People on the Move

first_imgNational Journal has announced several new additions to it leadership team. These hires come as the brand looks to beef up its political coverage. Stephanie Craig joins the brand as executive director of marketing and communications.  A veteran of Capitol Hill, Parliament Hill in Ottawa, the campaign trail and the Washington trade association world, Craig brings a unique perspective and experience in communications and marketing in Washington.  Angela Salazar has been named senior editor at InStyle. She had been deputy style editor at The San Francisco Chronicle. Additionally, Johnson Publishing Company has named Chan C. Smith its multimedia producer. She had been content creator at Chan C. Smith Media. Jenny Jin has been named editor at PureWow. She had been associate beauty editor at Real Simple. IBT Media announced that Arbell Noach has joined the marketing team as VP, director of social media. Noach joins IBT Media from Doremus where she was the engagement lead focusing on content, social media and influencer and experiential marketing.center_img Joining Craig on the marketing and communications team is Shannan Bowen as director of audience strategy. Bowen returned to Atlantic Media earlier this fall from The Hill, where she served as Director of Audience Engagement, where she guided the development of a new mobile site and managed an audience development strategy that set records for the publication’s mobile traffic and Facebook engagement.  Danielle Whelton joins National Journal as the senior director of membership services, overseeing the team serving the brand’s more than 1000 member organizations with custom research and strategy services. Prior to leaving journalism, Whelton spent five years as senior executive producer of CNN’s White House Unit.  LaToya Cross has been named social media manager, Jet, and digital editor at Johnson Publishing Company. She had been associate editor at N’Digo Magapaper.  Here are the rest of this week’s people on the move:last_img read more

Galaxy Fold vs Mate X Battle of the foldable phones

first_img Now playing: Watch this: Wireless charging 36 Photos How To • Huawei P30 phone announcement: How to watch, what to expect Related coverage 12GB Mobile software 4 rear cameras Connector Galaxy Fold vs. Huawei Mate X: CNET editors react RAM 512GB Kirin 980 processor No Mobile World Congress 2019 See All Price off-contract (USD) 9:54 Two 10-megapixel, 8-megapixel 3D depth 3:30 6.6-inch (2,480×1,148 pixels); 6.38-inch (2,480×892); 8-inch OLED (2,480×2,200) 2:13 Jun 1 • The Nubia Alpha looks like either a house arrest bracelet or Batman’s phone Foldable display, wireless charging, fast charging See it TCL’s DragonHinge lets phones bend and fold 4G or 5G The Huawei Mate X will come in one configuration: 5G. In fact, Huawei boasts that it’s the fastest foldable phone there is (a claim we can only check when 5G is going strong). Samsung, on the other hand, will have 4G and 5G configurations, so you’re not tied to 5G if you’re not interested in paying the extra for 5G access.Price and sale dateAffordable foldable phones aren’t here yet, but companies like TCL are working on it, and Motorola is rumored to sell a $1,500 foldable Motorola Razr. You’ll have to earmark at least $2,000 if you’re going to get either the Galaxy Fold or Huawei’s Mate X. But hold on. Let’s say you have the extra dough to spend. When do you get each phone, and will they sell where you live?  Review • Huawei P30 review: The P30 Pro’s fantastic photos for less USB-C Storage Galaxy Fold: First impressions of Samsung’s foldable… The specs (that we know about) reading • Galaxy Fold vs. Mate X: Battle of the foldable phones Now playing: Watch this: Huawei Mate X Galaxy Fold: $1,980, on sale April 26 in select markets, including the US. That converts to about £1,500 or AU$2,800.Huawei Mate X: 2,300 euros, sale date starting in select markets around June or July. Huawei says it isn’t announcing sale markets until 5G networks start taking off. Because of tensions with the US government, it’s doubtful that the Mate X will sell in the US. However the price converts roughly to $2,600, £2,000 or AU$3,660.Read: Mate X foldable phone is $$$, but Huawei hints at cheaper future foldable phones Display size, resolution But what about the screen durability? Glass isn’t at a point where it can bend enough to fold (but glassmakers are working on that), so polymer it is. That’s not a screen material you think of as being worth $2,000 or more, but there you have it. The bottom line is that with version one of foldable phones, it seems likely there will always be trade-off of one sort or another. We’ll have to see both phones side by side to see which one gets more in the way.Read: I used the Huawei Mate X and now I’m a foldable phone believerThe camerasSamsung gives its Galaxy Fold a total of six cameras: three on the back, two on the front and one on the cover. Is this confusing or helpful? How easy is it to remember which camera to use for which type of photo you want to take? And how do quality and convenience compare to the Huawei Mate X’s four cameras? It looks like there are three, but Huawei consumer CEO Richard Yu confirmed there are four — one that the company will turn on in March when it launched the Huawei P30 series of phones. $1,980, converts to £1,500 or AU$2,800 Android 9.0 with Samsung One UI 4:39 Best laptops for college students: We’ve got an affordable laptop for every student. Best live TV streaming services: Ditch your cable company but keep the live channels and DVR. 4.6-inch Super AMOLED; 7.3-inch QXGA+ Dynamic AMOLED Share your voice Front-facing camera Galaxy Fold screens: 4.6-inch exterior7.3-inch interior screenHuawei Mate X ‘screens’:8-inch OLED displayIn “closed” position, front screen is 6.6 inchesIn “closed” position, rear screen is 6.38 inchesLit-up screen switches as you turn the phone At least one N/A Jul 9 • Killer cameras and battery life might meet their match in the Note 10 Galaxy Fold vs. Mate X The fold, the screensDoes your phone fold in or out? Samsung’s Galaxy Fold takes the form of a book, with its largest screen on the inside, protected by the outer “cover.” Except in this case, one of the “covers” has a screen on it. Huawei takes the opposite approach, with the screen hugging the frame. The advantage here is that you have one screen that can act like three, depending on how you hold the phone.  Octa-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 855 512GB 8GB Comments Can Motorola’s Razr top Galaxy Fold by going smaller? Expandable storage No N/A 60 Photos Notch versus ‘wing’The Galaxy Fold has a fairly wide eyebrow notch on its 7.3-inch screen. This blacked-out area houses two camera lenses and sensors. The Mate X’s 8-inch display is notch-free, but it does have a strip on the back where the cameras line up, and a curved “wing” that serves as a handhold. I got a chance to open and close the Mate X, and I think this wing is a clever design workaround that makes sense. It seemed to mostly work as a grip, though it isn’t a comfy handle, but it does help stabilize the device when it’s opened up in tablet form, making it easier to hold without cropping the sides. 2,299 euros, converts to $2,600, £2,000 or AU$3,660 29 Power button Power button Processor Samsung Galaxy Fold Now playing: Watch this: News • Huawei P30 Pro in a gorgeous orange finish leaks Mentioned Above Huawei P30 (128GB, black) • Time for a state of the union on foldable phones. There are currently two top brand contenders, Samsung’s Galaxy Fold and Huawei’s Mate X. Both have plastic (polymer) screens that fold in half down the middle, premium specs and a sky-high price to match. They may both fold, but the similarities end there. For example, the Fold will sell on April 26 for $1,980 (with a 5G version incoming later this year). Preorders begin April 15. Meanwhile, the Mate X set its price higher, at 2,300 euros (roughly $2,600). It’ll come in a 5G model only and will start selling this summer. The Galaxy Fold also has one small screen on the outside and a large screen on the inside, while the Mate X uses one screen on the outside in three different ways. It shapeshifts depending on how you hold the device. Samsung’s phone comes with six cameras. While I’ve never seen the Galaxy Fold in the flesh (this was the closest I got to it), a new YouTube video claiming to show off the Fold appeared online.Commentary: Rushing foldable phones doesn’t work. Just ask Samsung and Huawei Foldable display, fast charging CNET may get a commission from retail offers. Jun 29 • Galaxy S10 5G, OnePlus 7 Pro LG V50 ThinQ 5G: Why you shouldn’t rush to buy a 5G phone 2:43 Huawei Motorola Samsung Published: Feb. 24 at 12:05 p.m. PTLate update, March 20 at 10:27 a.m. PT: Added new links. 4,500 mAh Now playing: Watch this: 16-megapixel (ultra wide-angle), 12-megapixel (wide-angle), 12-megapixel (telephoto) Galaxy Fold: Samsung reveals more about its foldable… Fingerprint sensor Mobile World Congress 2019 $534 Galaxy Fold vs. Huawei Mate X: Battle of the foldable phones Every foldable phone coming your way Foldable phones are so tantalizingly close Galaxy Fold is the most exciting phone in years Using the Mate X made me a foldable phone believer Battery Camera Huawei Mate X is a foldable phone with 5G May 13 • Galaxy S10E vs. iPhone XR: Every spec compared 4,380 mAh 20 Photos Close up with the Galaxy Fold screen, notch and hinge The Mate X, which I briefly tried out, has four cameras (three you can see now and one that’ll launch in March) and 5G across the board. And where the Galaxy Fold’s hinge won’t lay completely flat, Huawei boasts about the sophistication of its patented hinge.We’re still learning more about both phones. But here’s what we know about both foldable phones so far, and how they both plan to take control of our brave new foldable world. Mate X foldable phone: Here’s what it’s really like to use Tags Huawei P30 Now playing: Watch this: Foldable Phones Tablets Phoneslast_img read more

UK for fair peaceful elections in Bangladesh

first_imgUK releases the 2017 Foreign & Commonwealth Office report on `Human Rights and Democracy` on Monday.The United Kingdom has said they would continue to stress long-term importance to Bangladesh’s development of “free, fair, inclusive and peaceful” elections, says a new report.In its Bangladesh chapter of the 2017 Foreign & Commonwealth Office report on ‘Human Rights and Democracy’ the UK said they would continue to engage closely with Bangladesh on the Rohingya issue, according to UNB news agency.The UK government praised the Bangladeshi government and people for having accepted and assisted over 700,000 Rohingya refugees who fled Myanmar from August 2017 onwards.The UK also welcomed repeated government assurances that any returns of Rohingya refugees would be voluntary, safe, well-informed and dignified one.The UK took an international lead in supporting the refugees and in mobilising international attention to the situation in Rakhine State.Conditions in Rohingya refugee camps raised particular risks of violence against women, many of whom had already suffered appalling violence in Rakhine State, says the report.Working with UN and other agencies, the UK ensured the humanitarian response included help and support for the survivors of sexual and gender-based violence.It says they will support progress towards gender equality, including on girls’ education, where a focus will be on promoting equity in access, retention and learning outcomes for the most marginalised girls; combating modern slavery; pressing the authorities on enforced disappearances and extrajudicial executions.The UK will continue to engage closely with Bangladesh to support freedom of expression and other democratic freedoms.The report observed that the human rights situation in Bangladesh saw no substantive improvement in 2017.Credible reports of enforced disappearances, extrajudicial killings and torture by government agencies continued, as did government pressure on opposition parties, civil society and the media, claimed the report.The report observes that the human rights situation in Myanmar deteriorated sharply in 2017, with the crisis in Rakhine dominating the second half of the year.The UK continued to have serious concerns about human rights, including ethnic cleansing, restrictions on freedom of religion or belief, freedom of expression, and a lack of accountability for human rights violations and abuses, according to the report.Looking ahead to 2018, the report says the UK stands ready to help the government of Myanmar implement the recommendations of the Advisory Commission on Rakhine State.”The UK also welcomes the establishment of an international advisory board. Any returns of refugees to Burma (Myanmar) must be safe, voluntary and dignified and have independent monitoring by the UN High Commissioner for Refugees,” said the report.Humanitarian support to refugees in Bangladesh, through DFID, totalled 59 million pounds in 2017, said the report.”In 2018, we’ll continue funding important projects on freedom of expression and preventing sexual violence, while expanding our work to help tackle hate speech and other underlying drivers of inter-communal tensions,” says the report.last_img

Immigrant children detained in Virginia center allege abuse

first_imgA person walks into the entrance of the Shenandoah Valley Juvenile Center on Wednesday, 20 June, 2018 in Staunton, Va. Immigrant children as young as 14 housed at the juvenile detention center say they were beaten while handcuffed and locked up for long periods in solitary confinement, left nude and shivering in concrete cells. The abuse claims are detailed in federal court filings that include a half-dozen sworn statements from Latino teens jailed there for months or years. Photo : APImmigrant children as young as 14 housed at a juvenile detention center in Virginia say they were beaten while handcuffed and locked up for long periods in solitary confinement, left nude and shivering in concrete cells.The abuse claims against the Shenandoah Valley Juvenile Center near Staunton, Virginia, are detailed in federal court filings that include a half-dozen sworn statements from Latino teens jailed there for months or years. Multiple detainees say the guards stripped them of their clothes and strapped them to chairs with bags placed over their heads.”Whenever they used to restrain me and put me in the chair, they would handcuff me,” said a Honduran immigrant who was sent to the facility when he was 15 years old. “Strapped me down all the way, from your feet all the way to your chest, you couldn’t really move. … They have total control over you. They also put a bag over your head. It has little holes; you can see through it. But you feel suffocated with the bag on.”In addition to the children’s first-hand, translated accounts in court filings, a former child-development specialist who worked inside the facility independently told The Associated Press this week that she saw kids there with bruises and broken bones they blamed on guards. She spoke on condition of anonymity because she was not authorized to publicly discuss the children’s cases.In court filings, lawyers for the detention facility have denied all allegations of physical abuse.Many of the children were sent there after US immigration authorities accused them of belonging to violent gangs, including MS-13. President Donald Trump has repeatedly cited gang activity as justification for his crackdown on illegal immigration.Trump said Wednesday that “our Border Patrol agents and our ICE agents have done one great job” cracking down on MS-13 gang members. “We’re throwing them out by the thousands,” he said.But a top manager at the Shenandoah center said during a recent congressional hearing that the children did not appear to be gang members and were suffering from mental health issues resulting from trauma that happened in their home countries – problems the detention facility is ill-equipped to treat.”The youth were being screened as gang-involved individuals. And then when they came into our care, and they were assessed by our clinical and case management staff … they weren’t necessarily identified as gang-involved individuals,” said Kelsey Wong, a program director at the facility. She testified 26 April before a Senate subcommittee reviewing the treatment of immigrant children apprehended by the Homeland Security Department.Most children held in the Shenandoah facility who were the focus of the abuse lawsuit were caught crossing the border illegally alone. They were not the children who have been separated from their families under the Trump administration’s recent policy and are now in the government’s care. But the facility there operates under the same program run by the US Office of Refugee Resettlement. It was not immediately clear whether any separated children have been sent to Shenandoah Valley since the Trump administration in April announced its “zero tolerance” policy toward immigrant families, after the lawsuit was filed.The Shenandoah lockup is one of only three juvenile detention facilities in the United States with federal contracts to provide “secure placement” for children who had problems at less-restrictive housing. The Yolo County Juvenile Detention Facility in California has faced litigation over immigrant children mischaracterized as gang members.  In Alexandria, Virginia, a board overseeing the Northern Virginia Juvenile Detention Center voted this week to end its contract to house federal immigration detainees, bowing to public pressure.The Shenandoah detention center was built by a coalition of seven nearby towns and counties to lock up local kids charged with serious crimes. Since 2007, about half the 58 beds are occupied by both male and female immigrants between the ages of 12 and 17 facing deportation proceedings or awaiting rulings on asylum claims. Though incarcerated in a facility similar to a prison, the children detained on administrative immigration charges have not yet been convicted of any crime.Virginia ranks among the worst states in the nation for wait times in federal immigration courts, with an average of 806 days before a ruling. Nationally, only about half of juveniles facing deportation are represented by a lawyer, according to Justice Department data.On average, 92 immigrant children each year cycle through Shenandoah, most of them from Mexico and Central America.Wong said many of the 30 or so children housed there on any given day have mental health needs that would be better served in a residential treatment unit. But such facilities are often unwilling to accept children with significant behavioral issues, she said.Wong and other managers at the Shenandoah center, including Executive Director Timothy J. Smith, did not respond to phone and email messages seeking comment this week. A city manager on the local commission that oversees the facility referred questions to an official at the Refugee Resettlement agency, who did not respond to a phone message.Financial statements reviewed by AP shows the local government commission that operates the center received nearly $4.2 million in federal funds last year to house the immigrant children – enough to cover about two-thirds of the total operating expenses.The lawsuit filed against Shenandoah alleges that young Latino immigrants held there “are subjected to unconstitutional conditions that shock the conscience, including violence by staff, abusive and excessive use of seclusion and restraints, and the denial of necessary mental health care.”The complaint filed by the nonprofit Washington Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights and Urban Affairs recounts the story of an unnamed 17-year-old Mexican citizen apprehended at the southern border. The teen fled an abusive father and violence fueled by drug cartels to seek asylum in the United States in 2015.After stops at facilities in Texas and New York, he was transferred to Shenandoah in April 2016 and diagnosed during an initial screening by a psychologist with three mental disorders, including depression. Besides weekly sessions speaking with a counselor, the lawsuit alleges the teen has received no further mental health treatment, such as medications that might help regulate his moods and behavior.The lawsuit recounts multiple alleged violent incidents between Latino children and staff at the Shenandoah center. It describes the guards as mostly white, non-Spanish speakers who are undertrained in dealing with individuals with mental illness. The suit alleges staff members routinely taunt the Latino youths with racially charged epithets, including “wetback,” ”onion head” and “pendejo,” which roughly translates to dumbass in Spanish.A 16-year-old who said he had lived in Texas with his mother since he was an infant ended up at Shenandoah in September after a police officer pulled over a car he was riding in and asked for ID, which he couldn’t provide. As one of the few Latino kids who is fluent in English, the teen would translate for other detainees the taunts and names the staff members were calling them. He said that angered the guards, resulting in his losing such modest privileges as attending art classes.”If you are behaving bad, resisting the staff when they try to remove you from the program, they will take everything in your room away – your mattress, blanket, everything,” he said. “They will also take your clothes. Then they will leave you locked in there for a while. This has happened to me, and I know it has happened to other kids, too.”The immigrant detainees said they were largely segregated from the mostly white juveniles being held on criminal charges, but they could see that the other housing units had amenities that included plush chairs and video gaming consoles not available in the Spartan pods housing the Latinos.In their sworn statements, the teens reported spending the bulk of their days locked alone in their cells, with a few hours set aside for classroom instruction, recreation and meals. Some said they had never been allowed outdoors, while the US-born children were afforded a spacious recreation yard.The Latino children reported being fed sparse and often cold meals that left them hungry, though meals of American fast food were occasionally provided. Records show Shenandoah receives nearly $82,000 a year from the Agriculture Department to feed the immigration detainees.The lawsuit said the poor conditions, frequent physical searches and verbal abuse by staff often escalated into confrontations, as the frustrated children acted out. The staff regularly responded “by physically assaulting the youth, applying an excessive amount of force that goes far beyond what is needed to establish or regain control.”In the case of the Mexican 17-year-old, the lawsuit said a staff member who suspected him of possessing contraband threw him to the ground and forcibly tore off his clothes for an impromptu strip search. Though no forbidden items were found, the teenager was transferred to “Alpha Pod,” described in the lawsuit as a unit within the facility designated for children who engage in bad behavior.The lawsuit said Latino children were frequently punished by being restrained for hours in chairs, with handcuffs and cloth shackles on their legs. Often, the lawsuit alleged, the children were beaten by staff while bound.As a result of such “malicious and sadistic applications of force,” the immigrant youths have “sustained significant injuries, both physical and psychological,” the lawsuit said.After an altercation during which the lawsuit alleged the Mexican teenager bit a staff member during a beating, he was restrained in handcuffs and shackles for 10 days, resulting in bruises and cuts. Other teens interviewed as part of the court case also reported being punished for minor infractions with stints in solitary confinement, during which some of the children said they were left nude and shivering in cold concrete cells.Academic studies of prison inmates kept in solitary confinement have found they often experience high anxiety that can cause panic attacks, paranoia and disordered thinking that may trigger angry outbursts. For those with mental health issues, the effects can be exacerbated, often worsening the very behaviors the staff is attempting to discourage.A Guatemalan youth sent to the center when he was 14 years old said he was often locked in his tiny cell for up to 23 hours a day. After resisting the guards, he said he was also restrained for long periods.”When they couldn’t get one of the kids to calm down, the guards would put us in a chair – a safety chair, I don’t know what they call it – but they would just put us in there all day,” the teen said in a sworn statement. “This happened to me, and I saw it happen to others, too. It was excessive.”A 15-year-old from Mexico held at Shenandoah for nine months also recounted being restrained with a bag over his head. “They handcuffed me and put a white bag of some kind over my head,” he said, according to his sworn statement. “They took off all of my clothes and put me into a restraint chair, where they attached my hands and feet to the chair. They also put a strap across my chest. They left me naked and attached to that chair for two and a half days, including at night.”After being subjected to such treatment, the 17-year-old Mexican youth said he tried to kill himself in August, only to be punished with further isolation. On other occasions, he said, he has responded to feelings of desperation and hopelessness by cutting his wrists with a piece of glass and banging his head against the wall or floor.”One time I cut myself after I had gotten into a fight with staff,” the teen recounted. “I filled the room with blood. This happened on a Friday, but it wasn’t until Monday that they gave me a bandage or medicine for the pain.”The lawsuit alleges other immigrant youths held at Shenandoah have also engaged in cutting and other self-harming behaviors, including ingesting shampoo and attempting to choke themselves.A hearing in the case is set for July 3 before a federal judge in the Western District of Virginia.Lawyers on both sides in the lawsuit either did not respond to messages or declined to comment, citing strict confidentiality requirements in the case involving children.The child development specialist who previously worked with teens at Shenandoah told AP that many there developed severe psychological problems after experiencing abuse from guards.”The majority of the kids we worked with when we went to visit them were emotionally and verbally abused. I had a kid whose foot was broken by a guard,” she said. “They would get put in isolation for months for things like picking up a pencil when a guard had said not to move. Some of them started hearing voices that were telling them to hurt people or hurt themselves, and I knew when they had gotten to Shenandoah they were not having any violent thoughts.”She said she never witnessed staff abuse teens first-hand, but that teens would complain to her of injuries from being tackled by guards and reveal bruises. The specialist encouraged them to file a formal complaint.Though lawyers for Shenandoah responded with court filings denying all wrongdoing, information contained in a separate 2016 lawsuit appears to support some of the information contained in the recent abuse complaints.In a wrongful termination lawsuit filed against the Shenandoah center, a former staff member said he worked in unit called “Alpha Pod” where immigrant minors were held, “including those with psychological and mental issues and those who tend to fight more frequently.”The guard, Trenton Farris, who denied claims that he punched two children, sued the justice center alleging he was wrongly targeted for firing because he is black. Farris said most staff members at the facility are white, and that two white staff members involved in the incident over which he was fired went unpunished.Lawyers for the center denied the former guard’s claims, and the case was settled in January.last_img read more