5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Thursday February 7 2019

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below are 5 things to do in Wilmington on Thursday, February 7, 2019:#1) Instant Pot Cooking Class At Wilmington LibraryThe Wilmington Memorial Library (175 Middlesex Avenue) is hosting “Feasting With Your Instant Pot” at 7pm. The instant pot craze is here, are you onboard? For many of us, the instant pot is patiently waiting to be used. Whether yours is tucked away in a cupboard or still in the box, it’s time to take it out your electric pressure cooker and put it to use. Join chef Liz Barbour for a cooking class that will help take the mystery out of this amazing, time saving kitchen tool. Liz will demonstrate two recipes that you can recreate at home. Following her demonstration Liz will offer tasty samples for everyone to enjoy. Registration is full, but there are still spots available on the waiting list HERE.#2) Drop-In Meditation At Wilmington LibraryThe Wilmington Memorial Library (175 Middlesex Avenue) is hosting a meditation class at 12:30pm. Join technology librarian Brad McKenna for his weekly drop-in meditation sessions. It will be a mixture of silent and guided meditations. The Insight Timer app will be used so you can continue your practice at home. No registration required.#3) Wilmington Recreation Commission MeetingThe Wilmington Recreation Commission meets at 5pm in Town Hall’s Room 9. Read the agenda HERE.#4) Wilmington Finance Committee MeetingThe Wilmington Finance Committee meets at 7pm in Town Hall’s Room 9. Budgets for Planning & Conservation, Building Inspector, and Board of Appeals will be discussed. Rea the agenda HERE.#5) Tour Of Wilmington Town MuseumThe Town Museum (430 Salem Street) is open from 10am to 2pm. Come explore Wilmington’s history. Free admission.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… Related5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Thursday, September 5, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Thursday, August 8, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Tuesday, August 13, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”last_img read more

Suspended HISD Chief Auditor Back To Work

first_img Share The chief auditor for the Houston Independent School District has been ordered back to work, five months after he was abruptly suspended. In March, HISD informed Richard Patton that he was being suspended and reassigned to home duty for alleged “misconduct and other performance concerns.”HISD never gave an example or further explained his suspension.It came months after Patton questioned the district’s administration of its school construction projects and a massive budget shortfall of more than $200 million.Patton later filed a whistle-blower grievance, claiming he was retaliated against because he reported suspicious activity to law enforcement officers.Now HISD says in a statement that it “has resolved the issues related to his temporary reassignment.” He’s been directed back to duty as chief auditor, effective Wednesday.last_img read more

Reeder Wants DC Open for Everyone

first_imgDionne Reeder, a small business owner in Ward 8, wants to be the next Independent D.C. Council member because she wants to help Washingtonians be the best they can be and have a thriving city to which they can contribute.“Let’s make the investments in our communities to allow every D.C. resident to reach their full potential because if you work hard you should have equal access to opportunities,” Reeder said.Dionne Reeder, a small business owner in Ward 8, is running for a seat on the D.C. Council. (Courtesy photo)Reeder owns the Cheers@The Big Chair that is located in Ward 8 on Martin Luther King Jr., Ave., Southeast.  In an interview with the AFRO, Reeder said that public service is a calling.A native Washingtonian, Reeder grew up in the Columbia Heights neighborhood of Ward 1. She graduated from Theodore Roosevelt High School and went to West Virginia State University, where she served as the president of the Student Government Association.Reeder has worked for the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Natural Resources as a legislative assistant and for the D.C. Community Prevention Partnership where she assisted over 200 people to go to college.The entrepreneur’s work caught the eye of then D.C. Chief Financial Officer Anthony Williams, and he gave her $9 million to curb youth violence in the District. She focused her efforts on the North Capitol Street, Northwest corridor.When Williams became mayor, he tapped her to be Ward 8’s Neighborhood Coordinator where she worked to assist residents in dealing with the District government.In 2007, when Williams left office, Reeder went to work for Far Southeast Family Strengthening Collaborative, managing the organization’s daily operations as well as its community-oriented multi-million dollar programs.In recent years, Reeder opened up her business to help Ward 8 economically.Among the reasons she decided to run for the council was a piece of legislation that D.C. Council member Elissa Silverman (I-At Large) was sponsoring.  Silverman is the author of the Universal Paid Leave Act, which guarantees District employees in the private sector up to 16 weeks of paid leave per year. Reeder said that she has problems with Silverman’s legislation.“It hurts small businesses,” Reeder said.Reeder argues that small businesses will be particularly hurt by Silverman’s legislation because they may not be able to recoup the lost employee time, nor have the resources to make up for work that will not get done. However, Silverman told The AFRO that’s not true.“I am a champion of paid leave because working families feel squeezed,” she said. “And many small businesses, including restaurants, say they want to provide this benefit to retain their workers and keep them healthy but can’t afford to pay it out of pocket. Our paid leave law helps by giving a very big benefit to both workers and businesses for a very modest payroll tax.”Reeder also said that Silverman is not a strong supporter of the Mayor Marion S. Barry Summer Youth Employment Program (SYEP), which allows District employers to offer temporary jobs and training to teenagers and young adults.“I have heard so many people tell me they got their first job working for the Summer Youth [Employment] Program that was started by Marion Barry,” Reeder said. “She cut $2 million out of the program, wants young people to take an entrance exam to get into it, and wants to max out participation for three years. That program was once for specific people but now it is for everyone.“It teaches young people the importance of a work ethic. She said the program was a problem and only has visited 20 sites to see it.”Silverman said that Reeder is in error on her stand with SYEP.“I am a big champion of SYEP, including expanding it to 24-years-old,” she said. “That’s why my committee did not cut funding.”The councilmember said “an entrance exam is not in the legislation” and “the biggest thing the legislation does is make learning life skills like showing up on time, communicating with supervisors and colleagues and learning how to resolve conflict maturely a centerpiece of the summer work experience.”Reeder’s platform includes using District government resources to invest in the next generation, make the District more affordable for residents of all income levels, and focus on seniors, millennials and families. She wants to invest in the District’s private sector, saying it should be easier to start and run a business in the city with a special emphasis on neighborhood establishments.Reeder and other Independent candidates will face Silverman in the Nov. 6 general election.Stuart Anderson is a Ward 8 political activist and told The AFRO he favors Reeder.“When I looked at the candidates in the at-large race, I saw that Dionne was the best,” he said. “She is a Black business owner and I am confident that she will look out for the best interests of Black businesses. We need a voice on the D.C. Council for Black businesses and she will serve as that voice.”last_img read more

Scientists create purplewinged butterflies in six generations

first_imgThe team says engineers could use these findings when designing devices that tune color, trap light or steer light beams. Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences When the researchers examined the wings that had changed color, they discovered that the thickness of some of the scales had changed. This altered the wavelengths of light the wings reflected. They studied the wings of B. sambulos and B. medontias, which naturally have wings that reflect violet light, and found that some of their wing scales were similar in thickness to those that had changed in the purple-winged B. anynana. However, the types of scales that reflected violet light in B. sambulos and B. medontias were different from the type of scale that had changed in B. anynana.Monteiro’s team believe their experiment shows that butterfly wing colors can evolve very quickly and that natural selection could play an important role in the development of wing color. For example, butterflies could use wing color to identify other butterflies of the same species or to influence mate choice. Explore further (Phys.org) —Scientists have used selective breeding to create purple wings on the normally brown-winged butterfly Bicyclus anynana. Antonia Monteiro and her colleagues selected butterflies with wing scales that reflected light closest to the wavelengths that produce the color violet and bred them. After six generation of breeding, the researchers produced butterflies with wings that had changed structurally to reflect violet light. The research appears in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Deciphering butterflies’ designer colors: Findings could inspire new hue-changing materials Bicyclus anynana before (left) and after (right) artificial selection efforts to produce butterflies with violet wing scales. After selective breeding, the butterflies displayed more violet color in the ground scales of their wings. Credit: Antónia Monteiro Citation: Scientists create purple-winged butterflies in six generations (2014, August 5) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-08-scientists-purple-winged-butterflies.html The butterfly Bicyclus anynana before artificial selection to alter wing color. Credit: William Piel. After six generations of artificial selection, Bicyclus anynana developed violet ground scales in its wings while the cover scales remained brown. Credit: Antónia Monteiro More information: Artificial selection for structural color on butterfly wings and comparison with natural evolution, PNAS, Bethany R. Wasik, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1402770111AbstractBrilliant animal colors often are produced from light interacting with intricate nano-morphologies present in biological materials such as butterfly wing scales. Surveys across widely divergent butterfly species have identified multiple mechanisms of structural color production; however, little is known about how these colors evolved. Here, we examine how closely related species and populations of Bicyclus butterflies have evolved violet structural color from brown-pigmented ancestors with UV structural color. We used artificial selection on a laboratory model butterfly, B. anynana, to evolve violet scales from UV brown scales and compared the mechanism of violet color production with that of two other Bicyclus species, Bicyclus sambulos and Bicyclus medontias, which have evolved violet/blue scales independently via natural selection. The UV reflectance peak of B. anynana brown scales shifted to violet over six generations of artificial selection (i.e., in less than 1 y) as the result of an increase in the thickness of the lower lamina in ground scales. Similar scale structures and the same mechanism for producing violet/blue structural colors were found in the other Bicyclus species. This work shows that populations harbor large amounts of standing genetic variation that can lead to rapid evolution of scales’ structural color via slight modifications to the scales’ physical dimensions. The butterfly Bicyclus medontias displays violet-colored wing scales that evolved through natural selection. Credit: Antónia Monteiro Living things can produce color chemically or structurally. Those that produce chemical color create pigments that absorb certain wavelengths of light and reflect others. Organisms that produce structural color experience changes in their bodies, at the nanoscale level, that enhance the reflection of particular wavelengths.Butterfly wings have structural color. To understand how this color evolves, Monteiro and her team selectively bred B. anynana, a butterfly that normally has brown wings, in an attempt to create purple wings. Two close relatives of this butterfly, B. sambulos and B. medontias, have purple scales on the backs of their front wings. However, until now, no one has ever reported seeing any purple-winged B. anynana.To create purple wings, the team measured the wavelengths of light reflected from the wings of B. anynana specimens. They then selected and bred those butterflies whose wings reflected light closest to the violet spectrum. They performed this process six times in eight consecutive generations. As the breeding process continued, reflected wavelengths moved further toward the violet spectrum. By the sixth time, the butterflies had purple wings. © 2014 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more