Security Council extends UN operation in Georgia for further six months

The Security Council today extended until 15 October the mandate of the United Nations Observer Mission in Georgia (UNOMIG), established in 1993 to verify compliance with a cessation of hostilities and separation of forces accord following the armed conflict between the Georgian and Abkhaz sides.In unanimously adopting the resolution extending UNOMIG, the 15-member body called on both sides to consolidate and build on recent improvements in the overall security situation along the ceasefire line, and underlined the need for “a period of sustained stability” along the line and in the Kodori Valley.Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, in his recent report on Abkhazia, Georgia, noted that “a period of sustained stability along the ceasefire line and in the Kodori Valley would improve the prospect of repairing the much deteriorated relationship between the two sides.” In today’s resolution, the Council urged “all parties to consider and address seriously each other’s legitimate security concerns, to refrain from any acts of violence or provocation, including political action or rhetoric, and to comply fully with previous agreements regarding ceasefire and non-use of violence.”It also called on both sides to finalize without delay documents on the non-use of violence and on the return of refugees and internally displaced persons (IDPs).At its February meeting in Geneva, the Secretary-General’s Group of Friends expressed its disappointment at the lack of progress in implementing the proposals it had set out last year to boost confidence between the parties.The Council too expressed its regret at the lack of such progress, and urged both sides to implement these measures without conditions. 15 April 2008The Security Council today extended until 15 October the mandate of the United Nations Observer Mission in Georgia (UNOMIG), established in 1993 to verify compliance with a cessation of hostilities and separation of forces accord following the armed conflict between the Georgian and Abkhaz sides.

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