Molecular Machines on Parade

first_imgThe fact that protein machines use energy to undergo conformational rearrangements, and that these “moving parts” perform functional work, places them squarely in the realm of machinery – except on a scale so tiny, their operations are only now coming to light.1.  Valeria V�squez and Eduardo Perozo, “Structural Biology: A channel with a twist,” Nature 461, 47-49 (3 September 2009) | doi:10.1038/461047a.2.  Liu, Gandhi and Rees, “Structure of a tetrameric MscL in an expanded intermediate state,” Nature 461, 120-124 (3 September 2009) | doi:10.1038/nature08277.3.  Cook, Fukuhara, Jinek and Conti, “Structures of the tRNA export factor in the nuclear and cytosolic states,” Nature 461, 60-65 (3 September 2009) | doi:10.1038/nature08394.4.  Guydosh and Block, “Direct observation of the binding state of the kinesin head to the microtubule,” Nature 461, 125-128 (3 September 2009) | doi:10.1038/nature08259.Molecular machines – the very concept is only a couple of decades old.  This is phenomenal.  It is marvelous and wonderful beyond description.  You can almost sense the astonishment and excitement of these biophysicists uncovering these tiny wonders in the cell.  Who could have imagined this is how life works?  Think of the centuries, the millennia, of people going about their business, oblivious to the fact that at scales too tiny to imagine a whole factory of automated molecular machines was keeping them alive.  The few thinkers after the discovery of cells by Robert Hooke envisioned little people (homunculi) doing some of it, but our instruments were too coarse to elucidate the workings inside till recently – till our generation.  Next to the discovery of DNA and the genetic code this must be considered one of the most important discoveries in the history of science.  If Antony van Leeuwenhoek was astonished at what he saw with his primitive hand lens, how much more should we be flabbergasted at what is coming into focus, now that we can discern the activity of individual molecules?    The Darwinists are strangely silent about all this.  In our 9 years of reporting, very few papers on molecular machines have even mentioned evolution (e.g., 10/02/2001, 01/09/2002), and those that did usually just assumed it rather than tried to seriously explain how the most primitive life-forms could have became endowed with factories of mechanical filters, scribes, taxicabs and walking robots by chance (e.g., 09/16/2000, 08/24/2009 08/26/2005).  Search on “molecular machines” in the search bar above and check.  There are lots of examples.  It’s time to cast off that antiquated 19th-century mindset that tried to imagine all this from the bottom up.  Let us regard as silly the tales of miracles of “emergence” occurring mindlessly in “a chance Motion of I don’t know what little Particles,” as Christiaan Huygens, our Scientist of the Month, quipped.  Paley is back with a vengeance.  The contrivances of nature are more wonderful than he or any other philosopher or scientist could have imagined.  It’s a Designed world after all.  Rejoice, give thanks and sing!(Visited 10 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Scientific papers continue to exhibit the exquisite mechanisms in the cell for handling all kinds of situations, through the operation of molecular machines.  Here are a few recent examples from this week’s issue of Nature (Sept 3, 2009).Molecular sieve:  What happens when a cell gets bloated?  Too much water entering a cell can increase the pressure against the membrane, “potentially compromising the integrity of the cell,” said Valeria V�squez and Eduardo Perozo in Nature this week.1  They described findings about a molecular sieve named MscL by Liu et al in the same issue of Nature.2  MscL in bacteria is made up of multiple protein parts that form a pore in the cell membrane.  The research team from Caltech and Howard Hughes Medical Institute found that the components flatten out and pivot, opening up the pore like an iris when sufficient pressure is applied.  This is called “mechanosensation” because it operates automatically via mechanical pressure.  “These channels act as ‘emergency relief valves,’ protecting bacteria from lysis [disruption] upon acute osmotic down-shock,” the authors said.  “MscL has a complex gating behaviour; it exhibits several intermediates between the closed and open states, including one putative non-conductive expanded state and at least three sub-conducting states.”  The team’s contribution was to image one of the intermediate states.    The research paper did not mention evolution.  V�squez and Perozo, however, said, “free-living cells have evolved a variety of mechanisms to deal with sudden variations in the physicochemical properties of their surroundings,” and later said, “Most prokaryotes (bacteria and archaea) have therefore evolved a ‘pressure-release valve’ mechanism in which changes in membrane tension open up channels to form large, aqueous pores in the membrane,” but they did not explain how evolution could have accomplished this.  They made it sound like the bacteria purposely employed evolution (whatever they meant by the term) to solve a real problem.  They did not explain how bacteria got through osmotic down-shock without the pressure release valves.Molecular taxicab:  Transfer RNAs (tRNA) are made in the nucleus but need to commute to work outside, in the cytoplasm, where the ribosomes are.  They are small enough to barely squeeze through the nuclear pore complex (NPC) – the complicated gates in the nuclear membrane that control traffic in and out – but they don’t avail themselves of that freedom, lest their exposed parts interact with the authentication mechanisms of the NPC.  Instead, they hale a taxicab to escort them through.  That taxicab, or “tRNA export factor,” is called Xpot.    Xpot is a complex molecule that fits around the exposed parts of the tRNA.  It literally “wraps around” the tRNA, undergoing conformational changes as it clamps on.  Imagine a taxicab wrapping around you, and you get the picture.  Xpot is general enough to fit all 20 kinds of tRNAs, but specific enough to protect their delicate active sites.  It is also able to recognize and reject tRNAs that are immature.  Only tRNAs that have passed a processing exam are allowed in the taxi.  The authors of a paper in Nature who studied Xpot said, “Xpot undergoes a large conformational change on binding cargo, wrapping around the tRNA and, in particular, binding to the tRNA 5′ and 3′ ends.  The binding mode explains how Xpot can recognize all mature tRNAs in the cell and yet distinguish them from those that have not been properly processed, thus coupling tRNA export to quality control.”3  As an additional control, Xpot does not interact with tRNA except in the presence of another factor in the nucleus called RanGTP.  After safe transport through the nuclear pore complex, another factor in the cytoplasm unlocks the RanGTP, allowing the Xpot taxicab to unwrap from the tRNA.  The tRNA then heads off to the ribosome to fulfill its work shift as a scribe, translating the genetic code into the protein code.  “Transfer RNAs are among the most ubiquitous molecules in cells,” they said, “central to decoding information from messenger RNAs on translating ribosomes.”    The authors of the paper did not discuss how Xpot originated, but six times they said that parts of Xpot are either “conserved,” “evolutionarily conserved” or “highly conserved” (i.e., unevolved) throughout the living world.Molecular sherpa:  Kinesin is among the most fascinating molecular machines in the cell, because it literally “walks” hand-over-hand on microtubule trails, carrying cargo.  In doing this, it converts chemical energy from ATP into mechanical work.  Writing in this week’s Nature,4 Guydosh and Block of Stanford described direct observation of the binding state of the hands (called heads) of kinesin to the microtubule.  They found that it walks tiptoe on the tightrope: “Here we report the development of a single-molecule assay that can directly report head binding in a walking kinesin molecule, and show that only a single head is bound to the microtubule between steps at low ATP concentrations.”  The rear head has to unbind before the forward head can bind.  This keeps the kinesin from getting stuck with both feet (heads) on the tightrope.  If you can stand some jargon, here is what they said about the complexities of how this works:The inability of one head to bind the microtubule offers a natural explanation for the observation that the microtubule-stimulated release of ADP is inhibited until the microtubule-attached head binds ATP and docks its neck linker (Fig. 4, state 2).  Strain produced by an unfavourable neck-linker conformation also explains the observation that ATP does not bind prematurely to the front, nucleotide-free head of a 2-HB kinesin molecule (Fig. 4, state 3).  Any tight binding of ATP is disfavoured because it is coupled to neck-linker docking and, therefore, to the generation of a strained configuration in which both neck linkers are docked (Fig. 4, S3).  We anticipate that the single-molecule techniques presented here will be applicable to the study of dynamic properties of other motors and macromolecules that undergo analogous conformational rearrangements.last_img read more

South Africa’s fight against corruption continues

first_img27 January 2016South Africa’s score of 44 on the Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI), released today by Transparency International (TI), remains unchanged from 2014, while the country’s ranking has shifted favourably from 67 to 61. It shows that perceptions of the extent of corruption in South Africa are stabilising.A country’s score refers to the perceived level of public sector corruption on a scale of zero to 100, where zero means that a country is perceived as highly corrupt and 100 that a country is perceived as very clean.A country’s rank indicates its position relative to the other countries included in the index, which numbered 168 in 2015.By 2030, South Africa’s National Development Plan envisions zero tolerance for corruption, with anti-corruption agencies being well-resourced, and having skilled and experienced officials with the power to investigate and prosecute corruption.South Africa ranked 61 out of 168 countries in the 2015 Corruption Perceptions Index from Transparency International, released on 27 January 2016. (Image: Transparency International)“The good news is that for the second year in succession, our score, as measured by the CPI, has remained the same and our ranking has improved slightly,” observed David Lewis, the executive director of Corruption Watch, TI’s local affiliate. “The bad news is that we are still ranked amongst those countries perceived to have a serious corruption problem, with our ranking perilously close to those countries suffering from endemic corruption.”According to Corruption Watch, however, there is a way to move forward:It is necessary to demonstrate that no-one is above the law. There should be a focus on the criminal justice authorities, the police and the judiciary to function efficiently and demonstrate fairness. In the 2015 Corruption Perceptions Index, the public perceived the military and religious organisations to be the least affected by corruption. (Image: Transparency International)Regarding Africa, the report states:“If corruption and impunity are to ‘be a thing of the past’ as stated by the African Union in Agenda 2063, The Africa We Want, governments need to take bold steps to ensure rule of law is the reality for everyone. Prosecuting corruption will restore faith among people who no longer believe in the institutions that are supposed to protect them. Transparency and accountability must go hand in hand when tackling corruption.”How did the numbers come about?The CPI is assembled from a compound of surveys conducted during the year by international organisations such as the World Bank, the African Development Bank and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.According to Corruption Watch, the individuals who participated in the surveys were largely public and private sector leaders and academics.The Nordic countries of Denmark, Finland and Sweden ranked as the top three countries with the least corruption, obtaining scores of 91, 90, and 89 respectively.To read the full report, click here.Source: Corruption Watchlast_img read more

Death By Lawsuit: SCO Resurrects And Insanity Is Restored

first_imgTags:#Apple#Google#Java#lawsuits#litigation#mobile#Oracle#Patents#Samsung#SCO Group Matt Asay IT + Project Management: A Love Affair If ever we needed confirmation that markets, not courtrooms, should decide the technologies we use, witness SCO Group’s reborn dream to sue all of UNIX-dom into its wallet. It was a specious lawsuit in 2003 when SCO Group (now Xinuos) first launched its $1 billion broadside against IBM. It’s even more farcical today. Sadly, it’s not clear that the legal fights between Apple and Samsung, or Oracle and Google, are much better.First, to SCO Group.SCO Is Like A CockroachYou can be forgiven for thinking bankruptcy, unsympathetic judges and the truth would have killed SCO’s chances of getting its $1 billion IBM payday. That is, you can be forgiven for thinking that occasionally common sense prevails in the courtroom. But as Groklaw notes, a judge has just granted SCO Group (Xinuos) a new lease on its litigious life. Basically, Xinuos wants a “redo,” suggesting that its bankruptcy proceedings unfairly foreclosed its ability to troll.And let’s be clear: this is all about trolling.It’s perhaps fitting that the company that acquired SCO Group’s assets, Xinuos, lists four members of management, three of whom are operations and sales-focused (read: keeping costs down while they swing for the litigation fences), and only one is an engineer. That engineer is too embarrassed to show his face: Related Posts 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo… This is a company set up to sue. In common parlance, it is a troll. Fittingly, it’s headquartered in Las Vegas, where the culture of rolling the dice on speculative “investments” pervades.SCO Group reborn as UnXis renamed to Xinuos should be dead. The lawsuit that tormented the industry for years should have been declared stillborn when first launched. And yet we continue to live with this silly charade.More Respectable LawsuitsNot that industry litigation between respectable companies fares much better. Samsung just got a ban on Apple’s importation of old iPhones. Previous to this, Apple won $1 billion from Samsung plus an injunction against Samsung shipping certain phones. The injunction was subsequently wiped out and the damages were trimmed 43%.It’s a tit-for-tat with no end (or victor) in sight.The same holds true for Oracle’s lawsuit against Google over the use of Java in Android. The two parties trade victories and defeats, then appeal, and cross-appeal ad nauseum. The only winners in this and other lawsuits are the attorneys collecting fees.The Market Rolls OnDespite all of this nonsense, consumers and businesses continue to make purchasing decisions based on quality and value, not lawsuits. Linux has eclipsed UNIX and threatens Windows. Android dominates the mobile landscape. Not one of these inane lawsuits has changed these facts.So why do credible firms like Apple and Oracle follow the lead of trolls like SCO Group?Perhaps they hope to delay the inevitable. If Apple can slow Samsung’s market share gains, it stands to make even more profits. Or perhaps they hope to get paid for others’ successes. Microsoft makes serious money on Android, despite not contributing anything of value to its development. Oracle may hope to achieve the same in its lawsuit with Google, but part of its strategy may simply be to ensure that others continue to license Java, even if Google refuses, as I’ve written before.In some cases, technology firms sue in order to discover competitors’ trade secrets in the course of the litigation.Or maybe, just maybe, they’re all suing, as Gizmodo opines, because the patent system is irretrievably broken and so much money is at stake in these emerging markets like mobile. In the case of Xinuos, however, there’s just one reason for its cockroach-like existence: to roll the dice one more time in the hope of getting something for nothing. Let’s hope it fails in a way that it finally, truly dies.Image courtesy of Shutterstock. Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of…last_img read more

NTL DAY 2: MENS OPEN METS AND SCORPS PRODUCE THRILLING DRAW

first_imgFor all the results and tables for all divisons go to the TFA SPORTINGPULSE WEBSITEDay two of the 2007 National Touch League saw many teams produce some exciting and skilful touch. In the Mens Open the Sydney Mets and Sydney Scorpions sit equally on top after a thrilling 7-all draw. The Mets started strongly, with the speed of both the players and ball beating the Scorpions. A quality dummy saw Scott Buckley open the scoring for the Mets, and they shot out to a 2-0 lead within minutes. Scorpions hit back through the fancy footwork and ball skills from brothers John and Maurice Kennedy to send Heath Cooper over the line. The skills from both sides continued as they traded touchdowns the Scorpions went to the break ahead 4-3. Buckley opened the second half much like the first, scoring on the first set. As the speed increased on the field, the intensity rose on the sidelines also, with a number of spectators gathering to watch the game. An injury to Mets’ Anthony Ziade midway through the half stopped play for several minutes, and on return the Mets hit the front when a Gary Sonda cut-out ball found Cameron Nicholls. Sonda pumped his fist with the result looking sealed at 7-6, but a penalty on the siren and an entertaining finish in the corner from Maurice Kennedy leveled the match at 7-all.The Barbarians have showed they are one of the lead contenders for the Womens Open title, after a dominant display in the second half over last years champions the Sharks. The match was locked at nil-all at the break, and the barbs came out firing, led by Australian World Cup Womens player Bo De La Cruz, who was on the receiving end of a Charli Simpkins ball to score and give Barbarians the lead. The Barbarians continued to play skillful and entertaining touch, much to the delight of the crowd, to extend to a 4-0 lead. The Sharks responded, but never looked like catching the Barbarians, who took the match 6-2.9amMens Open: Scorpions (10) def Eagles (6)Mens Open: Rustlers (7) def Barbarians (6)Mens Open:  Rebels (9) def ACT (0)Mixed Open: Mets (11) def Rustlers (1)Mixed Open: Rebels (10) def Suns (3)Mens 20s: Mets (13) def Cyclones (7)9.50amMixed Open: Sharks (10) def Barbarians (3) Mixed Open: Cobras (10) def Cyclones (5)Mens 20s: ACT (4) def Sharks (1)Mens Open: Sharks (10) def Crusaders (1) Mens Open: Suns (14) def Hornets (2)Mens Open: Cobras (11) v Cyclones (4)Mixed Open: Hornets (5) v Scorpions (4)10.40amMens 20s:  Cobras (10) def Crusaders (3)Mens 20s: Suns (7) def Hornets (4)Womens 20s: Cobras (17) def Crusaders (1)Womens Open: Suns (14) def Eagles (1)Womens Open: Rustlers (4) drew Cyclones (4)Womens Open: Crusaders (12) def Scorpions (3)11.30amWomens 20s: Rebels (4) def ACT (2)Womens 20s: Sharks (3) def Eagles (2)Womens 20s: Hornets (7) def Cyclones (1)Womens Open: Sharks (8) def Rebels (0)Womens Open: Barbarians (9) def Hornets (0)Womens Open: Cobras (9) def ACT (1)12.20pmMens Open: Mets (7) drew Scorpions (7)Mens Open: Eagles (6) def ACT (1)Mens Open: Barbarians (6) def Rebels (4)Womens 20s:  Rustlers (6) def Mets (3)Mixed Open: Hornets (6) def Cobras (3)Mixed Open: Barbarians (8) def Suns (5)Mixed Open: Rebels (10) def Rustlers (8)1.10pmMens Open: Sharks (11)def Suns (7)Mens Open: Cobras (12) def Crusaders (3)Mens Open: Cyclones (6) def Hornets (4)Mixed Open: Mets (10) def Scorpions (5)Mixed Open: Sharks (10) def Cyclones (3)2.00pmWomens Open: Mets (5) def Suns (0)Womens Open: Crusaders (10) def Eagles (1)Womens Open: Cyclones (14) def Scorpions (0)Mens 20s: Cobras (8) def ACT (2)Mens 20s: Suns (15) def Crusaders (0)Mens 20s: Mets (9) def Hornets (2)2.50pmWomens Open: Barbarians (6) def Sharks (2)Womens Open: Cobras (9) def Rebels (0)Womens Open: ACT (8) def Hornets (1)Womens 20s: Cobras (8) def Suns (4) Womens 20s: Sharks (10) def Crusaders (0)Mens 20s: Rustlers (7) def Cyclones (4)3.40pmMixed Open: Mets (12) def Suns (6)Mixed Open: Sharks (11) def Rustlers (2)Mixed Open: Rebels (7) def Cobras (5)Womens 20s: Hornets (4) def Rebels (0)Womens 20s: Eagles (9) def Mets (2)Womens 20s: Rustlers (8) def Cyclones (4)4.30pmMens 20s:  ACT (7) def Crusaders (2)Mens Open: Mets (15) def ACT (0)Mens Open: Rustlers (15) def Rebels (5)Mixed Open: Scorpions (13) def Barbarians (4)Mixed Open: Hornets (14) def Cyclones (2)5.20pmWomens Open:  Rustlers (12) def Scorpions (0)Womens Open: Mets (8) def Crusaders (1)Womens Open: Cyclones  (5) drew Suns (5)Mens 20s: Suns (6) def Rustlers (4)Mens 20s: Sharks (6) def Hornets (3)Mens Open:  Scorpions (9) Barbarians (8)6.10pmWomens 20s: Cyclones (2) drew Mets (2)Womens 20s: Suns (11) def Rustlers (2)Womens 20s: Eagles (6) drew Hornets (6)Womens 20s: Sharks (10) def Rebels (4)Womens 20s: Crusaders (4) def ACT (3)Mens 20s:  Cobras (7) def Cyclones (3)last_img read more

Introducing Indoor Touch

first_imgThe sport of Touch Football continues to grow across the nation, with the ACT introducing Indoor Touch, enabling players to continue to enjoy the game, whilst avoiding the cold climate. Free trials held at 6:30pm on Thursday 19 June, Thursday 26 June and Thursday 3 July 2008 at mPowerDome, Fadden, ACTThe Indoor Touch Football season will start on Thursday 24 July 2008 (Term 3). Nominations will be taken for Men’s and Mixed competitions. To register or for further information please contact:ACT Touch Ph: 6212 2880mPowerDome Ph: 6298 5500last_img read more

All Jamaicans who Requested Evacuation Help are Home

first_img Prime Minister, the Most Hon. Andrew Holness, says all Jamaicans who requested evacuation assistance from hurricane-ravaged Eastern Caribbean islands have returned home.He told the House of Representatives on September 26 that 200 Jamaicans were airlifted home from the affected territories where they were based, including the Turks and Caicos, and the British Virgin Islands, at a cost of $50 million.Mr. Holness said several persons opted to remain in those countries to assist with recovery and rebuilding efforts, citing the gesture as “commendable” and reflective of the “Jamaican spirit”.He informed that they have, however, sent their children back to Jamaica to continue their education, consequent on the resulting disruption in the education system.Meanwhile, Mr. Holness said the Government is exploring what additional assistance can be extended to affected Eastern Caribbean islands, particularly Antigua and Barbuda, and Dominica, for which Jamaica has already committed financial resources and personnel to assist with recovery and rebuilding efforts.The Prime Minister, who was responding to a query from Central St. Mary Member of Parliament, Dr. Morais Guy, cited the provision of accommodation and educational support services for students whose schools have a similar curriculum to Jamaica’s, particularly those preparing for the 2017/18 Caribbean Secondary Education Certificate (CSEC) and Caribbean Advanced Proficiency Examination (CAPE).Additionally, he said consequent on discussions with Dominica’s Prime Minister, Roosevelt Skerrit, the Government will explore the possibility of completing a bridge, construction of which the Jamaica Defence Force (JDF) commenced following extensive flood rains previously impacting that island.“My understanding is that we went, did some assessments and started (work), but did not complete it,” he indicated.Mr. Holness said the Government will determine whether the JDF’s 120-man Disaster Assistance Response Team (DART), being deployed to Dominica in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria following Prime Minister Skerrit’s request for support, can assist with that and other infrastructure repairs after assessments of damage and dislocation sustained are completed.The DART’s deployment is among the assistance which Mr. Holness advised the House that the Government has committed to Dominica’s recovery efforts.He indicated that the deployment is being done in three phases, with the first team having been dispatched on September 26. The remaining two teams are scheduled to land in Dominica on September 27.The team will be assisting with security and distribution of relief supplies; the provision of limited medical care; conducting damage assessments; recovery planning; basic engineering work; and logistics management.Additionally, Mr. Holness said the Government has committed to providing Dominica with a four-man technical and advisory support team to be led by the JDF’s Colonel, Jamie Ogilvie.This intervention, he said, is intended to assist with efforts to restore the integrity of Dominica’s national security systems and develop a plan for the recovery and rebuilding of that nation.The Government has also committed the equivalent of US$100,000 each to the redevelopment funds for Antigua and Barbuda, and Dominica.Meanwhile, Mr. Holness said members of the JDF were also deployed as part of the CARICOM Disaster Response Unit to provide immediate relief in Tortola, British Virgin Islands, in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma.He advised that they remain in that territory “working tirelessly” on behalf of Jamaica and CARICOM.Mr. Holness said the latest information he has received puts the death toll at 160, and the overall value of damage sustained in the Caribbean and United States at some US$100 billion.“We again extend our sympathies to all countries that were impacted by what has been described as the ‘ferocity and brutality’ of these recent hurricanes, which left a trail of destruction never before seen in the Caribbean. I have great confidence that, as a region, we will rebuild and not just replicate what was there before,” he said.The Prime Minister pointed out that this approach will be one of systematic renewal, with planned, structured development; with stronger homes and supporting amenities; and infrastructure that is strong, resilient and sustainable.“We pray for our brothers and sisters and remind them that out of adversity will come opportunity,” Mr. Holness said. Additionally, he said consequent on discussions with Dominica’s Prime Minister, Roosevelt Skerrit, the Government will explore the possibility of completing a bridge, construction of which the Jamaica Defence Force (JDF) commenced following extensive flood rains previously impacting that island. Mr. Holness said several persons opted to remain in those countries to assist with recovery and rebuilding efforts, citing the gesture as “commendable” and reflective of the “Jamaican spirit”. Prime Minister, the Most Hon. Andrew Holness, says all Jamaicans who requested evacuation assistance from hurricane-ravaged Eastern Caribbean islands have returned home. Story Highlightslast_img read more

Minister Reiterates Commitment to Take Schools off Shift System

first_img “This will help to prepare in the transition process to a single-shift system. It is important that we do so, because we are not doing so for ourselves, we are doing it for the future and for the transformation of St. James,” the Minister said. Minister of Education, Youth and Information, Senator the Hon. Ruel Reid, has reiterated that urgent steps are being taken by the Government to get schools across Jamaica, such as the St. James High School in Montego Bay, off the two-shift system.Speaking at a ceremony to mark the official opening of a new three-storey block of classrooms at the St. James High School on January 30, Mr. Reid said he is proud that despite the double-shift system, the institution has been performing extremely well.“I am in a hurry under my shift, to fix all of these problems. Yes, I have 42 schools still on shift and, systematically, we are going to take them off one by one,” the Minister said.Senator Reid noted that the Ministry responded quickly when St. James High requested financial support for additional classroom spaces and for the construction of a perimeter wall.“This will help to prepare in the transition process to a single-shift system. It is important that we do so, because we are not doing so for ourselves, we are doing it for the future and for the transformation of St. James,” the Minister said.Meanwhile, Senator Reid said the Ministry will be constructing five new high schools across the island, one of which will be in St. James, which will add significantly to the number of classroom spaces available in western Jamaica.“We have a lot of work to do, but, under God, we are going to get it done. I am getting full support, and I have the fiscal space to get it done,” he said.The Minister also visited Anchovy High School in St. James, and the Knockalva Agricultural School and the Knockalva Technical High School in neighbouring Hanover.Mr. Reid told JIS News that he was happy to have visited the institutions to get a first-hand look at their operations and make assessments and recommendations.“My tour has been extremely successful, and I am very happy to be able to get out of the office to see exactly what is happening in these institutions and to give some policy direction,” he added. Speaking at a ceremony to mark the official opening of a new three-storey block of classrooms at the St. James High School on January 30, Mr. Reid said he is proud that despite the double-shift system, the institution has been performing extremely well. Minister of Education, Youth and Information, Senator the Hon. Ruel Reid, has reiterated that urgent steps are being taken by the Government to get schools across Jamaica, such as the St. James High School in Montego Bay, off the two-shift system. Story Highlightslast_img read more

PARTNER CLAIMS 10000 SOCAN SONGWRITING PRIZE

first_imgAdvertisement TORONTO, June 14, 2018 – A series of quirky videos and social media savvy helped Josée Caron and Lucy Nilesclinch the top spot in the 13th annual English SOCAN Songwriting Prize presented by YouTube Music. “Play The Field” was written by the Atlantic Canada natives and is performed by the band they co-front, Partner. The SOCAN Songwriting Prize is one of few competitions in Canada that award excellence in songwriting. Ten outstanding songs created by emerging songwriters over the past year are nominated by a panel of 15 esteemed music industry experts. The general public is then invited to vote daily for their favourite to determine the winner. SOCAN plays no role in determining the nominees or winners outside of ensuring they are members of SOCAN. A mirroring competition for songs in French, the Prix de la chanson SOCAN, is conducted separately.“Congratulations to Josée Caron and Lucy Niles on winning the 2018 SOCAN Songwriting Prize. In a competition that celebrates songwriting there was no shortage of great songs this year and winning was no easy feat,” said Michael McCarty, Chief Membership & Business Development Officer at SOCAN.  “The diversity in genres, gender, and cultural influences truly showcased the breadth of not only our talent but the unique stories that Canadian songwriters have to tell. “Play The Field” is a force and we wish Josée and Lucy continued success in the early days of what is sure to be a long and successful music career.”Caron and Niles added, “‘Play the Field’ is one of our most personal songs, about an innocent time in a young person’s life. Writing it was an exciting experience. Josée made a funny demo and Lucy wrote her verse while working at Tim’s. We would like to thank all the music lovers and supporters for the huge opportunity and compliment. It is an honour to be nominated alongside so many talented songwriters.”The winner of the Prix de la chanson SOCAN is “56k” written by Simon Trudeau Cliche, Jeff Martinez, Marc Vincent; performed by LOUD and published by Productions Silence D’Or.The other nine songs nominated in the English category were:“Dreams Tonite” – written by Alec O’Hanley, Molly Rankin; performed by Alvvays; published by Rough Trade Publishing Canada.“Money” – written by Leandra Earl, Eliza Enman-McDaniel, Jordan Miller, Kylie Miller, Garrett Lee; performed by The Beaches; published by Done with Dolls Inc., Besme, administered by Kobalt Music Group Ltd.“Main Girl” – written by Charlotte Cardin; performed by Charlotte Cardin; published by Red Brick c/o Corico Arts.“Cotton Candy” – written by Jessie Reyez; performed by Jessie Reyez; published by BMG Rights Management Canada.“Chills” – written by James Barker, Gavin Slate, Travis Wood, Donovan Woods; performed by James Barker Band; published by Warner Chappell Music Canada, Ole Media Management LP II.“Walkaway” – written by Jasmyn Burke, Morgan Waters; performed by Weaves.“Magic”– written by Eoin Killeen, Timothy Law, Patrisha Sanna Campbell; performed by Birthday Boy and Trish.“Healers” – written by Benjamin McCarthy, Iskwé, Ryan Somerville; performed by Iskwé.“Lingua Franca” – written by Neil Bednis, Christopher Laurignano, Fraser McClean, Melanie St. Pierre; performed by Casper Skulls.The 2017 winner of the SOCAN Songwriting Prize was PUP for “DVP” written by band members Stefan Babcock, Nestor Chumak, Zachary Mykula, and Steven Sladkowski. Additional winners are available to view on the SOCAN Songwriting Prize website.About SOCANSOCAN connects more than four-million music creators worldwide and more than a quarter-million businesses and individuals in Canada. More than 150,000 songwriters, composers and music publishers are its direct members, and more than 100,000 organizations are Licensed To Play music across Canada. With a concerted use of progressive technology and unique data as well as a commitment to lead the global transformation of music rights, with wholly-owned companies Audiam and MediaNet, SOCAN is dedicated to upholding the fundamental truths that music has value and music creators and publishers deserve fair compensation for their work. For more information: www.socan.com Advertisement Twitter Login/Register With:center_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Facebook Advertisement Variety and balance were evident in the 2018 competition in which women dominated, several genres were represented and, for the first time, a country song landed in the top 10. Music fans made their voices heard as they voted for their favourite songs among the finalists, and in the end, Partner would prevail receiving the $10,000 cash prize, a  Yamaha PSR-S970 Keyboard, and a  $500 gift card from Long & McQuade.“We are so thrilled and honoured to be the recipients of the SOCAN Songwriting Prize,” said Caron and Niles. “Songwriting is one of our all-time greatest joys, and to be recognized by fellow music lovers in this capacity is a dream come true.”last_img read more