LeBron’s 3rd visit speaks of his love for hoops-crazy Philippines, says Alapag

first_imgLeBron James interacts with Jimmy Alapag’s son Ian Maximus during the Strive for Greatness tour. INQUIRER PHOTO/ Sherwin VardeleonLeBron James has returned to the Philippines for the third time on Saturday and in the eyes of Philippine basketball icon Jimmy Alapag, this speaks volumes for the NBA superstar’s appreciation for this country.“The fact that he came here to Manila to share some brief moments with everyone here at home…I think he understands how passionate we are about the game of basketball,” said Alapag Saturday at Mall of Asia Arena as James wrapped up another showcase before Filipino fans.ADVERTISEMENT Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo LeBron James trains Gilas Pilipinas8K viewsSportsVentuno Web Player 4.51 ‘Putting in work, believing in yourself’ still keys to LeBron James’ success Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side It would’ve been James’ fourth tour in the country had his “Battle the Doubt Night” show in 2016 pushed through.But much like his in two previous visits, James once shared the floor with up-and-coming stars and national team members in a brief exhibition game for the “Strive for Greatness” show.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingAlapag, one of the key Gilas players in the last decade, showed he can still duke it out in the parquet floor—against one of the best NBA players ever no less—even a year into retirement.Saturday night was extra special, though, as he got to play again with his batch’s Gilas Pilipinas squad that include Ranidel de Ocampo and LA Tenorio, among others. Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View comments NATO’s aging eye in the sky to get a last overhaul Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong protesters Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ MOST READ LATEST STORIES Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next “What made it more special was being with my Gilas brothers because you know these guys are family for life,” said Alapag.But he also got to bring his real family with him to the bench to meet the King.His eldest child Ian Maximus, who has the same second name as LeBron’s youngest son Bryce, even got to keep LeBron’s arms sleeves.“My son will have to grow into it because it’s a little big right now and I’m just glad my kids could be here to experience it with me,” said Alapag.RELATED VIDEOADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more

One in five newly certified medical specialists unemployed in 2017 study shows

first_imgMONTREAL — Despite long patient waiting lists, almost one in five Canadian medical specialists weren’t able to find work upon graduation from their training programs in 2017 — the highest number ever reported, according to the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.A study released Wednesday by the professional association that oversees Canadian medical specialists’ education found that 19 per cent of specialists didn’t immediately find work upon completing their certification.Unemployment numbers for newly certified specialists have fluctuated between 14 and 19 per cent since the group began conducting surveys in 2011, with the 2017 numbers being the most recent.The numbers don’t point to a surplus of specialists but rather a need for better planning, according to a spokeswoman for the group.For the moment, “the system isn’t working in an optimal way,” said Danielle Frechette, the executive director of the royal college’s Office of Research, Health Policy and Advocacy and one of the survey’s authors.In a phone interview, she said some doctors can spend more than a year job-hunting.The goal of the survey is to “find solutions for problems linked to employment of doctors, to improve physician workforce planning and inform career choice,” the royal college said.The response rate to the initial survey was 37 per cent, while 51 per cent of specialists who reported employment challenges agreed to a follow-up survey.The survey suggests changes need to be made to better serve patients, Frechette said. “If governments think of aligning human resources with physical resources to give care more punctually, we would all be happier,” she said.The survey respondents noted several barriers to finding employment, including a lack of positions in their specialty; poor access to job listings; their own reluctance to leave their home cities due to family obligations; a lack of resources including hospital beds or operating rooms; and the delayed retirement of senior physicians and surgeons. “Some hospitals would like to hire me but no funding for operating room time so no job. Older surgeons don’t want to retire,” one newly certified oncologist wrote in the survey.As for those who don’t want to move, many are members of “generation sandwich,” who are simultaneously caring for children and aging parents, Frechette said.The 2017 survey results confirmed previous years’ findings that surgical specialities requiring more resources are the most affected by employment issues. Neurosurgeons and radiation oncologists were the most affected in each of the seven years the survey has been conducted, followed by orthopedic surgeons and nuclear medicine specialists.At the same time that specialists report difficulty finding employment, an international investigation has found that Canadians have reported longer wait times than other similar countries when it comes to seeing a specialist.More than half of Canadians, or 56 per cent, waited more than four weeks to see a specialist, compared to the international average of 36 per cent. This is according to the 2016 Commonwealth Fund International Health Policy Survey of adults in 11 countries, the royal college said.The good news in the survey is that 61 per cent of specialists who reported difficulty in finding employment had secured a position by the time a follow-up survey was given 12 to 17 months after certification, Frechette said.Stephanie Marin, The Canadian Presslast_img read more