapua’s go-to-guy following the decision of two-time Most Valuable Player Allwell Oraeme to sit out the season, Estrella buried a step back triple with 5.2 seconds remaining for the marginal basket.ADVERTISEMENTcenter_img The Pirates’ firepower was on display with seven players scoring at least seven points, including Perez, a former San Sebastian standout, who presided over a second half blitz to roll past one of the teams tipped to challenge San Beda for the title.Lyceum outscored JRU, 53-38, in the second half where the Pirates swarmed at the Heavy Bombers at every opportunity, forcing turnovers and translating them to easy baskets on the other end.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool starsLyceum coach Topex Robinson refused to get carried away by the performance, saying the Pirates are far from a championship team.“Obviously it’s a good output, but you don’t win a championship in the first game,” said Robinson, whose squad faces defending champion San Beda in an early clash of favorites on Friday. China furious as Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong MOST READ Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View commentslast_img read more

Rosanna Davison Kiss Me Im Vegan

first_imgWearing green bodypaint – and little else – Rosanna Davison, daughter of “Lady in Red” singer Chris De Burgh, shows off her stunning plant-fuelled body in new photos for St Patrick’s Day.Painted, courtesy of make-up artist Shima Mistry, as a sexy leprechaun lady while holding a sign that proclaims, “Kiss Me. I’m Vegan!” the certified nutritionist is spreading the word that one of the best ways to stay healthy, slim and energised is by going vegan.“Vegan meals are packed with nutrients and free of unhealthy animal fat and cholesterol, so they’re a great way to keep your weight down and your energy up”, Davison says. “The best thing to do for your health and for animals is to go vegan – for St Patrick’s Day and every day!”PETA US’ website includes an array of “veganised” recipes for St Paddy’s Day, including Irish classics such as shepherd’s pie, colcannon, brown bread and more.In addition to being, on average, slimmer than meat-eaters are, vegans are less prone to cancer, heart disease, strokes and diabetes. Vegan meals are “greener”, too, as the meat industry is a leading cause of the greenhouse-gas emissions that contribute to climate change. And of course, each vegan saves many animals a year from extreme suffering on factory farms, in abattoirs and on the decks of fishing boats.Davison is part of a growing list of celebrities – including Pamela Anderson, Alicia Silverstone, Casey Affleck, Paul McCartney, Joaquin Phoenix, John Bishop and Emily Deschanel – who have teamed up with PETA and its affiliates to promote healthy, humane, meat-free meals.For more information, please visit PETA.org.uk.last_img read more